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23-09-2018, 21:47   #31
catrat12
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I know this sounds stupid and to be honest it was probably a Fox
But I thought I saw a wolf in glencullen chasing sheep one evening few weeks back from my window
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23-09-2018, 21:48   #32
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It was more grey than red and much bigger than fox
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23-09-2018, 21:58   #33
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I know this sounds stupid and to be honest it was probably a Fox
But I thought I saw a wolf in glencullen chasing sheep one evening few weeks back from my window
Huskies have a strong chase instinct and they became incredibly popular in a very very short amount of time in Ireland because of nothing to do with their traits and everything to do with their looks.

There's a lot of unwanted ones in various rescue centres around the country which usually means there's lots of uncared for huskies not being looked after properly. They're a high maintenance, high energy dog that need plenty of play time, exercise, stimulation and attention. A lot of people that dropped a cool 1k on their Malamute or Siberian husky were very unprepared and unable to keep up with the demands of such a dog.

It's not unknown for people to dump dogs in rural areas thinking they'd "fend for themselves".

Foxes don't really chase sheep. Not in the manner dogs do. They'll hang around for dead lambs or the afterbirth. I've seen foxes casually walk through fields of sheep without a bat of an eyelid from the flocks.
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24-09-2018, 00:41   #34
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8 times zones west wolf news...

The gray wolf (Canis lupus) is a native species that was likely extirpated from California in the 1920s. The gray wolf is now returning to California on its own by dispersal of individuals from populations in other states. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is working to monitor this recovering endangered species.
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24-09-2018, 00:48   #35
 
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I like the idea, but in practice the habitat for them simply does not exist.

Tragically we're one of the most deforested countries in Europe and most of us don't seem to give a ****.
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24-09-2018, 01:49   #36
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Plenty of space in dail eireann.

The Irish Wolfhound is another thing thats not really "Irish" you could say the Harp also?

No wounder our ancestors had such respect for the Wolf. Like the native Irish it too was hunted into smaller regions of the country by eh... "outsiders"

In truth the Wolf is a shy mystic creature... Nothing at all the the old tales. Still to be respected.
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24-09-2018, 02:05   #37
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Complete fairy tale stuff lads this talk of wolves in Ireland. The country is basically one giant farm with absolutely no wilderness. Sheep are everywhere, up in the mointains and no way of preventing re-introduced wolves in taking easy prey. They'd be hunted to extinction again in no time. We'd need a national park 3 or 4 times the size of the Wicklow mointains with no farmers livestock, just impossible in this country.
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26-09-2018, 04:53   #38
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They'd be hunted to extinction again in no time.
That summarizes it.
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26-09-2018, 11:17   #39
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What about the Blaskets? Or are they used for sheep? You'd think we'd have one unpopulated Island that we could put a few wolves on. Look at the wallabies on Lambay, they are thriving. Though they are herbivores I guess.
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26-09-2018, 12:10   #40
 
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What about the Blaskets? Or are they used for sheep? You'd think we'd have one unpopulated Island that we could put a few wolves on. Look at the wallabies on Lambay, they are thriving. Though they are herbivores I guess.
Well, you'd need some sheep or such to be on the island But, probably way to small an area for a wolf.
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26-09-2018, 12:18   #41
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What about the Blaskets? Or are they used for sheep? You'd think we'd have one unpopulated Island that we could put a few wolves on. Look at the wallabies on Lambay, they are thriving. Though they are herbivores I guess.
Yep, there is still a population of sheep on the Blasket Islands. Those numbers would soon dwindle if predators were introduced.

Not sure if there are other animals inhabiting them, but there would be smaller mammals like rabbits and mice etc.

Space wise, I doubt it would be a runner. Ireland 200 years ago would be perfect, now, not so much.
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26-09-2018, 12:22   #42
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In some US states you can. Wild animal restrictions apply. Friend had one. Had to be "introduced" to wolf by owner. After that, no problems.
Was it a handshake or a quick howerya and and a nod, or what? Tell us more.
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26-09-2018, 12:44   #43
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Complete fairy tale stuff lads this talk of wolves in Ireland. The country is basically one giant farm with absolutely no wilderness. Sheep are everywhere, up in the mointains and no way of preventing re-introduced wolves in taking easy prey. They'd be hunted to extinction again in no time. We'd need a national park 3 or 4 times the size of the Wicklow mointains with no farmers livestock, just impossible in this country.
French wolf packs reportedly need around 220km2 per pack. Wicklow park has that, we could extend Donegal from 170 to 220, and Killarney to 220. Reduce the livestock units per hectare down to minimum for BPS etc. with a very little extra 'wolf payment ' 'coz livestock farming is only breaking even a.t.m. We could tie this scheme into the eagle projects!
So we could have 3 packs, and every so often we could mix them up a bit for genetic diversity. They could eat the deer and bits and bobs. Locals could run airbnbs for the wolf/ deer /eagle tourists. Twould be a boon to the tourist industry'coz God knows we don't get enough tourists.
In other news......
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27-09-2018, 02:12   #44
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Was it a handshake or a quick howerya and and a nod, or what? Tell us more.
They have a sign. Backyard door in 8 ft fence. "Trespassers will be eaten." I wouldn't challenge that.

Wolf owner took me by hand. Walked me slowly over to couch. We sat. He continuously talked to wolf. Reassured I was friend. Hugged me. Called him to come over. He approached. Ears perked. I did not give him eye contact. I held out my hand with owners together. Sniffed me. Then closed against me and I could pet him. After that I could go to my friend's house and enter. No problems. I guess I was a part of the pack. Not sure if this wolf ritual was common. Worked for this wolf.
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27-09-2018, 18:31   #45
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They have a sign. Backyard door in 8 ft fence. "Trespassers will be eaten." I wouldn't challenge that.

Wolf owner took me by hand. Walked me slowly over to couch. We sat. He continuously talked to wolf. Reassured I was friend. Hugged me. Called him to come over. He approached. Ears perked. I did not give him eye contact. I held out my hand with owners together. Sniffed me. Then closed against me and I could pet him. After that I could go to my friend's house and enter. No problems. I guess I was a part of the pack. Not sure if this wolf ritual was common. Worked for this wolf.
I'm kinda fascinated by this. What does your friend feed him? Does he need acres of roaming space etc?
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