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01-09-2020, 18:41   #31
Spanish Eyes
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This was a place our relatives took us for lunch. On the banks of the Thames not far from London in Wolvercote. Absolutely gorgeous spot.

Be rather difficult to find similar here.

The Trout Inn. Sitting outside on the banks of the river was magical, and the place is ancient also. Just saying, and that was just ONE place we visited in the area, all delightful. But sure when you're on holliers everything looks great I know that, but still.

https://www.thetroutoxford.co.uk/
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01-09-2020, 22:38   #32
Hamsterchops
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I think what OP was referring to was the ANCIENT stuff, like the Norman churches, the timber framed housing, the pubs extant since the 16th c or before with uneven floors, the thatched cottages in a cluster, the village green, and so on.

Stratford on Avon is one example.
Exactly what I'm talking about .....

So many examples in towns across England & Wales.
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01-09-2020, 22:42   #33
Hurrache
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British probably burned them.
Moreso the Irish burned them, many were seen as symbols of British rule and landlords.
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01-09-2020, 22:54   #34
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Well Tudor styles in Ireland were basically mud huts! Just like in England for the agrarian populace.

Some "baronial halls" do exist like Carrick as mentioned but considering the centuries of conflict and retribution it's probably not a shock that few "domestic" structures of that era exist. It should be said some exist but as sections of a more modern structure so can be hard to spot.

One of that type in Waterford that is very central in T&H Doolans which was build in 1710 but has features from the 11th century.

I'd bet there are not too many Tudor timber houses with quoins.

Reginald's tower in Waterford is the oldest continually used municipal building in Ireland.
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01-09-2020, 23:17   #35
JustAThought
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Exactly what I'm talking about .....

So many examples in towns across England & Wales.
OP seems to be blithely and blissfully unaware that the UK and Ireland are two entirely different countries. Also shocking lack of basic knowledge about Irish history and fight for emancipation. Perhaps the OP dosn’t know or should google about the fight for Catholic Emancipation and its legal basis. Catholics (majority of the population) not allowed to have civil servant jobs,Catholics not allowed to speak their own native tongue, Catholics not allowed to recieve an education hence illegal hedge schools, CaTholics not allowed to own property over a hovel value, Catholics not allowed to pass land to one child only but forced to subdivide each tiny holding amongst all children leading to subsistance farming & dire poverty, Catholics not allowed to own a horse for personal use or farming over a pitiful value making ploughing a manual backbreakng task, land taken from landed catholic families and given forcibly to UK Protestants to then rent to subsistance Itish families farmers for impossible sums or for the faMilies toliterally be thrown onto the streets/roads and forced to starve, go to the workhouse or emigrate on coffin ships etc
There is a reason we fought the british empire for generations - finally winning our independence just over 100 years ago. There is a reason why the continued embedded hatred and discrimination in the North caused so much tragedy and hatred and murders and ruined lives well into the 1990’s.

We had better things to be thinking about than pretty houses for future generations.
Most prosperous towns were Dominated by wealthy Protrstants whose houses may have survived or were Market Towns or Garrison Towns where the dominant buildings were the courthouses and administration buildings, tax offices, garrison barracks and cottages for british soldiers, the main constabulary houses etc

Thankfully most issues now resolved and we are stuck with our own government taxing us to extinction instead.

Last edited by JustAThought; 01-09-2020 at 23:22.
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01-09-2020, 23:43   #36
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^^^ Lovely simplistic analysis of 800 years of oppression - must be wonderful to see everything in black and white.
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02-09-2020, 02:31   #37
Peregrinus
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How did that survive? Is it the original or a pastiche do you know..
It's a pastiche. The building dates from 1710 and, even then, half-timbering was a historical style. Plus, I strongly suspect that the half-timbering isn't original to the building, but was applied later - probably in the nineteenth or even early twentieth century, when mock-Tudor was fashionable.

Plus, the windows are clearly modern.
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02-09-2020, 06:52   #38
Lime Tree Farm
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https://www.buildingsofireland.ie/bu...unty-waterford
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02-09-2020, 07:40   #39
bobbyy gee
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the English burnt them down
the Irish burnt them down
https://flowtechinc.com/irelands-architecture-history/
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02-09-2020, 08:42   #40
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Leixlip Castle was built in 1172, and is still inhabited to this day.
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02-09-2020, 09:32   #41
Harry Palmr
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When it was open in interior business (and that was a decade ago) you had to watch your head if much more than 6 feet tall,a very cosy ceiling height!
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02-09-2020, 15:46   #42
Hamsterchops
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OP seems to be blithely and blissfully unaware that the UK and Ireland are two entirely different countries.
Two islands next door to each other since the beginning of time & for eternity, hence me asking why so few ancient town centre buildings on this island, that's all . . . .

Britain was heavily bombed during WWII yet she still has so many old buildings, while we don't
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03-09-2020, 03:29   #43
Peregrinus
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Two islands next door to each other since the beginning of time & for eternity, hence me asking why so few ancient town centre buildings on this island, that's all . . . .

Britain was heavily bombed during WWII yet she still has so many old buildings, while we don't
Britain wasn't heavily bombed. Germany was heavily bombed.

And, in both countries (but especially in Germany) buildings that appear to be old heritage buildings may in fact turn out to be post-1945 facsimiles of old heritage buildings that were lost in the war. In Germany, in fact, this can be true of whole districts.
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03-09-2020, 03:36   #44
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Two islands next door to each other since the beginning of time & for eternity, hence me asking why so few ancient town centre buildings on this island, that's all . . . .
1 Island was a coloniser, the other a colony.
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03-09-2020, 03:59   #45
gozunda
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the English burnt them down
the Irish burnt them down
https://flowtechinc.com/irelands-architecture-history/
One of the reasons was that a lot of wooden medieval and later buildings fell down due to damp and humid conditions.

Ireland has a damp and temperate climate. Wood does not last.

Put up a wooden shed or fence and wait 10 years. Similar happened to many early building which literally fell apart after a couple of decades of Irish conditions.

The South of England is much drier and warmer than most of Ireland. Those houses were more likley to survive.

Go to Scotland or coastal Wales and its the same and there's bugger all early wooden buildings survived.
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