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27-05-2020, 19:07   #46
DoozerT6
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Extension cords and double adaptors! You may need these if there aren't enough power points (for your needs) in a room.

Toilet paper - on the day you move in!!

Iron and ironing board

Lightbulbs!

Hoover/sweeping brush/some type of mop/dustpan and brush.

Take people up on their offers to buy you a housewarming gift of some sort - you can get your crockery and cutlery sets that way, pots etc, small kitchen appliances, towels/bedding, that sort of thing. I would give them a general (not too expensive) price range though so as not to take advantage of their goodwill. No €600 coffee machines!! Keep an eye on sales to direct people towards those for gift purchases.

Quite honestly, you'll find out pretty quickly what you need or cannot do without.
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28-05-2020, 08:49   #47
Sour Lemonz
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bleach for toilets, couple pairs marigold rubber gloves, disposable cleaning cloths and sponges, toilet brush for each toilet u have, bath/shower cleaner.

Cloths/brush for washing dishes, hand soap, oven cleaner, surface antibac cleaning spray.

A personal recommendation would be sonic pest control devices, 2 should suffice in either end of house to keep unwanted guests (rats/mice) away from your home and general property area.

in terms of cooking utensils, you dont need a huge knife block set to do what you need in the kitchen, a good investment if you can afford is a good quality chef knife (you can do 90% of your cooking requirements with this), a small paring knife for veg/fruit, bread knife and a sharpening steel. A lot of folks invest in 10-32pc knife block sets and half, if not more goes unused, those 4 essentials, cared for correctly will last you a lifetime and do most what you need at home.

Stainless steel pots and pan will last you long time, if buying non stick pan, invest in one that is pfoa free (harmful chemical) such as tefal, but stainless better for heat distribution and long lasting if you take care of it, metal handle pan you can also use in oven.

If you going to look for something like a deep fryer, i would suggest looking into something like a multi cooker that can pressure cook, deep fry, rice cook and so on. Good investment in 1 tool that does a lot and you will use more regularly, rather than spending on a lot of equipment that may get used sparsely. (good space saver)

5l bottle of distilled vinegar, weird one to throw in but mixed with salt and water it kills weeds, mixed with water cleans tough stains, good on chips

Thats all i can think of now, but i would suggest putting all the items suggested by everyone into an excel document (put the brand you going for into 1 column, size/quantity in next and then cost in last column) do a sum formula to identify your costs, then decide which is most important to you immediately and you can knock stuff off the list as you go.

Last edited by Sour Lemonz; 28-05-2020 at 08:53.
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28-05-2020, 12:10   #48
Claw Hammer
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Don't forget garden tools like lawnmower, rake, spade etc. By far the best thing to do is go to household auctions and get everything on the cheap and then replace items when you are comfortable doing so.
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28-05-2020, 12:21   #49
SozBbz
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Don't forget garden tools like lawnmower, rake, spade etc. By far the best thing to do is go to household auctions and get everything on the cheap and then replace items when you are comfortable doing so.
OP is looking at a duplex so unlikely they'll need any garden implements.
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28-05-2020, 22:58   #50
antimatterx
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I recommend the podcase 'The Home Stretch' to people. It's a 6 part series on buying your first house in Ireland.
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29-05-2020, 00:34   #51
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Great thanks. Currently listening to the first episode on tune in
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29-05-2020, 01:37   #52
ontheditch2
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As others have said, if there is contents already in the house, ask what price for them all.
When we bought recently, was ex rental.
We asked for a price for all the contents and he asked for €700. We had a limit of €1,000 max in our heads and my own thinking was, it would be a cheap investment to start us off.
Nothing was new, the beds were all used etc but we got: washing machine, dishwasher, (at about €700 for this 2 new of buying new) fridge freezer, table & chairs, chest of drawers, sofa & 2 arm chairs, TV stand, curtains and blinds in all rooms, 2 double beds and 1 single with mattresses.
We tried to move on some of the beds and furniture after a few weeks/months as we gradually upgraded stuff but couldn't give them away on donedeal, had to go to the dump with some stuff.
There is lots of free stuff available.

