Quote:
Originally Posted by Fathom View Post
Not all are male rehashes. Perhaps there will be more uniquely female leading role examples as social change gradually and structurally occurs over time? For example. Watched the film "Let Me In" (2010) yesterday. It's an American remake of the Swedish "Let the right one in" (2008). The lead role appears to be a twelve-year-old female. Or a character that appears to be a female vampire in appearance and role behavior. Her age 12 male counterpart was called a girl by bullying male classmates. She tells him to fight back. Was this an example of role reversal ("rehash") or how a leading and strong female would confront bullying? it's complicated (excuse the cliche) but not a simple male role rehash by a female character.

Are we talking early Lara Croft (Angelina Jolie) or later Lara Croft (Alicia Vikander)? Both Tomb Raider games and films have changed over time in character appearances and female role behaviors.
I do wonder if the lack of female hero’s is down to the general idea that woman don’t fight (in comparison to men, how many woman faught in wars?) and generally don’t do physical jobs as much as men so we don’t really associate them with physical roles in general?!

In fact just thinking about it why isn’t there more female philosophers or famous scientists or even inventors? Was that down to society forcing a role on woman? Should we expect this to change remarkably over the coming decades?

I suppose I’m just wondering if there is a sub conscious backlash of sorts to woman super hero’s because they don’t feel “earned”? There are many quality traits one could associate with woman over men but from a biological perspective being stronger physically is not one.

I’m not implying that above is correct , I am only trying to ascertain why we have such poor “hero’s” for woman characters in comparison to their male counterparts. Will the efforts to make things more “equal” change perceptions and provide a more balanced alternative?