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26-06-2018, 00:02   #31
marno21
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Just biding their time until Canney is no longer relevant when it will be quietly dropped. Everyone knows it's out of the question.

Why Canney hasn't done a massive U turn on this is bizarre. There seems to be a clear appetite in Tuam for a greenway on the old line judging by the events of the weekend and it could very well be his undoing at the next election.
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26-06-2018, 08:15   #32
eastwest
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Just biding their time until Canney is no longer relevant when it will be quietly dropped. Everyone knows it's out of the question.

Why Canney hasn't done a massive U turn on this is bizarre. There seems to be a clear appetite in Tuam for a greenway on the old line judging by the events of the weekend and it could very well be his undoing at the next election.
If you look at the west on track website it all becomes a bit clearer. Sean Canney has been associated with WOT pretty much since he got involved in politics, and has his colours nailed firmly to the WOT mast. His loyalty to the rail lobby is obviously much stronger than his loyalty to the people who elect him, but as you say, he will pay a price for that.
The mood in Tuam appears to be very much for the greenway, judging by recent 'direct action' in particular. Logic is slowly overcoming rhetoric, it seems.
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26-06-2018, 09:11   #33
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Just biding their time until Canney is no longer relevant when it will be quietly dropped. Everyone knows it's out of the question.

Why Canney hasn't done a massive U turn on this is bizarre. There seems to be a clear appetite in Tuam for a greenway on the old line judging by the events of the weekend and it could very well be his undoing at the next election.
Popular Tuam based, Cllr Peter Roache has been selected for FG in Galway East. The question with the Canney dissatisfaction camp was always where these votes might go, and how this would effect him. At least 1,000 Tuam town centric votes. Roache has already showed ahead of Canney in opinion polls. With Cannon looking set to pull a sizable surplus, this is big trouble for Canney. Too late for a Greenway U-turn and Ross has thrown his Rail report in the waste paper basket.
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26-06-2018, 11:06   #34
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Ross has thrown his Rail report in the waste paper basket.
Ah so, he has a strategy to take things forward! Thought as much.
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26-06-2018, 18:21   #35
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Popular Tuam based, Cllr Peter Roache has been selected for FG in Galway East. The question with the Canney dissatisfaction camp was always where these votes might go, and how this would effect him. At least 1,000 Tuam town centric votes. Roache has already showed ahead of Canney in opinion polls. With Cannon looking set to pull a sizable surplus, this is big trouble for Canney. Too late for a Greenway U-turn and Ross has thrown his Rail report in the waste paper basket.
From the Connacht Tribune report quoted earlier in the thread:
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It shows that Minister Ciaran Cannon of Fine Gael topping the poll on 18.4% of the vote – an increase of almost 3% on his performance last time out.

Fianna Fail’s Deputy Anne Rabbitte is on 16.6% which is a slight increase on her 2016 vote while Deputy Canney is back on 16% which is a drop of almost 2.5%.

But the surprise package in this whole scenario is the performance of Fine Gael’s Cllr Pete Roche who polled 15.6% of first preferences which would put him in with ‘a fighting chance’ of taking the third seat.

And close behind is Fianna Fail’s Cllr Donagh Killilea on a very respectable 15% but he has not decided if he will contest the party convention which is due to be held in the autumn.
All four are firmly in The Greenway camp.
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28-06-2018, 13:01   #36
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I don't disagree with some of his vision but his pitch is rambling and incoherent. Double track Athenry to Galway and then on to Athlone to Dublin is a simple and understandable demand but his performance on Newstalk yesterday was embarrassing. I wonder what was that comment from the "Boyle listener" that they couldn't read out, but the presenter found very funny??

http://connachttribune.ie/galway-needs-rail-link-boost/
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29-06-2018, 22:50   #37
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The trouble with rail freight today is that we have long passed the tipping point, yards and gantries swept away, staff gone, sidings gone, wagons gone, locomotives..blah, blah, blah. It has little to do with distances being too short or the so-called motorway network and more to do with the State paying lip service to the railways, carbon emissions etc.etc. blah, blah.
Rail freight was C19.

Diesel Road freight was C20

The coming age will see hybrid and electric freight, it is only a matter of time.
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29-06-2018, 22:55   #38
eastwest
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Rail freight was C19.

