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01-06-2017, 23:56   #1
Crann na Beatha
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Jihad,social media and what drives young men to radicalism.psychological studies?

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02-06-2017, 12:02   #2
The Black Oil
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https://digest.bps.org.uk/2014/10/27...mism-digested/
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08-06-2017, 16:15   #3
JuliusCaesar
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Why do young men become extremists?
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08-06-2017, 20:51   #4
The Black Oil
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Long read from the Guardian from April this year.

https://www.theguardian.com/news/201...he-new-jihadis
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23-06-2017, 11:49   #5
The Black Oil
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BPS Digest again. https://digest.bps.org.uk/2017/06/06...nce-stood-out/
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28-06-2017, 05:20   #6
Crann na Beatha
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28-06-2017, 06:10   #7
gvidpw
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I don't think we can exclude the content of the Qur'an as an influencing factor. We have adherents of Islam responsible for 90%+ of the incidents despite being a low proportion of the population, cooberated across many countries with different policies including Muslim majority countries. It would be a massive statistical anomaly for that degree of correlation with those who have read the Qur'an for it to have zero factor.

Also the isolation theory doesn't make sense because we have plenty that are isolated in other cultures who are far less likely to commit mass attacks because then you would consider the increased calling for isolation of those based on race or sex such as white males would create an expected threat of attack from the current mistreatment and mass targeting. Either the isolation theory is accurate and current social trends are very dangerous or it is inaccurate.

I'm going with inaccurate because there are also issues with isolation without mass attack in Hispanic populations and minor Asian ethnicities like Vietnamese. Vietnamese have relatively few homocultural peers in for example the US. Basically isolation theory from a statistical standpoint is bunk and content of Qur'an is statistically undismissable and independently cooberated.

Luckily living in a global world it is often easy to see cause and affect because we have multiple countries to look at and we can see what has a consistent high degree of increased correlation, and what has an inconsistent degree of increased correlation. Those with a highly inconsistent increase in correlation when controlled for factors will usually when properly studied have lower impact than their average raw correlation.
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10-07-2017, 10:39   #8
TomSweeney
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This handy guide is helpful.
https://twitter.com/GodfreyElfwick/s...44688252059649
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10-07-2017, 10:46   #9
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I'd have to agree with Joe stiglitz in that poverty and growing inequality contributes to the creation of terror
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11-10-2017, 23:17   #10
The Black Oil
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BBC Radio 4

Extremism: Hidden in Plain Sight

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b096hczb

Posting as reminder to self to listen.
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21-03-2019, 20:29   #11
The Black Oil
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In case you're wondering about the effects of watching beheading videos, in the first stuff of this kind. Never watched one myself.

Quote:
In the summer of 2014, two videos were released that shocked the world. They showed the beheadings, by ISIS, of two American journalists – first, James Foley and then Steven Sotloff. Though the videos were widely discussed on TV, print and online news, most outlets did not show the full footage. However, it was not difficult to find links to the videos online. At the time, Sarah Redmond at the University of California, Irvine and her colleagues were already a year into a longitudinal study to assess psychological responses to the Boston Marathon Bombing, which happened in April 2013. They realised that they could use the same nationally representative sample of US adults to investigate what kind of person chooses to watch an ISIS beheading – and why. Their findings now appear in a paper published in American Psychologist.

By late spring 2013, the researchers had recruited 4,675 adults online, and assessed their mental health, TV-watching habits, demographics, political affiliation and religion. Six months later, the participants also reported on their fear of future terrorism and also on their lifetime exposure to violence. Then, between April and June 2015 – roughly eight months after the two ISIS beheading videos were released – 3,294 of the participants reported anonymously whether they had watched one of the videos either in its entirety, partly, or not at all.

About 20 per cent reported watching part of one of the videos, and another 5 per cent said they’d watched at least one to the end. People in these groups were more likely to be male, Christian and unemployed, to watch more TV than average, and to have a higher lifetime experience of violence.

Nearly 3000 of the participants also agreed to write about their motivations for watching, stopping watching, or avoiding the videos altogether.

Many who fully or partially watched the videos said that they wanted to gain information and verify that the videos existed, or wanted to satisfy their curiosity about what was in them. People who stopped watching part way through or who avoided the videos reported that they did so mostly for emotional reasons – (it was “too sad”, for example) – or because they didn’t want to feel that they were supporting ISIS by watching the footage.

A year after the participants gave these responses, they completed more online surveys, and the researchers found that those who’d watched at least part of a video had higher levels of distress and a greater fear of future negative events compared with those that hadn’t watched one. These relationships held after controlling for prior distress, lifetime exposure to violence and prior fear of negative events.
https://digest.bps.org.uk/2019/03/08...t-had-on-them/

Last edited by The Black Oil; 21-03-2019 at 23:07.
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21-03-2019, 22:32   #12
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Identity_fusion

As we were taught it, fusion of identity meant that someone couldn't differentiate emotionally between their own sister being bombed and someone they'd never met, thousands of miles away. So as a result they reacted with the same rage and pain and despair, and a small portion of people with fused identities became terrorists as a result, just as you'd expect some would if it was literally their own family being bombed, losing the ability to think rationally under extreme emotional distress

It was just one theory I learned about, I've no idea how real it is or how often it's the cause if it is ever the cause
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23-04-2019, 15:52   #13
micky jammy delahunty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperRabbit View Post

As we were taught it, fusion of identity meant that someone couldn't differentiate emotionally between their own sister being bombed and someone they'd never met, thousands of miles away. So as a result they reacted with the same rage and pain and despair, and a small portion of people with fused identities became terrorists as a result, just as you'd expect some would if it was literally their own family being bombed, losing the ability to think rationally under extreme emotional distress
Yes, but the converse is also true. The callous indifference towards people one does not identify with.

Take for example Israel. When Benjamin Netanyahu is addressing an American audience, he very carefully projects an image through his presentation and accent of being a mid-western bank manager. He's careful in these presentations to never evoke anti-semitism; the message is, I'm just like you, the Palestinians are the other, who feel no pain and are mindlessly bent on destruction. And this plays on the middle-class extremism in western society. When the Israelis launch one of their periodic massacres, western middle-classes do not feel horror, they feel positive and secure, that negroids are being kept at bay.

Missing White Woman syndrome is another example. Basically, you can rape and murder as many drug addicted prostitutes as you like, lay a finger on a white upper-middle-class woman, and the media explodes.
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11-02-2020, 18:56   #14
SuperRabbit
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Sorry for bumping an old thread, but I've been reading this book and I think it might have the answer to how on earth anyone would join one of these awful groups. We've been sold this narrative that people "join" cults because of some personal vulnerability, but it seems people are recruited, and if you've never been in a cult it's purely because the wrong person hasn't gotten to you on the wrong day (or from the cult's perspective, the right person on the right day).



It's a very interesting book, see if you can get your local library to order it!

The writer has loads of free information on his website and its blog: https://freedomofmind.com/
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12-02-2020, 12:55   #15
micky jammy delahunty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperRabbit View Post
if you've never been in a cult it's purely because the wrong person hasn't gotten to you on the wrong day (or from the cult's perspective, the right person on the right day).
Describe a "wrong day".

I have a theory susceptibility may be related to a person's experience of authority in childhood.

Also my experiences would lead me to believe, there are many people who are cult leaders, but who lack the charisma to get anyone to follow them.
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