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02-06-2020, 07:30   #16
Tordelback
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All land was taken from the only true native Irish, the Mesolithic people who settled the uninhabited post-glacial island. The State should pay all blow-in landowners a few quid and tell them to get lost.

Congratulations OP, you've reinvented communism. Not that this is necessarily a bad thing, but itcmay not have been what you were aiming for. Now if you'll excuse me I have to check on my fishtraps, and these hares aren't going to skin themselves.

Last edited by Tordelback; 02-06-2020 at 07:38.
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02-06-2020, 08:11   #17
Del.Monte
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There's still quite a few of those Mesolithic types around so they can't all have been wiped out.



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03-06-2020, 10:51   #18
Macu17ab
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There's still quite a few of those Mesolithic types around so they can't all have been wiped out.




LOL.

Ah sure lads, my mind has not changed on the matter, but it'd be a boring auld world if we agreed on everything!
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03-06-2020, 12:20   #19
whisky_galore
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So which is it OP, do purchase these estates with shirtbuttons, because that's the way the economy is going or do we just chase them out at gunpoint, a good old fashioned ethnic cleansing?

Honestly, the quality of threads in H&H has gone down the toilet.
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08-06-2020, 18:23   #20
Macu17ab
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So which is it OP, do purchase these estates with shirtbuttons, because that's the way the economy is going or do we just chase them out at gunpoint, a good old fashioned ethnic cleansing?

Honestly, the quality of threads in H&H has gone down the toilet.
I think the shirtbuttons would be a good and fair trade Whisky - Sorry the thread is not to your linear taste!
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08-06-2020, 18:38   #21
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Setting aside everything else. Lets say hypothetically they all decided they wanted to up and sell, what would it cost the country? Any got a rough idea of the value of Slane castle and its land (and it turn any others people want to list)?
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08-06-2020, 18:47   #22
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A lot to be said for planting these large estates in native woodland and encourage re-release of wildlife


Likes of book of lismore should never been left leave the country either,these big estates dont offer anything to state in there present form

We should introduce a 1st refusal law,where if/when these estates ever come up for sale,the state has first refusal on buying them
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08-06-2020, 20:48   #23
Del.Monte
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A lot to be said for planting these large estates in native woodland and encourage re-release of wildlife


Likes of book of lismore should never been left leave the country either,these big estates dont offer anything to state in there present form

We should introduce a 1st refusal law,where if/when these estates ever come up for sale,the state has first refusal on buying them

What do you think these estates are planted in? Most of them are oases for wildlife without the dead hand of the State get involved. When private developers are involved you get hotels, golf courses, holiday chalets etc. This thread continues to go downhill and I didn't think that was possible.



Where's CDfm when you need him - gone since 2014 and sorely missed on this forum.
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08-06-2020, 20:51   #24
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What do you think these estates are planted in? Most of them are oases for wildlife without the dead hand of the State get involved. When private developers are involved you get hotels, golf courses, holiday chalets etc. This thread continues to go downhill and I didn't think that was possible.



Where's CDfm when you need him - gone since 2014 and sorely missed on this forum.
Plant the entirety of them?

Any i see about arent fully planted (curraghmore/mt congrove etc),possibly look into this imo.....it would do all sorts of greatness for wildlife and native trees here and not result in usual nuclear wasteland type sites,that accomy commerial timber


CDfm is on the r/irishhistory.....good guy that lad
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10-06-2020, 08:12   #25
purplepanda
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The Wyndman Acts & previous legislation were the start of land distribution in Ireland which was implemented alongside other reforms to
"kill Home Rule with kindness" . The Irish Free State was just continuing the land reform process started earlier, most of it was already done by that period.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land_Acts_(Ireland)#:~:text=This%20was%20the%20basis%20of,'Brien%20orchestrated%20through%20parliament..&text=The%20Acts%20provided%20Irish%20tenant,rest%20of%20the%20United%20Kingdom.

It's actually England & in particular Scotland that needs a modern equivalent of the Ireland land Acts.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...ip-in-scotland

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/u...-a8878931.html

A few old families in these massive old houses, that usually need constant expensive maintenance, with heritage laws to prevent any serious modernisation.

The government cost of taking over these properties would be better spent elsewhere on many historical sites that need real invesment.

