Boards.ie uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Click here to find out more x
Post Reply  
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
08-11-2018, 23:56   #31
topper75
Registered User
 
topper75's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 4,159
Quote:
Originally Posted by jacdaniel2014 View Post
Went to New York a few years back, absolutely hated it, no desire to return ever. The people are a large part of the reason why. Everybody was miserable and even more zombie like than Dublin.

Everything was driven by money, again even more so than here.
Why oh why oh why do Irish go to one of the eastern cities and think they have seen America?

They are ludicrously unrepresentative of the rural interior. If you want to see America - go south or west, or ideally both. There is nowhere like it on earth. Mindblowing.
topper75 is offline  
Advertisement
08-11-2018, 23:57   #32
Black Swan
Category Moderator
 
Black Swan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Fifth Estate
Posts: 35,695
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammajamma View Post
Imagine the idea of rearing children there, eeesh! Anyone else have the same inkling, especially from younger people? Or completely different point of view?
I crossed the pond a few years back, and while I often miss Eire, I would not say that America is uniformly trashed by past and present politics or "issues." Just like any nation, it has its Troubles that on occasion come to the surface and must be endured, along with a grand laugh at the latest appearance of the Baby Balloon.

There are bright spots too that also endure in America year-after-year that herald the coming of millions of Irish immigrants to its shores, they in turn becoming a vital resource to build that nation. And there is fun shared too on a national scale. Where will you be on 17 March 2019, when a whole nation celebrates the Irish on a national holiday, and may do so by tipping many a glass in salute, or just fun, of Guinness or Harp or Jameson or Bushmills (or whatever is your choice of Irish brew)? Of the 195 nations in the world today, aside from Eire itself, how many nations celebrate the Irish every year on St Paddy's Day? It would be grand to be at St James Gate, but also you could have a good time across the pond on Rush and Division at the appointed hour not far from a river dyed green and an earlier Miracle Mile parade.

Just my 2 euros (or bucks for now).
Black Swan is offline  
08-11-2018, 23:58   #33
sdanseo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Co. Dublin 20m ASL
Posts: 7,677
Been 3 times in 10 years, most recently this month to CA and NV. Vegas is probably the most extreme example of American excess and lack of restraint.

The US is nice in small doses and the service / hospitality culture is certainly better, staff are friendlier albeit for the tips.

Society though is absolutely broken. Specifically I witnessed it in LA and San Diego but I'm sure in all the major cities there were homeless people everywhere some with very obvious mental health issues. No bar below which no one can fall as in Europe (not that lately, we've been much better).

I don't think I could ever live there permanently.
sdanseo is offline  
08-11-2018, 23:59   #34
Kitty6277
Registered User
 
Kitty6277's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Tipperary
Posts: 2,900
I've not been to America yet, but as things stand, I'd go there for a holiday but have no desire to ever live there. I will definitely move out of Ireland at some point, but it won't be to America. Not sure exactly of my reasons for that, I just don't feel like it's somewhere I'd like to live
Kitty6277 is offline  
09-11-2018, 00:02   #35
mikhail gorbachev2
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Swan View Post
I crossed the pond a few years back, and while I often miss Eire, I would not say that America is uniformly trashed by past and present politics or "issues." Just like any nation, it has its Troubles that on occasion come to the surface and must be endured, along with a grand laugh at the latest appearance of the Baby Balloon.

There are bright spots too that also endure in America year-after-year that herald the coming of millions of Irish immigrants to its shores, they in turn becoming a vital resource to build that nation. And there is fun shared too on a national scale. Where will you be on 17 March 2019, when a whole nation celebrates the Irish on a national holiday, and may do so by tipping many a glass in salute, or just fun, of Guinness or Harp or Jameson or Bushmills (or whatever is your choice of Irish brew)? Of the 195 nations in the world today, aside from Eire itself, how many nations celebrate the Irish every year on St Paddy's Day? It would be grand to be at St James Gate, but also you could have a good time across the pond on Rush and Division at the appointed hour not far from a river dyed green and an earlier Miracle Mile parade.

Just my 2 euros (or bucks for now).
i believe ya mate
i would love to go over even for a month
mikhail gorbachev2 is offline  
Thanks from:
Advertisement
09-11-2018, 01:38   #36
Princess Consuela Bananahammock
Registered User
 
Princess Consuela Bananahammock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: The Hammock Complex - it's on Third.
Posts: 23,152
No interest in going, not even for a holiday.

Seems to be a much more aggressive place than it used to be (and not just since Trump guy in, but he hasn't helped) and not as free add they'd have you believe if you were to live there.
Princess Consuela Bananahammock is offline  
Thanks from:
09-11-2018, 04:27   #37
Manic Moran
Moderator
 
Manic Moran's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Dublin, California
Posts: 13,137
Quote:
Originally Posted by topper75 View Post
Why oh why oh why do Irish go to one of the eastern cities and think they have seen America?

They are ludicrously unrepresentative of the rural interior. If you want to see America - go south or west, or ideally both. There is nowhere like it on earth. Mindblowing.
This. Or San Fancisco.

San Francisco has a very serious image problem which nobody wants to talk about. https://www.sfchronicle.com/news/art...t-12534954.php or https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/...s-13038748.php

Yet despite that, folks doing the tourist thing go to the big cities. I guess it’s understandable, they are centers of culture and it’s where the airports are. How many folks have actually explored the rest of the US?

I just finished a road trip this week, going San Francisco to Vegas to San Antonio. Discovered a delightful spot for dinner in Flagstaff, AZ. Which itself is a very pretty town, and it doesn’t seem to have much of a homeless problem, doesn’t have potholes, and has friendly people. My accent bemused the guys in the wheel repair shop in Clovis, New Mexico, I may well have been the first Irishman to ever set foot in the place when I drove in three days ago, but they checked out my wheel for me cheerfully and without cost when I swung by, whilst having a conversation. Who has been to Cheyenne, WY? It’s easy to get to, it’s on I-80. I learned to fly in Elizabethtown, Kentucky, a nice friendly quiet part of the US, and about as far in style from New York as possible. As of next week, I will no longer be living in Dublin, California, but though it’s only 35 miles from San Francisco, it is an entirely different way of life, and I though I doubt I could ever live in SF, Dublin is great. I drive transcontinental again (my 6th time doing it) week, places like Phoenix and El Paso are on my route. And even at that, those are the cities, it’s sometimes worth just pulling off into small towns off the motorway. Dinner three nights ago was in Brownwood, TX. I had never heard of the place, would never try to visit it, but it’s still a nice part of the US.

But it’s “I went to New York City and didn’t like it”. That’s fair. I hate NYC as well. But I love living in the US. Just in partof the 99% of the country which is not high density urban area.

Perhaps the greatest irony is that the least pleasant parts of the US tend to be the parts with which folks on Boards tend to be the most supportive. (High taxes, heavily Democrat, etc).

Last edited by Manic Moran; 09-11-2018 at 04:32.
Manic Moran is offline  
09-11-2018, 06:52   #38
ardinn
Registered User
 
ardinn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 3,421
Quote:
Originally Posted by riclad View Post
ireland is Booming ,why go to america to get an average job.
IF you get sick and you don,t have good health insurance ,
it,ll cost a fortune, to get medical care .
At least in ireland , there are not mass shootings every month .
There seems to be floods , hurricanes , every month in america.
We have fast internet, cable tv , the only thing america has over ireland is good weather ,sunshine .
American infrastructure ,roads ,bridges are neglected ,
so they can give more tax cuts to the rich, and buy more nuclear weapons.
America is more corrupt under trumps government,
the laws are written for the rich and large corporations.
one example, they passed a law so isps can sell anyones browsing history to advertisers .
so f u to consumers privacey.
it.s the land of the free , where people go to jail cos they cant pay for bail, or for just smoking hash .

