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28-07-2015, 19:05   #196
The_Conductor
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I think finding a school will have to be your first priority. There aren't a lot of gaelscoils in Dublin and it'll be hard to get your child into one at short notice. You need to base your property search around a suitable school.
Getting into a Gaelscoil will be an issue. In Lucan/Leixlip/Maynooth for example- despite a significant number of bunscoils after opening in recent years- often there aren't even places for siblings. I put our two down for school places in west Dublin- the same day that we registered the births- when they were less than 2 weeks old.

School places at primary level in the Dublin area- are ridiculously difficult to get into.
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31-08-2015, 21:07   #197
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My advice is to treat a property viewing appointment like an interview. Dress smart/professional, be friendly and confident towards the real estate agent and make sure that you have the documents with you in case you decide to lodge an application (make sure you have these in a nice plastic sleeve or similar - not all crumpled up.) Don't wait around deciding, you need to be decisive and decide during the first viewing whether you want it, otherwise you will likely miss out.

Even if you do miss out on the first property, if you have made a good impression on the real estate agent then they may let you know about other good properties that are about to become available.
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22-09-2015, 11:46   #198
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How risky it is to give someone a deposit of >1000 euro without getting a receipt or signing a lease? He requested to give the money in personal and not wire transfer them.
The guy had his ad in Daft for 1.5 month, I viewed the house, he works in the next building (checked his profile on LinkedIn)

However, he asked the deposit on hand, he did not mention anything about signing a lease and his sms messages are disappearing from my mobile (there is an option for that in some phones, and he should set that intentionally) so there is no proof of communication except some emails.

Maybe I am a little suspicious here, but is a lot at stake here and I am giving >1000 to someone I do not know.
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22-09-2015, 14:26   #199
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How risky it is to give someone a deposit of >1000 euro without getting a receipt or signing a lease? He requested to give the money in personal and not wire transfer them.
The guy had his ad in Daft for 1.5 month, I viewed the house, he works in the next building (checked his profile on LinkedIn)

However, he asked the deposit on hand, he did not mention anything about signing a lease and his sms messages are disappearing from my mobile (there is an option for that in some phones, and he should set that intentionally) so there is no proof of communication except some emails.

Maybe I am a little suspicious here, but is a lot at stake here and I am giving >1000 to someone I do not know.
Do not hand over money without something confirming it. I've only ever handed over money in exchange for a signed lease that specifically lists the paid deposit amount (and once a €200 booking deposit which was confirmed by email).
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07-11-2015, 21:03   #200
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Dipping into the renting pool for the first time in a few years. Many friends tell me it is best to work with landlords then real estate agents... more of a generalisation fair to say? I'd imagine there's bad apples on both sides of it.
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08-11-2015, 11:58   #201
 
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Dipping into the renting pool for the first time in a few years. Many friends tell me it is best to work with landlords then real estate agents... more of a generalisation fair to say? I'd imagine there's bad apples on both sides of it.
If someone cares enough about the property to go to the hassle of renting it themselves I would see that as a good sign.
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08-11-2015, 12:01   #202
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Dipping into the renting pool for the first time in a few years. Many friends tell me it is best to work with landlords then real estate agents... more of a generalisation fair to say? I'd imagine there's bad apples on both sides of it.
You can generally judge for yourself how you think the situation will work out if you meet the landlord. In my experience, only once have I had a good outcome while going through an agent. An agent has no responsibility if anything goes wrong with the rental property or the agreement.
Saying that, it is hard to find a place that is not handled by an agent these days.