Diesel Road freight was C20

The coming age will see hybrid and electric freight, it is only a matter of time.
Once they start mining coal in Ballina it will all come right.
In the meantime, the freight we want coming out of Mayo is measured in bytes and not tonnes.
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01-07-2018, 16:16   #39
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Once they start mining coal in Ballina it will all come right.
In the meantime, the freight we want coming out of Mayo is measured in bytes and not tonnes.
Meanwhile, right here in Ballina, Coke are expanding and that will mean more tons being exported from Ballina.

The way to bump up rail capacity is of course not the western railway, but rather cos-effective measures on the mainline, ie extra passing loops, etc.
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01-07-2018, 18:57   #40
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Meanwhile, right here in Ballina, Coke are expanding and that will mean more tons being exported from Ballina.

The way to bump up rail capacity is of course not the western railway, but rather cos-effective measures on the mainline, ie extra passing loops, etc.
I'm not sure how much coca cola freight is coming out of Ballina, but I'd hazard a guess that it's no more than one train a day. The notion that this would justify a second line to Mayo is simply not based on reality.
As you rightly say, a few passing loops will cater for any expansion, as will Irish Rail's trialling of longer trains.
A second line is not only not needed, it would just be a complete waste if coca cola pulls out of Ballina, which they inevitably will. Remember Asahi?
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01-07-2018, 19:35   #41
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Meanwhile, right here in Ballina, Coke are expanding and that will mean more tons being exported from Ballina.

The way to bump up rail capacity is of course not the western railway, but rather cos-effective measures on the mainline, ie extra passing loops, etc.
Coke certainly have no interest in shipping from anywhere but east coast ports, so necessity to use claremorrris - Athenry is meaningless for them. The extra passing loops is something many of us pro-greenway, pro-tourism, pro-meaningful railway development have advocated for a long time. I see Eamon O'Cuiv quoted a couple of posts up has started talking some sense about double tracking on the Athlone-Galway line, was he still wittering on about the WRC as well? Ah well I guess sooner or later they will be put out to grass.
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01-07-2018, 19:46   #42
marno21
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Coke certainly have no interest in shipping from anywhere but east coast ports, so necessity to use claremorrris - Athenry is meaningless for them. The extra passing loops is something many of us pro-greenway, pro-tourism, pro-meaningful railway development have advocated for a long time. I see Eamon O'Cuiv quoted a couple of posts up has started talking some sense about double tracking on the Athlone-Galway line, was he still wittering on about the WRC as well? Ah well I guess sooner or later they will be put out to grass.
I think monument is agreeing with you there westtip.

As has been said, the Claremorris-Athenry section is not a requirement for increased freight operations from Ballina. The existing railway is very much underused and with passing loops there could be a lot more value achieved from the existing asset (e.g. Portarlington-Athlone-Manulla-Ballina).

Hopefully there is enhanced freight ops and it helps strengthen the case for double tracking Portarlington-Athlone which would be very beneficial for passenger services also.
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17-07-2018, 20:37   #43
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http://www.mayonews.ie/news/32369-ta...ropean-funding

Leo Varadkar - "But it’s important to say two things. The big single investment that happened in transport in Ireland in the last seven years was the Gort to Tuam motorway … Anyone that is saying that rural Ireland was somehow mistreated compared to other parts of the country really isn’t speaking on the basis of facts …
“There is also a misunderstanding about Ten-T. Some people seem to think that Ten-T is a big pot of money that we can draw down money for roads and railways. It’s not like structural funds. If you include something on the core network of Ten-T you have to build it and you might get a bit of money from the European Union for it. However, the chances are that the projects that get funding are ones that are trans-European, ones that are cross-border projects for example ports and airports. There isn’t a pot of European money to invest in Irish roads and railways anymore. That era is over."

