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29-06-2020, 11:11   #1
martin18
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Can we make an offer on a property under another name?

Hello there, we are looking to move to a specific small town out west and buy a home there. However, quite a few of the asking prices seem unrealistic (and many have been on the market for ages, even years). We'd like to try and offer a fair bit below the asking price on a few of them but we are wary of upsetting people in the area, which would not be a good idea in a small town you plan to live in for many years.

Having never bought a home before, we're wondering if it might be possible to make an offer through a friend with a different surname - that way if it's rejected it won't blow back on us. Is that legally possible do you think?

Thanks a million.
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29-06-2020, 11:15   #2
duffman13
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Originally Posted by martin18 View Post
Hello there, we are looking to move to a specific small town out west and buy a home there. However, quite a few of the asking prices seem unrealistic (and many have been on the market for ages, even years). We'd like to try and offer a fair bit below the asking price on a few of them but we are wary of upsetting people in the area, which would not be a good idea in a small town you plan to live in for many years.

Having never bought a home before, we're wondering if it might be possible to make an offer through a friend with a different surname - that way if it's rejected it won't blow back on us. Is that legally possible do you think?

Thanks a million.
To be honest, when buying our house and selling at no stage would either estate identify the purchaser/seller due to GDPR. There is no good reason the person selling needs to know, you can always bid on a property under the preface of anonymity. Alternatively you could engage an agent to do it on your behalf. Id guess in a small town though you might see information leaking out
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29-06-2020, 11:20   #3
martin18
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Thanks a million, Duffman, very helpful. But maybe I can bring you further back to the basics as honestly we are starting out after living overseas and have pretty much no idea how the buying process works here at home.

When you refer to "estate", who is that exactly given that noone is representing us?
I thought buyers submitted offers directly rather than through the solicitor?
How would anonymity work exactly?
Submitting offers via a friend doesn't sound like an option then?

thanks again!
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29-06-2020, 11:23   #4
Geuze
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Potential buyers submit offers to the estate agent representing the seller.

The estate agent does not pass any names to the vendor.

I sold a house during last five years.

I never knew the name of the buyer.

I had no reason to see or know their name.

It may have been on the contract, and I could maybe have had that on front of me for 1 minute.
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29-06-2020, 11:28   #5
martin18
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Oh lovely, Geuze, see my knowledge is at a very basic level!

I'm 99% sure in this case, though that our name would get through if we went directly to the estate agent in this town. So what could we do to preserve anonymity under those circumstances, anyone?
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29-06-2020, 11:39   #6
Geuze
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Oh lovely, Geuze, see my knowledge is at a very basic level!

I'm 99% sure in this case, though that our name would get through if we went directly to the estate agent in this town. So what could we do to preserve anonymity under those circumstances, anyone?

You walk into house during viewing.

Agent is in the house.

You do this twice.

You chat with agent.

You make an offer.

Yes, the agent will want your name / e-mail / phone number.

The agent may ask about AIP.

The agent should not pass your personal details to the vendor.

What the agent will want to suss out is:

are you a serious buyer?
are you in a chain?
do you have the funds?
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29-06-2020, 11:41   #7
awec
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You could probably engage a solicitor to engage with the agent for you but it would be expensive.

Last edited by awec; 29-06-2020 at 11:50.
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29-06-2020, 11:47   #8
3DataModem
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As awec says, get the solicitor to bid on your behalf. Plenty of people do this.
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29-06-2020, 13:15   #9
martin18
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Thanks very much again. So it would have to be a solicitor rather than a friend, even before offer is accepted?
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29-06-2020, 13:19   #10
awec
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Thanks very much again. So it would have to be a solicitor rather than a friend, even before offer is accepted?
I think it would need to be a solicitor for the estate agent to think you're a serious buyer.
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29-06-2020, 13:21   #11
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I'd go have a sit-down chat with the local estate agents before you start putting in bids. They'll tell you what can be bought for what price. They know some sellers won't budge etc. It's good to get a relationship going and they'll know your genuine.
Where out west you looking I'm noticing prices climb along the west coast.
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29-06-2020, 13:23   #12
KaneToad
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Thanks very much again. So it would have to be a solicitor rather than a friend, even before offer is accepted?
Doesn't have to be a solicitor, friend will suffice. There is very little regulation regarding house purchase/selling during the offer stages. I could offer 2 million for a property and then when the offer is accepted I can change my mind and offer 350k...

It's perfectly reasonable for an intermediary (friend) to view/make offer. Selling agent may, at a later date, look for proof of funds. There is no obligation to provide this. However there is no obligation for selling agent to accept your bid, even of it's highest, if they think the sale won't progress.

Your objective should be to satisfy the selling agent as to your bona fides while maintaining your anonymity. It can be done!
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29-06-2020, 13:25   #13
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I'd go have a sit-down chat with the local estate agents before you start putting in bids. They'll tell you what can be bought for what price. They know some sellers won't budge etc. It's good to get a relationship going and they'll know your genuine.
Where out west you looking I'm noticing prices climb along the west coast.
Don't forget the estate agent is acting for the seller, not the buyer! Their best interests lie in securing the best deal for their client (the seller!)
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29-06-2020, 13:27   #14
davo2001
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Why don't you just make the offer yourself and if it's rejected increase the offer? I don't really understand why you want to go down the cloak and dagger route!
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29-06-2020, 13:41   #15
drunkmonkey
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Don't forget the estate agent is acting for the seller, not the buyer! Their best interests lie in securing the best deal for their client (the seller!)
There trying to sell as well, if you can build up an initial rapport with them it's no harm. I don't trust them as far as I'd throw them, I know the last one was bull****ting me when a mystery bidder appeared the morning we'd hoped to close, drove me up nearly 20k in an hour but I played along we wanted the house and still thought it was good value and didn't want to get into a bidding war with anyone, was content to bid against the fake bidder as opposed to 20 real ones to get it off the market as quick as possible. We'd tried buying other ones in the area but there were just too many bidders.
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