Also, I wouldn't really consider it a 'bad apple' situation. If a landlord has ground rules, stipulations etc, that is up to them, but at least you will know about it upfront.
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26-12-2015, 22:50   #203
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Hi there - am looking for some advice...
Renting a room in my own house for the first time via daft...have always rented previously to friends.
What are the sorts of things I should check out? Think. I have a good 'gut' instinct but want to avoid any pitfalls.
Thanks!
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26-12-2015, 22:56   #204
 
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Hi there - am looking for some advice...
Renting a room in my own house for the first time via daft...have always rented previously to friends.
What are the sorts of things I should check out? Think. I have a good 'gut' instinct but want to avoid any pitfalls.
Thanks!
One of my big things was working hours. If someone works opposite hours to you or shifts, it was an impact on bills as the house is occupied more. Also if they're in a relationship, or if there's a chance they'll be in one, establish ground rules on overnights from the start.
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26-12-2015, 23:54   #205
 
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Originally Posted by TheScriptFan View Post
Hi there - am looking for some advice...
Renting a room in my own house for the first time via daft...have always rented previously to friends.
What are the sorts of things I should check out? Think. I have a good 'gut' instinct but want to avoid any pitfalls.
Thanks!
I have lived with a few lads that had taken a few weeks to come out of their shells, wasn't nice at all. Tread carefully when going with the gut, if in any doubt dont let them into your home. Other than that its the same advice as previous poster, establish rules for guests early and what hours are worked. Nothing worse than having some house cat lying on the couch all weekend when all you want to do is watch some tv in peace.
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28-12-2015, 02:13   #206
TheScriptFan
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One of my big things was working hours. If someone works opposite hours to you or shifts, it was an impact on bills as the house is occupied more. Also if they're in a relationship, or if there's a chance they'll be in one, establish ground rules on overnights from the start.
Does saying 2 overnight stays from partners per week (one weeknight & one weekend) seem reasonable? Good to get these things settle first off, you are right!
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28-12-2015, 11:18   #207
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Does saying 2 overnight stays from partners per week (one weeknight & one weekend) seem reasonable? Good to get these things settle first off, you are right!
To be honest- putting in a clause like this in a licence agreement- makes you come across as a control freak- and in addition- for some people- it would be a target, rather than a limit.

Having something vague along these lines might work better-

"Guests must be cleared with (insert home owner's name) in advance- and at least 2 days in advance if they are planning on staying over. In addition- a licensee may not have guests stay over on more than 2 consecutive nights, and no more than 4 instances in any calendar month"...........

(Ok- its not vague- but it stops people taking the piss- and it minimises the risk of random strangers in various states of undress being encountered first thing in the morning........)

I'd also be certain to put detailed instructions on how the heating system for the property works- alongside the immersion heater- if you have one, for water- and plaster signs around the place telling people to turn things off after themselves. You'd be amazed how what you might consider to be bleeding obvious- just isn't obvious at all, to some folk..........

Separate food presses for the person sharing with you- and an agreement on a weekly pot for general household consumables (toilet paper, washing powder, washing up liquid (or tablets), cleaning stuff etc etc)

A rota for a good clean of the house at least once a month.

Monthly rent- to be paid directly into your account on a particular date (the first of the month/the first working day of the month etc etc) There is nothing worse that having to chase people for money. If they set up a standing order for the duration- it'll probably make life easier for both of you. In any event- its not a good idea to carry around a couple of hundred Euro in cash- and it'll save both time and effort for both of you if its automated (not to mention- you'll have a good paper trail for your tax return- and you do have to declare it- even if you have no tax due on it).

Etc etc.
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03-09-2017, 10:57   #208
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What should you have in your "Renters CV"

A while ago I posted about a "renters cv" and have been asked many times about what it should contain, so its probably easier to start a thread on it.

I am not a landlord anymore in the RTB sense of the word, so maybe those who are actually following that side of it more closely can add better content than I can, but i'll give it a whirl to start the ball rolling.


When you contact a landlord by email you should attach a "Renters CV" to it, so that he can include you in his shortlist for viewing.
If email isnt the first contact then tell him you have one and whats in it on the phone and bring it to viewing and hand him a copy to take home and shortlist you.

Here is what I would be looking for.
State who youll be living with and for all parties provide the following details.

Usual details like.
Name
Phone number
Where you live / are from

Then add in the detail that will separate you from the crowd like.
Last 3 landlords refs (minimum) and their numbers.
How long you were living at each property and reason for leaving.
Work refs.
Bank statements.
If you require HAP.