" However, Kealan Flynn, a leading authority on the matter and a former Government advisor, said the Taoiseach’s comments are contradictory. It was Mr Flynn’s Freedom of Information request which revealed, earlier this year, that Mr Varadkar had removed the Western Arc from the Core network in 2011 and brought the issue to national prominence.
“The Taoiseach seems to be at sixes and sevens on the Ten-T,” he told The Mayo News. “On the one hand, he’s saying, mistakenly as it happens, that there is no pot of European money for road and rail infrastructure. On the other, he’s promising to keep the pledge in the Programme for Government, to reapply to get the Western Arc/Atlantic Corridor put back on the EU’s Ten-T Core road, rail, port and airport network map. Which is it? And why is the application still sitting in Dublin two years after it was meant to be sent to Brussels?
“The EU is investing €500 billion in multi-modal (road, rail, airport and sea port) transport infrastructure from 2014-2020, with a further €250 billion needed to finish the Ten-T Core Corridors by 2030. It’s worrying to hear the Taoiseach say the cross-border element doesn’t exist because Northern Ireland is not a trans-European route. It is. And what is the Brexit backstop for, if it isn’t to protect and defend the special relationship and the all-island economy that requires these trans-European links?
“Europe is joining the dots – and handing Ireland the pencil. Last May, Ten-T leader Brian Simpson said funding rules were being rewritten for peripheral regions. The EU is now proposing an investment package for a new maritime route to Europe via Cork and Waterford or Rosslare, as the UK will no longer be a common transit area after Brexit. This is to upgrade port and supporting infrastructure, including rail and road. On funding opportunities, Mr Simpson said: “The reality for Ireland now is, in order to get EU money, you have to apply for it. You’re pushing an open door with me. If you do not apply for the funding you will not get it, so please apply.”
“For the Taoiseach to say there is no more EU funding, is to miss both the point and the opportunity. Ireland should grab, not spurn, the opportunities and partnerships,” said Mr Flynn."
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17-07-2018, 21:26   #44
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Does this mean that the Waterford/Rosslare Strand line will be reopening or is it needed for a Greenway?
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18-07-2018, 11:39   #45
eastwest
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http://www.mayonews.ie/news/32369-ta...ropean-funding

Leo Varadkar - "But it’s important to say two things. The big single investment that happened in transport in Ireland in the last seven years was the Gort to Tuam motorway … Anyone that is saying that rural Ireland was somehow mistreated compared to other parts of the country really isn’t speaking on the basis of facts …
“There is also a misunderstanding about Ten-T. Some people seem to think that Ten-T is a big pot of money that we can draw down money for roads and railways. It’s not like structural funds. If you include something on the core network of Ten-T you have to build it and you might get a bit of money from the European Union for it. However, the chances are that the projects that get funding are ones that are trans-European, ones that are cross-border projects for example ports and airports. There isn’t a pot of European money to invest in Irish roads and railways anymore. That era is over."

" However, Kealan Flynn, a leading authority on the matter and a former Government advisor, said the Taoiseach’s comments are contradictory. It was Mr Flynn’s Freedom of Information request which revealed, earlier this year, that Mr Varadkar had removed the Western Arc from the Core network in 2011 and brought the issue to national prominence.
“The Taoiseach seems to be at sixes and sevens on the Ten-T,” he told The Mayo News. “On the one hand, he’s saying, mistakenly as it happens, that there is no pot of European money for road and rail infrastructure. On the other, he’s promising to keep the pledge in the Programme for Government, to reapply to get the Western Arc/Atlantic Corridor put back on the EU’s Ten-T Core road, rail, port and airport network map. Which is it? And why is the application still sitting in Dublin two years after it was meant to be sent to Brussels?
“The EU is investing €500 billion in multi-modal (road, rail, airport and sea port) transport infrastructure from 2014-2020, with a further €250 billion needed to finish the Ten-T Core Corridors by 2030. It’s worrying to hear the Taoiseach say the cross-border element doesn’t exist because Northern Ireland is not a trans-European route. It is. And what is the Brexit backstop for, if it isn’t to protect and defend the special relationship and the all-island economy that requires these trans-European links?
“Europe is joining the dots – and handing Ireland the pencil. Last May, Ten-T leader Brian Simpson said funding rules were being rewritten for peripheral regions. The EU is now proposing an investment package for a new maritime route to Europe via Cork and Waterford or Rosslare, as the UK will no longer be a common transit area after Brexit. This is to upgrade port and supporting infrastructure, including rail and road. On funding opportunities, Mr Simpson said: “The reality for Ireland now is, in order to get EU money, you have to apply for it. You’re pushing an open door with me. If you do not apply for the funding you will not get it, so please apply.”
“For the Taoiseach to say there is no more EU funding, is to miss both the point and the opportunity. Ireland should grab, not spurn, the opportunities and partnerships,” said Mr Flynn."
Does Mr flynn not get it? An Taoiseach was pointing out that any infrastructure funding on that route will go into the N17. Apart from making the most sense, this is what most people want.
Nobody is going to rebuild a victorian railway that nobody was using. When will that sink in with the few remaining diehards?
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