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23-06-2020, 09:31   #46
beauf
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Originally Posted by seamus View Post
Electricity supply.

The ESB cannot cut off an occupied property for non-payment, and the regulator will crucify them if they did.

This is what happens when you're in the special category of sevice providers providing essental human needs. You have to accept the fact that the needs of the individual are more important than the profits of the business.
ESB can disconnect you in certain circumstances. Though this has been suspended for the lockdown. There's a good few threads on boards with people who have been cut off.

They won't reconnect unless the debt is paid. Even if the person trying to reconnect isn't the person who owns the debt.

Regulators are pretty useless in Ireland.
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23-06-2020, 09:31   #47
Pintman Paddy Losty
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Originally Posted by seamus View Post
There's a very simple solution for the OP here - go and rent.
How is he supposed to do that if he can't afford it? Particularly as his tenants sounds like a nightmare and probably isn't paying him rent?
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23-06-2020, 09:31   #48
Uncle Pierre
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Originally Posted by seamus View Post
Electricity supply.

The ESB cannot cut off an occupied property for non-payment, and the regulator will crucify them if they did.
Wrong.

Or at best, only partially (very partially) correct.

An electricity supply company can't cut off supply from elderly or vulnerable people during the winter months (think it's November to March), and can't cut the supply anytime from people who depend on electricity to run vital medical equipment.

But it's definitely not the case that they can't cut off supply from any occupied property for non-payment. If that were true, there'd be no need for any of us to ever pay our electricity bills.
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23-06-2020, 09:34   #49
Hairy Japanese BASTARDS!
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Finally, long overdue!

When it comes to your situation, you made an investment/bet, it didnt pay off. Why where you betting in the first place?
So you're promoting and advocating overholding a property (might be legal but morally wrong) and withholding of rent (illegal)?
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23-06-2020, 09:40   #50
beauf
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Originally Posted by seamus View Post
...
This is what happens when you're in the special category of sevice providers providing essental human needs. You have to accept the fact that the needs of the individual are more important than the profits of the business....
So if someone is renting out a million euro penthouses they are hardly an essential human need.

The issue is it's the govt who is responsible for supplying basic housing needs. Not the private sector. It's not right that the govt has forced the private sector into carrying the cost of social and low cost housing.
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23-06-2020, 09:45   #51
NuMarvel
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Originally Posted by Pintman Paddy Losty View Post
How is he supposed to do that if he can't afford it? Particularly as his tenants sounds like a nightmare and probably isn't paying him rent?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hairy Japanese BASTARDS! View Post
So you're promoting and advocating overholding a property (might be legal but morally wrong) and withholding of rent (illegal)?
The OP hasn't said that the tenant stopped paying their rent (yet anyway)
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23-06-2020, 10:37   #52
Claw Hammer
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Originally Posted by LeineGlas View Post
In fairness, it's very difficult to increase supply when it is so easy to object to development.
Objections aren't always upheld. In any case there doesn't need to be development to increase supply. There are many unoccupied and under occupied properties around. Little is being done about using under or unoccupied properties.
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23-06-2020, 10:40   #53
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The issue here is not serving a 1 month notice before the 6 months lease is up
Nor serving a 3 months notice after 6 months and a Day,

Both these risks were taken into account because these were written in the low so we are all aware of these

However the 4 months eviction ban and probably more has put me in a very unpleasant situation. If the eviction ban is extended until next year . What will happen to those who only rented short term and need their house back - have nowhere else to live. ?

what happens to rent arrears? sure if a tenant can live for free for a long time with no risk of being evicted why would't they?
I don't know what you mean by "written in the ow" but the reality is that you handed over your property to someone without a proper plan to recover it when you needed it. There was always a risk the tenant wouldn't vacate at the end of the lease.
If you are getting into letting and handing over control of property you need to anticipate all eventualities and have worked out how to deal with them.
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23-06-2020, 10:49   #54
Pkiernan
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Originally Posted by seamus View Post
Electricity supply.

The ESB cannot cut off an occupied property for non-payment, and the regulator will crucify them if they did.

This is what happens when you're in the special category of sevice providers providing essental human needs. You have to accept the fact that the needs of the individual are more important than the profits of the business.
You're incorrect.

If you refuse to pay your bill, you will be cut offm
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23-06-2020, 11:00   #55
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The left have always supported a blanket ban on evictions the corona virus was there wet dream to have it,
higher risk will continue reduce supply and 2/3 years down the line government will end up buying off the reits who paid no tax on the rents they took in will walk away with a healthy profit we will probably still be blaming "de banks"
Op you will get ur place back it will cost and take time but many threads here before advised against but the cv19 will complicate thing best you can hope they keep paying.
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23-06-2020, 11:14   #56
TheBoyConor
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seamus View Post
Electricity supply.

The ESB cannot cut off an occupied property for non-payment, and the regulator will crucify them if they did.

This is what happens when you're in the special category of sevice providers providing essental human needs. You have to accept the fact that the needs of the individual are more important than the profits of the business.
Was thinking that cannot be right.
If that was indeed the case, then why would anyone bother to pay their electricity bill?

Last edited by TheBoyConor; 23-06-2020 at 11:34.
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23-06-2020, 11:28   #57
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I'm surprised to learn that it counts as an eviction when the contract expires and you're asked to leave. They really have thought of everything.
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23-06-2020, 11:29   #58
beauf
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Originally Posted by Claw Hammer View Post
I don't know what you mean by "written in the ow" but the reality is that you handed over your property to someone without a proper plan to recover it when you needed it. There was always a risk the tenant wouldn't vacate at the end of the lease.
If you are getting into letting and handing over control of property you need to anticipate all eventualities and have worked out how to deal with them.

Whats a proper plan?

There is only one plan, the legal framework, which ties the LL hands behind their back.
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23-06-2020, 11:48   #59
phantasmagoria
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Past behaviour is the most accurate predictor of future behaviour. I think that in Ireland there seems to be an issue with recognizing who a good tenant is (or even who is a decent person - the type who isn't going to screw you over). I have seen first hand that you can have references from various different sources (long term, short term, agency, landlord, employment) aswell as statement of savings and employment confirmation and history and a landlord or an agent acting on their behalf will pass on you for a property letting. It makes no sense. The end result is that they end up with a bad tenant and it costs multiples of the rent. Landlords in most cases don't seem to realise that they are providing a service that a tenant is paying for and if they charge over the top rents, they are not treating their customer fairly. I have very little sympathy for somebody who rents out a 1 bed shoebox for €1800 and then wonders why they get taken advantage of when they cannot do their due diligence and recognise a bogey. I hope it works out for the OP but how did they end up with a nightmare tenant. There's enough demand out there for rental property and enough good tenants that if you end up with a bad tenant it's invariably your vetting that is the problem.
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23-06-2020, 11:55   #60
NuMarvel
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Whats a proper plan?

There is only one plan, the legal framework, which ties the LL hands behind their back.
That proves Claw's point. If you're going to become a landlord, and the laws make things difficult for landlords, then this should have been considered by the OP when deciding whether to be a landlord.
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