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22-01-2021, 19:11   #271
TP_CM
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Hi Tar. I'd also mention reducing exposure to blue light in the hour before bed and using BL filters.
I have a paperwhite Kindle, does that mess with melatonin levels does anyone know?
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22-01-2021, 20:06   #272
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Anecdotal, but my best friend would agree. She sleeps when needed. If wakes up in wee hours. Does not fight it. Gets up and does something. Lids get heavy. Goes back to sleep. Feels OK mornings.
The thing is - to get up and do something would require putting a light on - surely that would further reduce someones change of getting back to sleep. 🤔
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22-01-2021, 20:18   #273
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The thing is - to get up and do something would require putting a light on - surely that would further reduce someones change of getting back to sleep. 🤔
Thats a good point and in a lot of the books on sleep problems they recommend you use a small flashlight to make your way around. It's a small issue really as the main thing is that you get up and do not stay there tormented.
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23-01-2021, 09:17   #274
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5MuIMqhT8DM

He highlights how detrimental to your health it can be when you suffer from long term sleep problems.
Matt Walker: [on sleep] "Regularity is king."
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23-01-2021, 14:42   #275
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Thats a good point and in a lot of the books on sleep problems they recommend you use a small flashlight to make your way around. It's a small issue really as the main thing is that you get up and do not stay there tormented.
A torch sounds like just the ticket.
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23-01-2021, 14:43   #276
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I have a paperwhite Kindle, does that mess with melatonin levels does anyone know?
I would think so, yes.
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23-01-2021, 14:44   #277
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I once went 3 nights with zero sleep when my problem was at its worse. Often have nights now with zero sleep.
I just cannot imagine getting zero sleep at all for a night. At least your sleep pattern is good now.
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23-01-2021, 14:44   #278
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Originally Posted by olestoepoke View Post
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5MuIMqhT8DM

He highlights how detrimental to your health it can be when you suffer from long term sleep problems.
I've seen many of Matt Walkers videos. Very educational and a likeable guy to boot.
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23-01-2021, 15:29   #279
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I just cannot imagine getting zero sleep at all for a night. At least your sleep pattern is good now.
How is this possible in an insomnia thread?!
haha really only kidding, but honestly - that's me at least twice a month, no sleep at all for two or almost three days at a time.

It's really really bad for us, sleep is so essential for brain health, and of course mental health in general.
Grand for the first 24, almost get a buzz from the second wind of awakeness, but it leaves me floored for a week after.

Obviously doesn't help the circadian rhythm, at all. I do the same as other posters, I'll get up and do something, can't lie in bed or I spiral massively into "I'll never sleep again" thinking



On the torch thing, you know those headlamps for walking/working?

They often have a red light on the back of them. This is a good option for nighttime wakers who don't want the brightness of lamps (especially blue LEDs which mimic daylight so well.
Red light will affect your circadian rhythm less, by not affecting melatonin production as much as 'bluer' lights afaik
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23-01-2021, 15:45   #280
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How is this possible in an insomnia thread?!
haha really only kidding, but honestly - that's me at least twice a month, no sleep at all for two or almost three days at a time.

It's really really bad for us, sleep is so essential for brain health, and of course mental health in general.
Grand for the first 24, almost get a buzz from the second wind of awakeness, but it leaves me floored for a week after.

Obviously doesn't help the circadian rhythm, at all. I do the same as other posters, I'll get up and do something, can't lie in bed or I spiral massively into "I'll never sleep again" thinking

On the torch thing, you know those headlamps for walking/working?

They often have a red light on the back of them. This is a good option for nighttime wakers who don't want the brightness of lamps (especially blue LEDs which mimic daylight so well.
Red light will affect your circadian rhythm less, by not affecting melatonin production as much as 'bluer' lights afaik
Hi lucalux. Good tip there re light colors. Sleep is even more vital for our bodies.
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23-01-2021, 15:55   #281
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The light from screen of a smart phone is sufficient to get about. We also keep Salt lamps on in hall and kitchen so can move about/make tea without putting on main lights.
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23-01-2021, 17:43   #282
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https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/sleep-a...-get-to-sleep/
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23-01-2021, 22:58   #283
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How is this possible in an insomnia thread?!
haha really only kidding, but honestly - that's me at least twice a month, no sleep at all for two or almost three days at a time.

It's really really bad for us, sleep is so essential for brain health, and of course mental health in general.
Grand for the first 24, almost get a buzz from the second wind of awakeness, but it leaves me floored for a week after.

Obviously doesn't help the circadian rhythm, at all. I do the same as other posters, I'll get up and do something, can't lie in bed or I spiral massively into "I'll never sleep again" thinking



On the torch thing, you know those headlamps for walking/working?

They often have a red light on the back of them. This is a good option for nighttime wakers who don't want the brightness of lamps (especially blue LEDs which mimic daylight so well.
Red light will affect your circadian rhythm less, by not affecting melatonin production as much as 'bluer' lights afaik
It's difficult to explain to someone that has never experienced what it its like after 2 or 3 days without sleep. For me its a state of confusion, cant string thoughts together in my mind. Every sound is amplified and annoys you, your mood is terrible and everyone is annoying.
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23-01-2021, 23:21   #284
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It's difficult to explain to someone that has never experienced what it its like after 2 or 3 days without sleep. For me its a state of confusion, cant string thoughts together in my mind. Every sound is amplified and annoys you, your mood is terrible and everyone is annoying.
Agreed, it's debilitating in a very real way. I get about 60 points stupider on the IQ scale I'd guess.

Affects mood, relationships, work, and tbh personality, if it goes on long enough too.
Irritable people are not themselves at all at all
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