My advice would be made the bedroom comfortable, make the living room and kitchen comfortable. Add to the rest in your own time. Money is tight when you buy a house so anything you can put on the long finger, do, if needed
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29-05-2020, 11:07   #53
antimatterx
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Great thanks. Currently listening to the first episode on tune in
I got the recommendations on reddit a few backs and it was a pretty information listen.
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01-06-2020, 22:55   #54
lulu1
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I would really try and buy new from the start I know you get some good bargains second hand but for piece of mind I would try an buy new for electricial items anyway.

We bought a leather suite second hand and to be honest it looked like new The lady told us they paid over 4000euro for it and I believe her

Turns out the lady always sat on one seat of the sofa when watching tv and now when you sit on it you sink right down no one in the house will sit on it
but in saying that it definately looks the part

Good luck in your new home op
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02-06-2020, 14:58   #55
DoozerT6
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Originally Posted by lulu1 View Post
I would really try and buy new from the start I know you get some good bargains second hand but for piece of mind I would try an buy new for electricial items anyway.

We bought a leather suite second hand and to be honest it looked like new The lady told us they paid over 4000euro for it and I believe her

Turns out the lady always sat on one seat of the sofa when watching tv and now when you sit on it you sink right down no one in the house will sit on it)
but in saying that it definately looks the part

Good luck in your new home op
You can buy a 'sofa saver', basically a foldable square made from wood and/or plastic that you put under the cushion, on the frame of the sofa, and it supports the seat. Might help with the sinkage - I actually need one myself.
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02-06-2020, 21:24   #56
Gael23
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bleach for toilets, couple pairs marigold rubber gloves, disposable cleaning cloths and sponges, toilet brush for each toilet u have, bath/shower cleaner.

Cloths/brush for washing dishes, hand soap, oven cleaner, surface antibac cleaning spray.5l bottle of distilled vinegar, weird one to throw in but mixed with salt and water it kills weeds, mixed with water cleans tough stains, good on chips

.
That sort of stuff adds up when you move in first but then you replenish as they run out gradually. If it was me I’d add a bottle of cream cleaner to that lost for tough stains and bathrooms. You could spend €50 on once off cleaning and laundry materials to start
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02-06-2020, 21:55   #57
Maz2016
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That sort of stuff adds up when you move in first but then you replenish as they run out gradually. If it was me I’d add a bottle of cream cleaner to that lost for tough stains and bathrooms. You could spend €50 on once off cleaning and laundry materials to start
That’s true, cleaning products can be expensive. But as someone rightly pointed out, Dealz is great for these things
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11-06-2020, 21:21   #58
brisan
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Spend more than €500 on your bed and mattress, a good bed and especially a good mattress are worth there weight in gold long term.
A wise man once said
Always spend big on shoes and beds
You will spend 16 hours a day in one and 8 hours in the other
Spend big on the mattress is my advice
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11-06-2020, 21:43   #59
Maz2016
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A wise man once said
Always spend big on shoes and beds
You will spend 16 hours a day in one and 8 hours in the other
Spend big on the mattress is my advice
That’s god advice. I will definitely do that. I already only buy good quality shoes so that makes sense
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11-06-2020, 22:22   #60
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Avoid debt and credit cards while furnishing house. If you need flooring it's the actual extras that catch you. The adhesive, grout and Reims for tiling, the damp seal, underlay, trims and beading. These cost the same whether you but good quality or poorer quality products. If buying wooden floor look for AC 4 or 5 as these are harder wearing and will not mark easily.

A lot of charity shops now have a furniture section some of the furniture can be of an excellent quality. You could pick up sitting room suits, tables, chairs, etc for a few hundred euro. Check second had furniture shops for ex hotel beds the quality will be excellent you will often find odds and ends in both these places as well.

IKEA for all the smaller bits and pieces, from utensils, glasses, tableware, pots and pans to bath mats, curtains, toilet roll holders. But check around other stores as well.

If you are capable a but of DIY such as hanging curtain rails and toilet roll holders you may need some tools. Lidl do a excellent brand in Parkside a batter drill is a must for anything from hanging curtains rails to putting flat packs togeather.

Electric goods some things are a priority, you will need a washing machine, and hob, you will get away without an oven for a while if need be, a microwave, you could do without a dishwasher for a few years if need be. You may come across some bits and pieces on DD. If you decide to buy all your electric goods together got to a few electric shops and most will give you a discount for buying 4-5 items together it might only be 30-50 euro but money is money
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