Last edited by purplepanda; 10-06-2020 at 08:16.
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17-06-2020, 14:31   #26
Marcusm
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Hi folks,

As many of you may be aware, there are still a lot of large land-holdings belonging to British aristocrats which have held this lands in Irelands for hundreds of years to date. These include estates like Slane Castle, and Powerscourt Gardens. During the formation of our Free State Government, the “Land Act” was implemented and offered these British land lords to purchase the land.

Considering Ireland’s independent economy at this time was virtually non-existent, and improving relations with the British elite was in our best interest - the purchases of the land act were surely offered from a position of extreme disadvantage on the Irish state’s behalf.

Should the Irish state offer/enforce, today, a compensation to these modern-day aristocrats, where the land is reclaimed for the Irish state? The money gained from these sites like entry fees for tours, gigs, events etc could be used towards Irish culture projects and the establishment of modern gaeltachts where our language could be given a chance to thrive in future generations.

Just a thought. You can see an article below from 2016 which can give you an idea of the current “Anglo-Irish” land holdings in Ireland today:

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.ind...-35074914.html
The Conynghams who own Slane Castle live there; should they be evicted. The Slazenger’s own Powerscourt since 1961. Have you perhaps chosen the wrong targets?
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23-06-2020, 14:26   #27
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It's somewhat funny that in Politics there is a thread where a poster has suggested, not that unreasonably, that someone who has been born in Ireland, and who's family can trace their presence here through four generations should be regarded as Irish.

But, this thread seems to be predicated on the idea that there are people who can trace their family's presence here back even further, but they are not Irish? Or just not Irish enough for the OP's taste?
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03-07-2020, 20:18   #28
paul71
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That article claims among other ridiculous assertions things that the Guinness family is somehow British Aristocracy. They are 17th century merchant/brewers from Celbridge in Co. Kildare and never had any kind of Aristocratic connection, in all probability they would be Irish Gael descent converted to church of Ireland in 16th or 17th century. Similarly, the Plunkets in Meath had been in Ireland so long prior to the reformation that their DNA is probably 25% Norman / 75% Gaelic Aristocracy.

Its a simple pile of lazy rubbish targeted at lazy ultra nationalists seeking false outrage.
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12-07-2020, 16:28   #29
A Tyrant Named Miltiades!
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As daft as this idea is, this was an activity that was pursued by the Land Commission, probably one of the most divisive institutions ever to exist in this country, which up unwil WW1, was still seizing land from large farmers and turning it into uneconomic smaller farms.

The practice is part of the reason why Irish farms are noticeably smaller than our counterparts in the UK and mainland Europe. It was a disastrous policy. My own Grandad got into a dispute with the Land Commission and local neighbours because he had no male siblings and only one infant son, to share his farm (which wasn't even some big estate), and it ended up in the High Court. Ridiculous carry-on.

Some people were big fans of that kind of land seizure though, so the OP's comments aren't totally removed from fairly recent agricultural policy.
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12-07-2020, 17:15   #30
paul71
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As daft as this idea is, this was an activity that was pursued by the Land Commission, probably one of the most divisive institutions ever to exist in this country, which up unwil WW1, was still seizing land from large farmers and turning it into uneconomic smaller farms.

The practice is part of the reason why Irish farms are noticeably smaller than our counterparts in the UK and mainland Europe. It was a disastrous policy. My own Grandad got into a dispute with the Land Commission and local neighbours because he had no male siblings and only one infant son, to share his farm (which wasn't even some big estate), and it ended up in the High Court. Ridiculous carry-on.

Some people were big fans of that kind of land seizure though, so the OP's comments aren't totally removed from fairly recent agricultural policy.

The land commission was an institution inherited by the Free state and subsequently the republic from the British administration. It was a required land reform although in practice it was turned into a political tool, particularly by Fianna Fail. However it was not a simple theft of land, the landowners were compensated for what was often unprofitable land as by the 1880s rent was in most cases simply not being paid.
The whole land commission ea is fascinating as it had all kinds of social consequences. I even remember my Grandfather saying something that I often heard repeated, "free land in Meath, unless you are from Meath".


Ps. There was still land commisssion holdings been given out as late as the 1980s.
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