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28-11-2018, 00:23   #46
mammajamma
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Christ.


She's young. She can share. Get a room in a house for 280e a month.


That leaves her with over 1300e a month with shared bills.


God forbid we're ever in a_real_ crisis.
280 a month! I know people paying 850 a month for a bog standard room in a bog standard house in rathmines. Maybe she can walk from kildare every day as a commute. Or does car ownership come with an equal reduction in your world?

Yeah, she should share a bed with someone for the next decade and be happy about it. That's life now.
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28-11-2018, 01:06   #47
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280 a month! I know people paying 850 a month for a bog standard room in a bog standard house in rathmines. Maybe she can walk from kildare every day as a commute. Or does car ownership come with an equal reduction in your world?

Yeah, she should share a bed with someone for the next decade and be happy about it. That's life now.
Yep, classic vested interests gobsh*teology: "there's someone always worse off than you, be happy with what you've got".

This sketch has always had a whiff of truth about it........

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28-11-2018, 01:25   #48
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I am paying 950 a month excluding bills for half an apartment.
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28-11-2018, 01:35   #49
The_Dazzler
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This a windup?


One of the highest paid public sector work forces in the oecd and they should be given rent allowance?




They should be just delighted we haven't started reverse bench marking.
I guarantee in my job as a hospital pharmacist, I make a lot more difference financially to the HSE than I am paid. The difference I make to patients lives is generally immeasurable. Ive worked my arse off to get to where I am today so apologies if you feel I'm too highly paid.
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28-11-2018, 01:44   #50
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I guarantee in my job as a hospital pharmacist, I make a lot more difference financially to the HSE than I am paid. The difference I make to patients lives is generally immeasurable. Ive worked my arse off to get to where I am today so apologies if you feel I'm too highly paid.
I wouldn't apologize at all if I were you. The 'anger' generated by begrudgery, resentment and downright jealousy at another's perceived better circumstances than their own is a widespread trait in this country.
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28-11-2018, 06:54   #51
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Christ.


She's young. She can share. Get a room in a house for 280e a month.


That leaves her with over 1300e a month with shared bills.


God forbid we're ever in a_real_ crisis.
Where, Donegal? Be one hell of a commute.
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28-11-2018, 07:13   #52
Fann Linn
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If I remember correctly, I read somewhere that paying special allowances to public-sector workers in cities is what happens in Britain.


The INMO had an unsuccessful strike in 2007 in which one of its demands was a special allowance for nurses in Dublin.
Not only public sector in Britain. When I lived in Liverpool we got higher wages than our colleagues in Scotland but less than our colleagues in the south of England primarily to reflect the cost of housing even though we all did comparable same jobs.
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28-11-2018, 07:23   #53
Calina
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Christ.


She's young. She can share. Get a room in a house for 280e a month.


That leaves her with over 1300e a month with shared bills.


God forbid we're ever in a_real_ crisis.
not everyone coming into the CS is 'young' and not everyone older comes in at principal officer level.

And I paid 320 pounds for a room in Dublin in 2000.

I dount if you will find a room for 280E in Dublin now. I emigrated 2 years ago because salary versus rent was an extremely fast route to bankruptcy.
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28-11-2018, 07:28   #54
Vox Nihili
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"It is one of the great failures of Government policy that people like teachers, gardaí, nurses, doctors, firemen and on and on cannot afford to buy a house or apartment and live in Ireland, most especially in Dublin."

It might be true that some teachers and nurses can't buy a house in Dublin right now -- but exactly the same thing holds true for most private-sector workers.

But it's utter nonsense to suggest that "teachers, gardai, nurses, doctors ... cannot afford ... to live in Ireland."

Last time I checked, Ireland extended outside of Dublin, and includes many areas that don't have eye-watering rents and house prices. Recent figures published by the Irish Times show that you can rent a 5-bedroom house in Kerry for €869 a month and a 5-bedroom house in Mayo for €793 a month.

