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31-03-2012, 23:55   #1
slowburner
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Seen & Found

Here's a place to post and discuss pictures of sites or artifacts of general archaeological interest.
If you are not sure where to post up material you have seen or found, post here.

Please note that all archaeological objects must be reported to the National Museum of Ireland. See the stickies on the landing page.

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01-04-2012, 00:01   #2
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I'll start the ball rolling with this.
These stones protruding through the dense carpet of pine needles are grave markers - all that is left of a cemetery which fell into disuse in 1130.
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File Type: jpg Grave markers, Wicklow uplands March 2012.jpg (378.5 KB, 3911 views)
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01-04-2012, 08:50   #3
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Great Slowburner, I'll get clicking on my lime kilns and might call to the field where the old barracks walls stand.
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08-04-2012, 11:57   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowburner View Post
I'll start the ball rolling with this.
These stones protruding through the dense carpet of pine needles are grave markers - all that is left of a cemetery which fell into disuse in 1130.
Interestingly, the SMR states that these markers were not visible when the site was visited in 1997.
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08-04-2012, 12:13   #5
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The stone on the right is a confirmed neolithic, cup marked stone, which may have been reused as a grave marker in a later period.
Whoever reused the stone, must have felt that the crude resemblance to a face gave it a certain significance.
The stone on the left is an in situ grave marker - probably medieval.



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08-04-2012, 20:15   #6
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Interesting stuff.
I pass my old barracks walls every day and still haven't stopped to take pics, will do it some time soon.
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14-04-2012, 10:11   #7
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1,790 feet above sea level is this curious circle of stones.


The cairn (?) is situated in an early ditch, visible from the air, but not clear on the ground.



It's an intriguing area, stuffed with history and prehistory, but a gruelling two hour climb. Much more to be seen and found!
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File Type: jpg cairn? Wicklow highlands.jpg (645.1 KB, 3528 views)
File Type: jpg cairn & ditch.jpg (97.2 KB, 3477 views)
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14-04-2012, 14:53   #8
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Pictures from yesterday 13th April 2012, I was very surprised on what I found (after a bit of research).

Motte and Bailey at St Helens (Malahide/Portmarnock) Predecessor to Malahide Castle

the Talbot family resided in Malahide for the next eight centuries. Their first stronghold was possibly a motte and bailey castle, the earthwork remains of a motte survive at Wheatfields southeast of Malahide, before a stone castle was built on the site of the current Malahide Castle.

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14-04-2012, 15:14   #9
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item labelled ad "Patricks Well" on OSi map.

located near Paddy's Hill between Malahide and Portmarnock

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14-04-2012, 19:42   #10
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No shortage of St.Patrick's wells on this island of ours.
It is an odd looking stone - there seems to be a fair bit of quartz in it.
Has the well dried up?
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27-04-2012, 20:26   #11
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Hi Slowburner, just wondering if you think this stone is an odd shape too ? It is quite small, guessing approx. 60cm tall. There are some more stones lying around, which I suspect were once part of a stone wall now deconstructed. This is very near me, but I had the kids in the car and could only shoot it from the fence, poor quality pics, will walk to it when I get a chance and take better pics.
This is not listed on my Waterford Arch. Survey book, as far as I remember.

interesting stone crop by mountainsandheather, on Flickr


interesting stone by mountainsandheather, on Flickr

more context

interesting stone more context bis by mountainsandheather, on Flickr

Last edited by Mountainsandh; 27-04-2012 at 20:44. Reason: other pic
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27-04-2012, 22:03   #12
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I'm only an amateur in these matters, so hopefully someone who is professional, will drop by with a more educated opinion.

I do think it's a curious stone, all the same. It is a big stone for a field wall - perhaps it was there beforehand, and was later incorporated into the field wall.
It is very unlikely that the stone ended up that way naturally.
It's a bit difficult to see any remains of the wall - it looks more like a scattered selection of stones. If it is close to a field boundary, it could be the result of field stone clearance.
Maybe you could take a picture or two of the wider context. This would help to see if the associated stones are part of a wall or something else.
More often than not, stones cleared from a field will have plough marks - these can easily be misinterpreted as I should know

I'm sure it would be worthwhile to have a closer look to see if there is any sign of the hand of man, especially signs of shaping or boring - these might not be immediately obvious, and could need a bit of close scrutiny.

You have an eye for more than the 2 dimensional landscape now, I'll bet
Looking forward to more pictures.
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27-04-2012, 23:09   #13
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Thanks for that, I'll go back and take more pics allright, and will take plenty of the context. I have been looking at this ever since we moved here, and although there is nothing on the survey book, it's just so distinctive seen from the road (as in the pic) that it has kept me intrigued nevertheless.

Looking at the maps on OSI, yes, it's a wall, or the remnants of. There are some marks, hard to tell, either square or circular, and very very slight, could be anything really, around that spot. If the 6" maps showed a dwelling, it could have been a corner stone I suppose, but there is nothing there. Here is a collage of Bing and OSI aerial views. It could simply have been a big stone damaged while being moved.

stone by mountainsandheather, on Flickr

And yes, I am looking at the landscape a lot, and differently, but have been for quite a while, it's just now I'm attempting to learn a bit about it. I look at every ditch and mound with a suspicious eye, and my ramblings keep Mr Mountains highly entertained (ehhh...not) on our campervan journeys (great for spotting features, the view from the camper ).
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28-04-2012, 11:19   #14
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It's a gate post, more than likely.
In the Bing image, you can see the line of a pathway which leads from the gate at the road, and you can see the gateway through the field wall quite clearly in the OSI (2000) image. In the same image, you can also see the darker area of the path from gate to gate.
The OSI 2000 orthophotographic is a great source of information because the survey was carried out in a really dry period. Underground features with a lot of stone, or those that are compacted, tend to hold more water than open soil. So, in a prolonged dry period, these areas show up as being greener than the surrounding areas. The compacted soil and/or stone of the path is very clear in that image.
There seems to be a lot of loose stone in the fields. That could indicate habitation at some time, or it could just be a stony upland field.

You need to identify a really interesting feature, one that you are certain about from your research. Then suggest a picnic in that spot. Gently allow Mr.MS to notice the features, all by himself - you never know, he might get hooked. Alternatively, you drive and let him do the spotting
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07-05-2012, 23:20   #15
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Lefanta, Cappoquin Co Waterford


Lefanta by mountainsandheather, on Flickr

Not much to see, but such a great spot I had to keep a record for myself, and thought I'd share. Nice layby and informative panel on the spot too.
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