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08-06-2017, 16:13   #16
JuliusCaesar
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I expect that they are so little qualified that they don't know the difference between psychiatrists, psychologists, and psychotherapists.
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08-06-2017, 19:30   #17
dar100
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I expect that they are so little qualified that they don't know the difference between psychiatrists, psychologists, and psychotherapists.

Medicate, measure, heal
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08-06-2017, 20:00   #18
Professor Moriarty
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I expect that they are so little qualified that they don't know the difference between psychiatrists, psychologists, and psychotherapists.
More missionary zeal than psychologial support.
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14-06-2017, 18:56   #19
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Thought I would post this here seems as we already touched on this area instead of starting a new thread!!

Not my words, (taken from wellbeing foundation) it's about that young girl held under the mental health act that was seeking to have an abortion

There are pointers which indicate that the 'psychiatrist' who first saw this young woman is a protegée of Professor Dr Patricia Casey, professor of psychiatry at UCD, chief shrink at the Mater Hospital, SPUC supporter, and patron/supporter of the extreme right-wing Catholiban entity, the Iona Institute.

It is absolutely appalling that an extremist like Casey or any of her supporters could be able to MISUSE the Mental Health Act to further their own religion-driven agenda in relation to women's rights and deny any woman her *entitlement* under Irish law to a termination if she is danger of suicide.

Petition here if anyone is interested
https://my.uplift.ie/petitions/locking-women-up-because-they-want-an-abortion-is-barbaric?source=facebook-share-button&time=1497430232

Last edited by dar100; 16-06-2017 at 10:20.
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17-06-2017, 19:39   #20
Valmont
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It is absolutely appalling that an extremist like Casey or any of her supporters could be able to MISUSE the Mental Health Act to further their own religion-driven agenda in relation to women's rights and deny any woman her *entitlement* under Irish law to a termination if she is danger of suicide.
Dare I say if you think this you misunderstand the social function of civil commitment. People are sent to psychiatric hospitals against their will when they violate social mores (walk around your town in the nip for a while if you don't believe me). In this case this unfortunate young woman ran afoul of our society's antipathy towards abortion. This is a perfect example of the mental health act doing exactly what it was designed to do.
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17-06-2017, 19:43   #21
Valmont
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What's the point in regulating these professions? Let's say there is a dodgy counsellor who can no longer practice as a result of this legislation, he's just going to call himself a life coach or personal motivation assistant instead.
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17-06-2017, 19:58   #22
dar100
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Dare I say if you think this you misunderstand the social function of civil commitment. People are sent to psychiatric hospitals against their will when they violate social mores (walk around your town in the nip for a while if you don't believe me). In this case this unfortunate young woman ran afoul of our society's antipathy towards abortion. This is a perfect example of the mental health act doing exactly what it was designed to do.
Hardly the same "breaking of social norms"
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27-02-2018, 10:49   #23
Hoochiemama
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Regulation

Hi

Im just curious about what peoples opinions are on upcoming regulation in counselling and psychotherapy and what they think the criteria will be? Im in my 4th year of an IAHIP recognised course and am wondering am I going to have to go and do a 2 years masters now? Which makes me want to weep a little bit as I dont have the funds and had planned for just doing these 4 years.
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03-03-2018, 07:00   #24
Black Swan
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See Ronny Swain, Regulation of the psychology profession in Ireland: context, history and personal reflections, The Irish Journal of Psychology, Volume 35, April 2014, Issue 1, pp. 7-15.
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03-03-2018, 14:00   #25
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Wait, is this actually going to happen then? I thought they'd been talking about it for years and it wasn't clear if it would? Is your BA not enough to allow you to practice as a counsellor? I thought BAs would be counsellors and MAs would be psychotherapists?

I don't understand why they'd exclude BAs, when study after study has shown that even placebo therapy (where you are just listened to attentively and no methodology is employed) is massively helpful, and usually as effective as real therapy, and when we are dealing with a situation where thousands of people who need therapy can't afford it.

I read a PCI blog post outlying what the new BAs / Bsc's would need to look like but now I can't find it
I assume that, being businesses, the private colleges will make add-on courses to make the old BAs equal to the new BAs, surely? And these should work out cheaper than getting an MA, which is something we'd rather get after working in counselling for a few years and saving up, and not before.

Anyway, where there is a will there is a way. In the past I let people convince me that things were impossible, and then afterwards I saw people in the same situation as me had persisted and had gotten what I wanted and had given up on! No one can take those 4 years away from you or pretend like they weren't worthwhile, there will be some door that will get you the title. Maybe they'll invent a new term for people stuck in limbo in the meantime. "Distress Consultant" or something!

Last edited by SuperRabbit; 03-03-2018 at 14:27.
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20-03-2018, 14:40   #26
The Black Oil
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Mod - I've merged a few threads on this subject for background info and I imagine it'll be an ongoing discussion once developments start to emerge.
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29-03-2018, 17:56   #27
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It used to be you only needed a diploma for accreditation, apparently, for accreditation the bodies now want a Level 8 degree for that, so private universities are offering upgrade programmes for professional counsellors who previously only had diplomas. I'm sure if it's necessary they'll do the exact same for those of us with Level 8s in the future, should that no longer be enough.
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05-04-2018, 12:17   #28
Jimmy Bottlehead
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Personally, I'm in favour of higher standards of regulation. It's not that I equate higher levels of education with higher levels of efficacy, but at least there is a greater theoretical basis there along with the dedication of time and resources over several years to the profession. It stops it being a case of one year diploma and you're accredited.
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05-04-2018, 19:57   #29
SuperRabbit
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I'll be in favour of asking more college of counsellors when someone shows me evidence that more years of college translate into better results for clients (not a rhetorical question).
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05-04-2018, 20:52   #30
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I'll be in favour of asking more college of counsellors when someone shows me evidence that more years of college translate into better results for clients (not a rhetorical question).
It can but of course as with everything in the therapy field it's not black and white. Depending on the course provider having a comprehensive training to Masters level can greatly help working as a psychotherapist or counsellor. There is value to be had in the theoretical approaches. For example a good knowledge of object relations theory can help inform the work.
Then there is the personal work such a process groups and own therapy which takes time to settle in to. Personally I wouldn't attend a psychotherapist who wasn't very well qualified.
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