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05-12-2018, 18:24   #46
Trigger Happy
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How long does it take a coffin to decompose?
Don’t like the thought of my family’s bones on view at the next burial.
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05-12-2018, 18:47   #47
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Supposed to dig down four feet for animals. Sod that.
Years back we buried a dog in the garden, not sure how deep it was but not more than 2 feet. Three months later our new dog sniffed the bones and went and dug the whole grave up. Was pretty disgusting to see the entire rib cage with flies buzzing around it.
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05-12-2018, 18:51   #48
Galwayguy35
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How long does it take a coffin to decompose?
Don’t like the thought of my family’s bones on view at the next burial.
The gravediggers always make sure you won't see any of that.
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05-12-2018, 18:58   #49
Galwayguy35
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Still a tradition around here where the neighbours would dig the grave although some of the lads are getting on now and it's getting a bit harder to find help among the younger generation.

A relative of the deceased used to call to the graveyard with a bottle of whiskey and on the day of the burial the family would organise a bit of food for the lads closing the grave.
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05-12-2018, 19:36   #50
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Find yourself a few soldiers and/or council workers; they will have dug trenches in their basic training, unless modern soldiers don't dig them anymore. I certainly did in the 80s.
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05-12-2018, 19:55   #51
Melodeon
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The gravediggers always make sure you won't see any of that.
Yep, skeletal remains, item of clothing, coffin timbers and fittings, and anything else remotely 'artificial' encountered are usually discreetly hidden from view and reburied as the grave is filled later, or buried before the ceremony under the floor of the new grave.

The Hollywood version of digging a grave with bare hands or a bit of a stick is beyond laughable.
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05-12-2018, 19:56   #52
malinheader
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I have helped dig 5 or 6 graves for family members and friends. It seems to be all done by machine nowadays but at one time the family and community came together and three or four men would dig the grave. It was exceptionally hard work in some locations. Always followed by a good few drinks in the nearest bar with reminiscing about the deceased
Still done where im from too.
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05-12-2018, 20:21   #53
Schwiiing
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Easy pick out the soft city office boys who struggle to dig a hole to bury a dog.
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05-12-2018, 20:26   #54
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It's one of the essential country skills: 'How to successfully dispose of a corpse'
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05-12-2018, 20:26   #55
foxy farmer
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Yep, skeletal remains, item of clothing, coffin timbers and fittings, and anything else remotely 'artificial' encountered are usually discreetly hidden from view and reburied as the grave is filled later, or buried before the ceremony under the floor of the new grave.

The Hollywood version of digging a grave with bare hands or a bit of a stick is beyond laughable.
I always laugh where you see them breaking out the shovels and the ground is pure sand. You wouldn't go far digging a grave in Ireland without a pickaxe and a crowbar. A shovel on its own would be pointless.
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05-12-2018, 20:27   #56
Melodeon
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I always laugh where you see them breaking out the shovels and the ground is pure sand. You wouldn't go far digging a grave in Ireland without a pickaxe and a crowbar. A shovel on its own would be pointless.
And it's usually a square-ended pan shovel too!
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05-12-2018, 21:12   #57
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Bad luck? Where'd you hear that?
That is what is said down here.
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05-12-2018, 21:54   #58
ablelocks
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Around here it is all done by local neighbours
I have dug several of them, ....

Lucozade and water have replaced the bottle of whiskey due to drink driving.
same here. except for the whiskey. the wimmin bring food and whiskey towards the end of the dig and wait for d'men to finish and bring us home. or more usually to the pub. (Or Joe drives, but he'd only have had 2-3 whiskies.)
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05-12-2018, 22:04   #59
Obvious Desperate Breakfasts
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Supposed to dig down four feet for animals. Sod that.
Better for it to be a shallow grave. Past a foot or two down, the nutrients go to waste. No critters farther down.

There’s a shallow burial cemetery somewhere in Ireland for people who want their corpse to nourish the earth.
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05-12-2018, 22:12   #60
Obvious Desperate Breakfasts
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My childhood parish, which was very rural, had a few gravediggers by profession. I can’t say for sure that they dug ALL the graves. Maybe the friends and family of some deceased dug the graves in some cases. But any of funeral I attended there, the professional gravediggers had dug the grave. (You’d see them standing by with their shovels) That some graves were and are dug by family, friends and neighbours is totally new information to me. And it’s not like old traditions have completely gone. Wakes are still quite common but I’ve never heard of any other than gravediggers doing the job.

For such a small country, Ireland is so diverse in its traditions!

Last edited by Obvious Desperate Breakfasts; 05-12-2018 at 22:19.
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