Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
03-09-2020, 04:06   #46
Peregrinus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 19,787
It's really down to prosperity. A society has to have attained a certain level of prosperity before many people can afford to build in a way that will last. Before that point, castles and churches might be built out of stone, but virtually everything else is jerry-built, and falls down or, if it is damaged, is not considered worth repairing. So buildings are constantly replaced by newer builldings on the same site, and you have few or no suriviving private residences or commercial buildings from the period.

England basically reached this level of prosperity during the Tudor era, so from that point on they were building enough durable houses, etc, that some of them have lasted. So, say, from the early sixteenth century. Ireland didn't get there until the late seventeenth. Whereas if you go to, say, Italy, they got there well before England so you have plenty of houses, villas, etc from the fifteenth century or before.
Peregrinus is online now  
(4) thanks from:
Advertisement
03-09-2020, 11:41   #47
Captain Havoc
English, Deutsch, Francais.
 
Captain Havoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 10,797
There are loads of historic buildings in urban areas. A lot of them get hidden behind modern frontage.
Captain Havoc is offline  
03-09-2020, 14:32   #48
gozunda
Registered User
 
gozunda's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 14,846
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Havoc View Post
There are loads of historic buildings in urban areas. A lot of them get hidden behind modern frontage.
True. Not sure about that there's 'loads' though.

https://www.thejournal.ie/oldest-hou...12711-Feb2019/

https://comeheretome.com/2012/12/17/...ge-work-house/
gozunda is offline  
Thanks from:
04-09-2020, 02:45   #49
Peregrinus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 19,787
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Havoc View Post
There are loads of historic buildings in urban areas. A lot of them get hidden behind modern frontage.
Depends on what you mean by "historic". There are really small numbers of pre-1700 private residential buildings still to be found in Irish towns. There would be more in in England and many, many more in France, Italy, Germany, etc.

And the "modern frontage" is often eighteenth or nineteenth century.
Peregrinus is online now  
11-09-2020, 16:34   #50
tromtipp
Registered User
 
tromtipp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 134
Many of Dublin's medieval and early modern buildings were deliberately destroyed by the Wide Streets Commission https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wide_Streets_Commission.

In smaller towns there is probably a lot more 17thand even 16th century fabric hidden behind later facades than we might expect - in Kilkenny, Rothe House isn't the only surviving 16th century building - but in many cases dating is only going to be possible if details are examined by experts. Town buildings were often stone - it's possible that continental/southern English style cage work houses were never common here - but look at all the medieval stone visible in central Galway.
tromtipp is offline  
Advertisement
13-09-2020, 21:19   #51
Yellow_Fern
Registered User
 
Yellow_Fern's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 1,073
Given the expertise on this thread would anyone be able to date when these these two old buildings were built? I spotted themin old photos of Waterford and Kilkenny. The kilkenny building is a gable fronted structure to the left of Shee Almshouse.



Yellow_Fern is offline  
Thanks from:
14-09-2020, 16:18   #52
Captain Havoc
English, Deutsch, Francais.
 
Captain Havoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 10,797
archaeology.ie is your only friend.

https://www.buildingsofireland.ie/bu...ounty-kilkenny
Captain Havoc is offline  
14-09-2020, 20:19   #53
Yellow_Fern
Registered User
 
Yellow_Fern's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Posts: 1,073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Havoc View Post
archaeology.ie is your only friend.

https://www.buildingsofireland.ie/bu...ounty-kilkenny
Thanks. I find that site great for Georgian stuff but there is some missing information for earlier stuff. The description in that report doesn't seem to match the photograph from 1900.
Yellow_Fern is offline  
14-09-2020, 21:09   #54
pg633
Registered User
 
pg633's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamsterchops View Post
Two islands next door to each other since the beginning of time & for eternity, hence me asking why so few ancient town centre buildings on this island, that's all . . . .

Britain was heavily bombed during WWII yet she still has so many old buildings, while we don't
Plenty of old buildings around if you look.
Galway has a medieval parish church in the middle that wouldn't look out of place in Midsomer Murders.
Wander around and you will see Lynches Castle, Blakes Castle, thick stone walls, look up and you will see loads of medieval bits still around like old windows or carvings.
Go into lots of shops or pubs and you will see random thick medieval walls.
The middle of Portwest on High Street (what used to be Kennys Bookshop) is the core of another old tower.

Go out the country and you won't get as much but there are tower houses that have lasted. Most people lived in poverty - no one preserved those houses.

The ones you seem to be comparing to in England were very much the homes of the well to do, not the serfs.
pg633 is online now  
Advertisement
15-09-2020, 10:19   #55
kildarejohn
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellow_Fern View Post
Thanks. I find that site great for Georgian stuff but there is some missing information for earlier stuff. The description in that report doesn't seem to match the photograph from 1900.
I am no expert on Kilkenny, but from experience of the NIAH descriptions of buildings in other towns, they are often quite wrong. My impression is that the people who carried out the reporting work in the early 2000's were architecturally qualified, but with no specific heritage architecture knowledge or training as historians. They seem to report (as if it were factual) their opinion of the building based only on an external visual survey, with no historical research.
kildarejohn is offline  
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet