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04-11-2018, 21:21   #16
Calhoun
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Taking the piss out of people on the autism spectrum, are there other syndromes you dislike? How about people with down syndrome?
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04-11-2018, 21:21   #17
CinemaGuy45
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Originally Posted by Yer Da sells Avon View Post
I think you're being very unfair. Perhaps to yourself? You said in another thread that you have Asperger's.
Thanks for blowing my cover so early on the thread.


I know the original post is correct as it describes me and I don't find it hurtful I find it insightful as I do my best to work around this.

You have ruined my thread I wanted to gauge peoples true impressions.
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04-11-2018, 21:23   #18
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I honestly don't know where to start with the Ops post. It smacks of a complete lack of knowledge and immaturity.

My son is 5 and has aspergers. Basically that means he has problems understanding social situations and what he can and cannot do.
What this involves is lots of training with him, home tuition teaching him and preparing him for school. Basically my son has been in a classroom since was 2.5 for 20 hours a week.
Its tough work and involves ourselves also teaching him over the years on how to behave etc.
Autistic children are bound to routines so its important to keep them to a routine.
He is prone to outbursts ie trying to get him to eat something that he doesn't like ie or doing something he doesn't like. This can result in him roaring and screaming and lashing out. It can be scary but its extremely upsetting for him too as he's too young to understand what's going on. All we can do is explain to him calmly and quietly what is happening and allow him to calm down. Now he's going to school and loves it. He's started out in a unit and they hope to merge him into mainstream and the school has a good record of merging special needs kids into mainstream school.
A lot of older people with aspergers never had this level of support hence why they stick out a lot more. Also they lack social niceties etc and can come across as uncaring and abrupt.
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04-11-2018, 21:24   #19
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Well first things first: a proper diagnosis should be confirmed before any condition is named. We seem to be living in a time where lots of people are armchair experts on everything. I remember watching a documentary on a murder trial (I forget who it was about) and one of the psychiatrists reminded everyone that shyness and odd behaviour do not always equal autism. In one way it's good that there is more understanding of these types of disorders nowadays, but on the other hand the terms themselves seem ripe to be used as weapons by trolls.
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04-11-2018, 21:24   #20
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Originally Posted by CinemaGuy45 View Post
A number of posters on this very board have it and they are a mixed bag.

A relatives son has it a friends grandson has it I work with a couple of people with it.
I notice some of those with the condition are prone to online trolling for the sake of attention seeking as they seem unable to interact with people in a normal way.

My impression of these people is that they are very annoying and emotionally immature.
They may seem intelligent but they seem to panic when they have to do anything outside their narrow comfort zone.

They seem to mess up all relationships and friendships that is if they can even form them in the first place.
They also come across as selfish and weird and they can ask the same question over and over again as if looking for reassurance.

Despite the PC version of the syndrome these people seem prone to mood swings and bursts of anger if they are pushed too far outside their comfort zone.

What are your impressions of people with Aspergers am I being unfair or am I being truthful?

Are these people weirdos creepy and annoying?
am very familiar with the issue ,

some can be intelligent articulate friendly helpful individuals

they should be entertained up to a point and beyond that treated with sympathy and then after that the same as anyone else

some can be self centered self absorbed ego eccentric man/woman children but so can politicians so what can you do ?
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04-11-2018, 21:25   #21
CinemaGuy45
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I honestly don't know where to start with the Ops post. It smacks of a complete lack of knowledge and immaturity.

My son is 5 and has aspergers. Basically that means he has problems understanding social situations and what he can and cannot do.
What this involves is lots of training with him, home tuition teaching him and preparing him for school. Basically my son has been in a classroom since was 2.5 for 20 hours a week.
Its tough work and involves ourselves also teaching him over the years on how to behave etc.
Autistic children are bound to routines so its important to keep them to a routine.
He is prone to outbursts ie trying to get him to eat something that he doesn't like ie or doing something he doesn't like. This can result in him roaring and screaming and lashing out. It can be scary but its extremely upsetting for him too as he's too young to understand what's going on. All we can do is explain to him calmly and quietly what is happening and allow him to calm down. Now he's going to school and loves it. He's started out in a unit and they hope to merge him into mainstream and the school has a good record of merging special needs kids into mainstream school.
A lot of older people with aspergers never had this level of support hence why they stick out a lot more. Also they lack social niceties etc and can come across as uncaring and abrupt.
I am an expert on the topic at this stage and I really hope for all the best for your son.
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04-11-2018, 21:26   #22
mikemac2
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I only know one person with aspergers. Hes fine , you mightnt even notice unless you knew him for a while. He just seems off, hes very blunt and will say things that hurt peoples feelings and not even know he did anything wrong, hes quite narcisstic and selfish though Im not sure if thats related to the condition, I think hes very mild/high functioning though
If someone has a diagnosis for Aspergers and acts like that in the workplace do they get a free pass? Can’t discipline me, it’s my condition
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04-11-2018, 21:26   #23
Jack Moore
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Originally Posted by Blazer View Post
I honestly don't know where to start with the Ops post. It smacks of a complete lack of knowledge and immaturity.

My son is 5 and has aspergers. Basically that means he has problems understanding social situations and what he can and cannot do.
What this involves is lots of training with him, home tuition teaching him and preparing him for school. Basically my son has been in a classroom since was 2.5 for 20 hours a week.
Its tough work and involves ourselves also teaching him over the years on how to behave etc.
Autistic children are bound to routines so its important to keep them to a routine.
He is prone to outbursts ie trying to get him to eat something that he doesn't like ie or doing something he doesn't like. This can result in him roaring and screaming and lashing out. It can be scary but its extremely upsetting for him too as he's too young to understand what's going on. All we can do is explain to him calmly and quietly what is happening and allow him to calm down. Now he's going to school and loves it. He's started out in a unit and they hope to merge him into mainstream and the school has a good record of merging special needs kids into mainstream school.
A lot of older people with aspergers never had this level of support hence why they stick out a lot more. Also they lack social niceties etc and can come across as uncaring and abrupt.
they dont come across that way they are that way.
my brother is like that hes 40 soon so he belongs to the untreated but itsvery very hard to understand how someone soo clever and soo sucessful can be soo hurtful and mean
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04-11-2018, 21:26   #24
Blazer
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Work in the lower rungs of IT. Obsessive sorts - mad into comics, Japanese cartoons, computer games. Wear combats, skateboard runners, hoodies and wallet chains. Questionable personal hygiene.
couldn't be further from the truth. A lot of them are highly qualified.
Its estimated that a huge percentage of specialist surgeons worldwide are on the spectrum and one of the reasons this is the case is because of their ocd personality.
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04-11-2018, 21:29   #25
CinemaGuy45
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couldn't be further from the truth. A lot of them are highly qualified.
Its estimated that a huge percentage of specialist surgeons worldwide are on the spectrum and one of the reasons this is the case is because of their ocd personality.
Some are unemployed and unemployable some are just average scratch that most of them are average and a few of them are at genius level.
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04-11-2018, 21:29   #26
nullzero
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Originally Posted by CinemaGuy45 View Post
A number of posters on this very board have it and they are a mixed bag.

A relatives son has it a friends grandson has it I work with a couple of people with it.
I notice some of those with the condition are prone to online trolling for the sake of attention seeking as they seem unable to interact with people in a normal way.

My impression of these people is that they are very annoying and emotionally immature.
They may seem intelligent but they seem to panic when they have to do anything outside their narrow comfort zone.

They seem to mess up all relationships and friendships that is if they can even form them in the first place.
They also come across as selfish and weird and they can ask the same question over and over again as if looking for reassurance.

Despite the PC version of the syndrome these people seem prone to mood swings and bursts of anger if they are pushed too far outside their comfort zone.

What are your impressions of people with Aspergers am I being unfair or am I being truthful?

Are these people weirdos creepy and annoying?
I'm not sure what you've outlined is a reasonable representation of aspergers syndrome, particularly in relation to online posting habits. It's as if you're using that as a stick to beat people who disagree with you with.
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04-11-2018, 21:30   #27
batgoat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CinemaGuy45 View Post
A number of posters on this very board have it and they are a mixed bag.

A relatives son has it a friends grandson has it I work with a couple of people with it.
I notice some of those with the condition are prone to online trolling for the sake of attention seeking as they seem unable to interact with people in a normal way.

My impression of these people is that they are very annoying and emotionally immature.
They may seem intelligent but they seem to panic when they have to do anything outside their narrow comfort zone.

They seem to mess up all relationships and friendships that is if they can even form them in the first place.
They also come across as selfish and weird and they can ask the same question over and over again as if looking for reassurance.

Despite the PC version of the syndrome these people seem prone to mood swings and bursts of anger if they are pushed too far outside their comfort zone.

What are your impressions of people with Aspergers am I being unfair or am I being truthful?

Are these people weirdos creepy and annoying?
Okay, so you seem to think those with aspergers are 'weirdos creepy and annoying'. You come across as incredibly judgmental and immature on a topic that you have a pretty minimal understanding. Thanks for clearing up that being 'anti pc' is voicing ignorant opinions though!

Just to clear it up, it's classified as a ' developmental disorder' and not a disease.

Last edited by dudara; 05-11-2018 at 07:20.
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04-11-2018, 21:31   #28
Mam of 4
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I am an expert on the topic at this stage and I really hope for all the best for your son.
Tbh , you're an expert on the topic in how it is for you , not for everyone else with a diagnosis of AS . No two people are the same in how it affects them .
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04-11-2018, 21:31   #29
Blazer
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they dont come across that way they are that way.
my brother is like that hes 40 soon so he belongs to the untreated but itsvery very hard to understand how someone soo clever and soo sucessful can be soo hurtful and mean
The best way I can describe is as follows.
Aspergers don't feel the same as you or I. They have to basically learn how to fake social manners so as not to stick out and it involves years of training for them to understand why someone might be upset at something they said or did.
The government barely support special needs as it is so someone in their 40s would have received no help or support whatsoever.
You should read more into it in that it will help you understand what your brother goes through and how it might help your relationship with him.
Some presenter's son over in the UK got a role as an actor in one of the soaps.
She was asked would he be able to act and her reply was " he's been acting his whole life trying to fit in with normal people".
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04-11-2018, 21:31   #30
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Originally Posted by CinemaGuy45 View Post
A number of posters on this very board have it and they are a mixed bag.
As is everyone else on Boards.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CinemaGuy45 View Post
A relatives son has it a friends grandson has it I work with a couple of people with it.
I notice some of those with the condition are prone to online trolling for the sake of attention seeking as they seem unable to interact with people in a normal way.
To some this post could be considered trolling.


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Originally Posted by CinemaGuy45 View Post
My impression of these people is that they are very annoying and emotionally immature.
Your impression doesn't mean it's fact. There are plenty of annoying and immature people in life, not all of them have Aspergers


Quote:
Originally Posted by CinemaGuy45 View Post
They may seem intelligent but they seem to panic when they have to do anything outside their narrow comfort zone.
Define intelligent, and again a lot of people struggle when having to go beyond their comfort zones, it's sort of the definition of "comfort zone"



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Originally Posted by CinemaGuy45 View Post
They seem to mess up all relationships and friendships that is if they can even form them in the first place.
Perhaps they weren't true friendships then?


Quote:
Originally Posted by CinemaGuy45 View Post
They also come across as selfish and weird and they can ask the same question over and over again as if looking for reassurance.
Again selfishness is more common than Aspergers, and so is asking questions until you understand the answers given?

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Originally Posted by CinemaGuy45 View Post
Despite the PC version of the syndrome these people seem prone to mood swings and bursts of anger if they are pushed too far outside their comfort zone.
Wouldn't you get angry and upset if people constantly failed to understand you and insisted you do things their way?

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Originally Posted by CinemaGuy45 View Post
What are your impressions of people with Aspergers am I being unfair or am I being truthful?
You are being unfair in that you are saying everyone with Aspergers is the same, they aren't. They are unique individuals with skills in some areas and not others...just like everyone else.


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Are these people weirdos creepy and annoying?
Do you think it's okay to call someone with a condition that they have little control over a weirdo? creepy? annoying? Frankly it says more about your personality than theirs.
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