In the 70,s and the 80s, america looked great ,compared
with ireland where we had 3 tv stations ,
3 or 4 radio stations .
Now we have fast internet, 100,s of tv stations and music streaming
on phones .
we have caught up with america in regard to tech and media.
So why go there .
Why support an extreme conservative with your dollars ?
The average person is more free in ireland than someone in the us .
I,m not saying its a bad country to live in, IF you have a good job and are earning a high salary .
I,M not sure if the social structure or the economy or the environment in america can survive on another 5 years of trump government.
There,s a limit of how much even the american government can borrow .


Sorry - But is this supposed to be a poem?
ardinn is offline  
09-11-2018, 07:00   #39
Mountainsandh
Registered User
 
Mountainsandh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: countryside, South East
Posts: 6,219
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manic Moran View Post
This. Or San Fancisco.

San Francisco has a very serious image problem which nobody wants to talk about. https://www.sfchronicle.com/news/art...t-12534954.php or https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/...s-13038748.php

Yet despite that, folks doing the tourist thing go to the big cities. I guess it’s understandable, they are centers of culture and it’s where the airports are. How many folks have actually explored the rest of the US?

I just finished a road trip this week, going San Francisco to Vegas to San Antonio. Discovered a delightful spot for dinner in Flagstaff, AZ. Which itself is a very pretty town, and it doesn’t seem to have much of a homeless problem, doesn’t have potholes, and has friendly people. My accent bemused the guys in the wheel repair shop in Clovis, New Mexico, I may well have been the first Irishman to ever set foot in the place when I drove in three days ago, but they checked out my wheel for me cheerfully and without cost when I swung by, whilst having a conversation. Who has been to Cheyenne, WY? It’s easy to get to, it’s on I-80. I learned to fly in Elizabethtown, Kentucky, a nice friendly quiet part of the US, and about as far in style from New York as possible. As of next week, I will no longer be living in Dublin, California, but though it’s only 35 miles from San Francisco, it is an entirely different way of life, and I though I doubt I could ever live in SF, Dublin is great. I drive transcontinental again (my 6th time doing it) week, places like Phoenix and El Paso are on my route. And even at that, those are the cities, it’s sometimes worth just pulling off into small towns off the motorway. Dinner three nights ago was in Brownwood, TX. I had never heard of the place, would never try to visit it, but it’s still a nice part of the US.

But it’s “I went to New York City and didn’t like it”. That’s fair. I hate NYC as well. But I love living in the US. Just in partof the 99% of the country which is not high density urban area.

Perhaps the greatest irony is that the least pleasant parts of the US tend to be the parts with which folks on Boards tend to be the most supportive. (High taxes, heavily Democrat, etc).
We were in the Road Kill Cafe in Seligman (AZ), and had a grand old chat with a lady there, who on hearing that my kids were Irish, from a French mother, was mightily impressed that they could speak French, Irish, and had what she said with awe, fluent English .... (my kids wouldn't really say that they can "speak" Irish)
She said she knew about Scotland, and how lucky we were we could just head off for a drive there whenever we fancied.

In Rachel in the Little Ale'Inn (alien highway), some guy and his family on a fun trip smiled at us and asked if we were there for the folk-lore/social commentary-type interest in the area, or if we were believers (in the whole Area 51 myth). We somewhat embarrassingly admitted it was for the whole fun of it (and social/lore aspect), and he agreed it was great fun drinking in the crazyness sometimes, and directed us to one of the entrance gates.

In Cambria we met a gay couple with their Chihuahuas exhibiting their vintage car as they do yearly. They apologized profusely for Trump with a laugh and wished us a nice stay.

I've more stories for every place we stopped at, but no people stories from the big towns.
It's nice to get out of the big towns !
Mountainsandh is offline  
(2) thanks from:
Advertisement
09-11-2018, 13:00   #40
archer22
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,344
Americans are like knackers on steroids
archer22 is offline  
09-11-2018, 13:07   #41
JohnCleary
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 9,297
I'm a relatively well traveled person. When I meet with like-minded people, they're shocked that i've never flown West of Ireland (It's all Asia / SE Asia). Totally flabbergasted that I have no interested in visiting the US.

Sorry buddy, I travel to see new cultures / experiences. I really have no intention to travel to the US, despite many invitations from fellow travelers, colleagues, clients etc.

