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05-08-2020, 11:42   #16
flogen
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I moved one of the wisterias as it was looking particularly sad. Still trying to figure out what to do with the others - and what to plant in the boxes once they’re all clear.
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05-08-2020, 19:18   #17
standardg60
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I moved one of the wisterias as it was looking particularly sad. Still trying to figure out what to do with the others - and what to plant in the boxes once they’re all clear.
You may have misunderstood the advice. All and any climbers should be planted in the ground wherever you want to cover walls or fences. The boxes are really only suitable for temporary or dwarf planting.
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05-08-2020, 19:36   #18
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We are officially in the autumn season so your wisteria will naturally be looking less than best as it prepares for winter.
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05-08-2020, 20:31   #19
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You may have misunderstood the advice. All and any climbers should be planted in the ground wherever you want to cover walls or fences. The boxes are really only suitable for temporary or dwarf planting.
No - I moved it to another spot that I’m happy to see covered by a climber.

I’ll have to find something more suitable for the wall with the pots
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05-08-2020, 20:32   #20
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We are officially in the autumn season so your wisteria will naturally be looking less than best as it prepares for winter.
True.

Generally speaking am I better leaving the rest where it is or rehoming it asap?
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06-08-2020, 15:06   #21
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Rehome them as the autumn comes along. Unless there is a prolonged dry spell they will not come to much harm for a couple of months.

Your boxes would be better used for 'annual' type planting. Anything that is going to produce a lot of extensive top growth, like climbers, needs more space for the matching root system, as we have discussed. You could get a bit of height with maybe some grasses in your troughs, but mostly plant things like violas and cyclamen for the autumn and into the winter, some smaller bulbs for next spring (daffs would grow but they make a lot of untidy leaf growth that lasts ages). Remove the violas in due course and let the bulbs flower, maybe add a few primulas, then follow up with summer bedding.

I don't recommend those huge flowered primulas you see making a spectacular show in supermarkets; the first bit of rain or wind will knock the flowers about and they will look pathetic. Buy the ordinary small flowered primulas in garden centres, they are much more reliable.
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07-08-2020, 13:31   #22
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Rehome them as the autumn comes along. Unless there is a prolonged dry spell they will not come to much harm for a couple of months.
Great, thanks

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Your boxes would be better used for 'annual' type planting. Anything that is going to produce a lot of extensive top growth, like climbers, needs more space for the matching root system, as we have discussed. You could get a bit of height with maybe some grasses in your troughs, but mostly plant things like violas and cyclamen for the autumn and into the winter, some smaller bulbs for next spring (daffs would grow but they make a lot of untidy leaf growth that lasts ages). Remove the violas in due course and let the bulbs flower, maybe add a few primulas, then follow up with summer bedding.
Thanks for that. I’ve resigned myself to the fact that I won’t have my ugly fencing completely obscured (not by climbers, anyway) but hoping I can find some things to cover at least *some* of it... grasses might not be a bad idea. If there are any big plants / small shrubs that would even give me 2-3ft of height that would be okay too.

Might look at a few annual plants as you suggest too - just to add a bit of colour and take the bare look off what’s behind it.
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07-08-2020, 14:10   #23
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You know those vigorous root systems? There's something to be said for keeping them contained! I have a Wisteria that was transplanted from one part of the garden and "less than ideal" conditions to another about 10 years ago. It's now a b s o l u t e l y m a s s i v e ... which is OK for me, because I have a lot of wall/courtyard/footpath to cover, but would totally overwhelm my parents' or my siblings' gardens; and it needs aggressive pruning every year to keep in check. Oh, and it leaves a ton of flower petals on the ground after flowering, twice a year.

The Wisteria totally dominates the jasmine planted about 5m away from it, but that too is pretty vigorous, invading the old chicken shed against which it's growing. I'm in my third year of trying to selectively prune the Wisteria to let the jasmine get a look in, while also trying to keep the jasmine under control.

After that experience - and because neither of them want anything to do with the other two walls in the courtyard - earlier this year I bought a passion flower and a trumpet flower. 30cm high at purchase, repotted immediately into deep 25cm pots and they're each about 2m high now (the passion flower is flowering). Although I will eventually put them into the ground, that probably won't be for at least another two or three years - the time it takes me to decide exactly where I want them situated so that I can best train the vines afterwards.

There's no reason you can't have a vigorous climber in a pot/trough as long as you accept that you'll have to look after it (feed/water) a lot more than a ground-growing one ... but you might "win" later on by having to prune it less.
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07-08-2020, 16:16   #24
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You know those vigorous root systems? There's something to be said for keeping them contained! I have a Wisteria that was transplanted from one part of the garden and "less than ideal" conditions to another about 10 years ago. It's now a b s o l u t e l y m a s s i v e ... which is OK for me, because I have a lot of wall/courtyard/footpath to cover, but would totally overwhelm my parents' or my siblings' gardens; and it needs aggressive pruning every year to keep in check. Oh, and it leaves a ton of flower petals on the ground after flowering, twice a year.

The Wisteria totally dominates the jasmine planted about 5m away from it, but that too is pretty vigorous, invading the old chicken shed against which it's growing. I'm in my third year of trying to selectively prune the Wisteria to let the jasmine get a look in, while also trying to keep the jasmine under control.

After that experience - and because neither of them want anything to do with the other two walls in the courtyard - earlier this year I bought a passion flower and a trumpet flower. 30cm high at purchase, repotted immediately into deep 25cm pots and they're each about 2m high now (the passion flower is flowering). Although I will eventually put them into the ground, that probably won't be for at least another two or three years - the time it takes me to decide exactly where I want them situated so that I can best train the vines afterwards.
Ha, Maybe you’re right... and now you’re starting to make me doubt my decision to move one of the wisterias to a separate area of bedding...!

I wouldn’t mind, but there’s a spot of bedding to the right of the horrible fencing that, in hindsight, would have been perfect for what a wisteria seems to like to do... I maybe could have trained it across the top of the fencing or something like that.

However earlier this year I used that spot to plant a climbing rose. It’s doing quite well, so I don’t want to touch it, but I don’t expect it’ll give me nearly the same level of coverage when all is said and done.

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There's no reason you can't have a vigorous climber in a pot/trough as long as you accept that you'll have to look after it (feed/water) a lot more than a ground-growing one ... but you might "win" later on by having to prune it less.
That doesn’t bother me too much - once I know the best way of looking after it all.
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