Mod edit: always be careful when sending private data. It is usually preferable to give this in person so you know it isn't a scam.

Then stick in a cover letter about yourself. Where you are from, where you work, how long youve worked there, why you are moving, how great you are and how you would look after the place, like you have never had to call your previous landlords about anything minor etc. Basically tell them all the good things about yourself.

The landlord will ask your referees about the following so if you fell out with any of them of did any of the following, now is the chance to provide a reason. If you dont, the landlord will just throw your application in the bin when he talks to the refs and asks them the question.

So a bit stating if you always paid rent on time, if you missed it, why you missed it. If you used or tried to use the last months rent as deposit, why did you do this. If you withheld rent, why?


Wrap it all up into a nice PDF or word doc and attach it to your email contacting the landlord. Have copies to hand landlords at viewings or to hand agents.

--------------------

So now hopefully you are in a position that your landlord will keep you in the shortlist and then call your refs. When you pass that you will be invited to the viewing. Or some people might want more at a viewing and only ring refs afterwards. Just depends what way they like to do it. But your CV has covered most of the questions they will be asking and make you look good, and make them remember you, so you make the shortlist. Then if they do decide to meet you, it means that they are cool with letting to you and you just have to turn up and not turn out to be a dick.

After that theyll call in order of preference to offer the property.

Its all about making yourself the preferred tenant. Im sure there is much more, but having all that info at hand when whittling down the sheer amount of contacts is very helpful to a landlord and they will appreciate you doing it far more than having to put effort into finding out all this info.

Others, who are more current, can add to this list, or perhaps suggest better ways of singling out your application than I have.

If its a renters market you wouldnt have to do all this, but the sheer numbers at viewings now or making first contact will be exhausting.

Last edited by Michael D Not Higgins; 04-09-2017 at 08:43.
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14-07-2018, 12:12   #209
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Just looking for a little advice. Recently moved into a new place where the previous tenant had lived for four years. On the surface the place looked great; spacious, relatively clean etc. After living here a few weeks some issues have cropped up, and I'm wondering how "far" I can go towards getting them sorted. All relate to appliances.

The washing machine initially wasn't working; blocked filter, fixed easily. Now it is evident that the pressure to the machine isn't strong enough, and there is deposits of dirt (looks like pieces of dirty rubber) present after I cleaned the machine. Every 20/30 mins an error message is displayed, and this interrupts a wash.

The fridge isn't cold enough (dial is near max coldness - deposits of ice building up at the back); milk goes sour in under three days, fruit starts to smell overnight. All of the shelves on the inside of the door are broken and can't hold any weight. The freezer seems fine.

The landlord was happy to send out a plumber to look at the washing machine, and he noticed the low water pressure issue. He seemed to think that the problem went deeper than the washing machine.

I haven't addressed the issues above with my landlord yet, but how far can I go? It appears that the fridge needs to be replaced, but I can't see him wanting to shell out for a new fridge. Is it a case that I just have to suck it up and deal with the faulty appliances?
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14-07-2018, 21:15   #210
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No, you are entitled to have a fridge that cools. You are entitled to have a washer that washes (and you should also have a means to dry clothes, either an outdoor drying area or a dryer).

These are actually pretty straightforward things for a landlord to sort out. Through the magic of Power City, a washer and a fridge-freezer can be replaced, including fitting and removal of the old units for under 800 euros. It is less than a month's rent for the landlord. Just sending the plumber out to look at the machine will have cost the landlord 80 euros, which may well turn out to have been a waste of money. It is just not worth wasting time fixing these things if they are more than a couple of years old.

It could well be that your water pressure is low and that is causing the problem. Does the error code that comes up indicate this sort of problem? It wouldn't cause the problem with the rubber that you are describing.

If there is ice in your fridge, it may be that the door isn't closing properly. It may or may not be possible to fix this, but it is worth a try.

It be that the the appliances are just worn out.
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