I still can't understand the tipping culture in the US. Pay the staff a working wage and absorb this in the menu price ffs.... not that hard!
JohnCleary is offline  
Thanks from:
09-11-2018, 13:10   #42
mad muffin
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 6,390
I was thinking about it today. America reminds me of a modern day feudal Japan.
mad muffin is online now  
09-11-2018, 13:12   #43
Grayson
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 1999
Posts: 13,071
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manic Moran View Post
This. Or San Fancisco.

San Francisco has a very serious image problem which nobody wants to talk about. https://www.sfchronicle.com/news/art...t-12534954.php or https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/...s-13038748.php

Yet despite that, folks doing the tourist thing go to the big cities. I guess it’s understandable, they are centers of culture and it’s where the airports are. How many folks have actually explored the rest of the US?

I just finished a road trip this week, going San Francisco to Vegas to San Antonio. Discovered a delightful spot for dinner in Flagstaff, AZ. Which itself is a very pretty town, and it doesn’t seem to have much of a homeless problem, doesn’t have potholes, and has friendly people. My accent bemused the guys in the wheel repair shop in Clovis, New Mexico, I may well have been the first Irishman to ever set foot in the place when I drove in three days ago, but they checked out my wheel for me cheerfully and without cost when I swung by, whilst having a conversation. Who has been to Cheyenne, WY? It’s easy to get to, it’s on I-80. I learned to fly in Elizabethtown, Kentucky, a nice friendly quiet part of the US, and about as far in style from New York as possible. As of next week, I will no longer be living in Dublin, California, but though it’s only 35 miles from San Francisco, it is an entirely different way of life, and I though I doubt I could ever live in SF, Dublin is great. I drive transcontinental again (my 6th time doing it) week, places like Phoenix and El Paso are on my route. And even at that, those are the cities, it’s sometimes worth just pulling off into small towns off the motorway. Dinner three nights ago was in Brownwood, TX. I had never heard of the place, would never try to visit it, but it’s still a nice part of the US.

But it’s “I went to New York City and didn’t like it”. That’s fair. I hate NYC as well. But I love living in the US. Just in partof the 99% of the country which is not high density urban area.

Perhaps the greatest irony is that the least pleasant parts of the US tend to be the parts with which folks on Boards tend to be the most supportive. (High taxes, heavily Democrat, etc).
There's also extreme poverty in a lot of those areas. It's not just the big cities. Having said that, I'm from the midlands here and I would love to see a small town in the interior and stay there for a week. I don't think you get to know much about a place by travelling through it.


BTW I spent my month in west Dublin/Pleasanton. I hated that place. It's like they got the west end retail park in blanch and decided to make it 20 miles long. Sure downtown Pls or Livermore is pretty but they're just islands in a gigantic sea of concrete. It's impossible to get anywhere unless you travel by car. The rents/property prices are ridiculous and it's honestly the least cultural place I've ever been. And there's that huge disparity in incomes. People either earn a fortune or they earn a pittance.

And the Bart makes the Dart look classy.
Grayson is offline  
Thanks from:
09-11-2018, 13:12   #44
Amirani
Moderator
 
Amirani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Dublin
Posts: 10,170
I've been to ~18 states through work or personal travel. It's a much more diverse country than many Europeans realise, and can be a very interesting place. It has a lot going for it, but also many problems.

There's certain parts that I wouldn't be against living for a short period, but I don't think I could ever consider it my long-term home. I prefer Ireland and Europe generally. I generally prefer travelling East of Ireland too, but there's room for both!
Amirani is offline  
Thanks from:
09-11-2018, 13:32   #45
RobertKK
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 28,876
The US is what you make of it, never had a problem with the people there, always got treated well. The national parks are a treasure and well worth visiting.
I have seen poverty like one would see in Dublin despite the wealth of the city.
I see some people here knocking something they never tried.
RobertKK is offline  
Thanks from:
Post Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Remove Text Formatting
Bold
Italic
Underline

Insert Image
Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text
 
Decrease Size
Increase Size
Please sign up or log in to join the discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



Share Tweet