A newly hired primary teacher starts off on €36k a year, which is significantly higher than the average Irish starting graduate salary of €28k a year. If you have a teacher/guard couple in their early 30s settling down and getting married in rural Ireland, they could be on around €100k gross between them easily, and will have no trouble living comfortably.

In many cases, I suspect that "We can't afford to live" really means "We aren't being kept in the style to which we have become accustomed." It's a blatant grab for even higher public-sector wages.
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28-11-2018, 07:34   #55
Calina
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"It is one of the great failures of Government policy that people like teachers, gardaí, nurses, doctors, firemen and on and on cannot afford to buy a house or apartment and live in Ireland, most especially in Dublin."

It might be true that some teachers and nurses can't buy a house in Dublin right now -- but exactly the same thing holds true for most private-sector workers.

But it's utter nonsense to suggest that "teachers, gardai, nurses, doctors ... cannot afford ... to live in Ireland."

Last time I checked, Ireland extended outside of Dublin, and includes many areas that don't have eye-watering rents and house prices. Recent figures published by the Irish Times show that you can rent a 5-bedroom house in Kerry for €869 a month and a 5-bedroom house in Mayo for €793 a month.

A newly hired primary teacher starts off on €36k a year, which is significantly higher than the average Irish starting graduate salary of €28k a year. If you have a teacher/guard couple in their early 30s settling down and getting married in rural Ireland, they could be on around €100k gross between them easily, and will have no trouble living comfortably.

In many cases, I suspect that "We can't afford to live" really means "We aren't being kept in the style to which we have become accustomed." It's a blatant grab for even higher public-sector wages.
Please. There are clerical, executive and probably admin officers starting off on less and most of those jobs tend to be in Dublin And not every one marries a guard. Commuting to and from Dublin is awful.

Stop cherry picking. And stop the let them eat cake act.
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28-11-2018, 07:35   #56
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Those who can’t do, teach.

If we are to hike their wages/allowances then the cost of everything else will rise as well.

A bit of commuting won’t do them any harm either, if they’re that worried about rent prices. Sure most of them will be out of the schools before rush hour hits anyway.
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28-11-2018, 07:41   #57
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This measure will divert public funds to artificially push up rents and property prices yet is presented as being taken in the public interest. Why not just put the money into building more social and affordable houses in Dublin to bring down the accomodation costs for everyone working there?

I wonder how many rental properties this unidentified "Principal" writing the article owns?
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28-11-2018, 07:48   #58
Vox Nihili
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Please. There are clerical, executive and probably admin officers starting off on less and most of those jobs tend to be in Dublin And not every one marries a guard. Commuting to and from Dublin is awful.

Stop cherry picking. And stop the let them eat cake act.
The article specifically claims that teachers, guards, and doctors can no longer afford to live in Ireland. So nobody is "cherry picking." Those are the specific professions mentioned by the author of the article.

Is it true that teachers, guards, and doctors can't afford to live in the country? No. Teachers and guards have a very good standard of living in Ireland, especially outside of Dublin. Doctors are among the highest earners in rural counties.

If you want to make a point about low-paid clerical staff in Dublin, fine. But that's not what the article is talking about.
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28-11-2018, 07:52   #59
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Decentralise more departments.
Free up accommodation for those who remain in cities.
Give a boost to other locations.
Win, win?!
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28-11-2018, 07:54   #60
WinnyThePoo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mammajamma View Post
A friends younger sister started in the public service last year, she's getting a smidgeon over minimum wage yet living/renting in Dublin. Don't know how she does it.

I think a lot of people are getting confused with a 50 year public servant who has all the hefty increments and bonuses already built up, versus someone who's trying to get their life off the ground.

Yet another 2 tier system.

Christ.


She's young. She can share. Get a room in a house for 280e a month.


That leaves her with over 1300e a month with shared bills.


God forbid we're ever in a_real_ crisis.
Where can you get a room for 280 euro a month?.
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