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16-01-2020, 21:37   #1
sparklinglens
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Cuan Mhuire question

I'm unsure of how to ask this question without coming across as judgemental.

I have been looking into Cuan Mhuire rehab for my drinking problem, but I read that 40% of their patients on admission are homeless. I also read an article about a man who murdered a women he met while in rehab there. (Both of whom were homeless).

I have absolutely nothing against homeless people, but I wondered about people's experiences in Cuan Mhuire, and the type of people they met there? I guess I know that homeless people can be rough, (not always of course), and I'd be nervous going into rehab in a scenario like this.

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16-01-2020, 22:54   #2
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Check out this AMA - might be helpful.
I read the whole thing and then looked up the Irish Times article about the lady who had been in rehab.
https://www.boards.ie/...ead.php?t=2058018574
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17-01-2020, 00:01   #3
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Originally Posted by sparklinglens View Post
I'm unsure of how to ask this question without coming across as judgemental.

I have been looking into Cuan Mhuire rehab for my drinking problem, but I read that 40% of their patients on admission are homeless. I also read an article about a man who murdered a women he met while in rehab there. (Both of whom were homeless).

I have absolutely nothing against homeless people, but I wondered about people's experiences in Cuan Mhuire, and the type of people they met there? I guess I know that homeless people can be rough, (not always of course), and I'd be nervous going into rehab in a scenario like this.
Good on you for considering going that’s a big leap and a positive one. Which Cuan Mhuire? I can only talk about the one in Athy as that’s the one I’ve visited numerous times (visiting a family member). I found everyone really nice. The family member had-no trouble there and got on with everyone. There’s bound to be some people you won’t take to or like to be around but that’s normal in any group situation. If you chat to the staff about your concerns before you sign up for it they should put you at ease. You’d be surprised how there are all walks of life in there plus you are kept very busy with meetings and work and you are so focused on getting well that you’ll find you just slot in. It’s always worth giving a try if you are ready and willing. You’re only allowed a certain amount of cash and meals are provided but if you are going to the Athy one the food in the canteen is sooooo good! I actually miss visiting there. My loved one is sober just over two years thanks to his change in mindset and Cuan Mhuire. It’s changed his life after 30 years of drinking. If you go with the flow and just get stuck in once the settling in time is done you’ll enjoy the routine. Take any support you can, best of luck with whatever you choose.
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17-01-2020, 23:49   #4
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Check out this AMA - might be helpful.
I read the whole thing and then looked up the Irish Times article about the lady who had been in rehab.
https://www.boards.ie/...ead.php?t=2058018574
Thanks for the link but it says page not found!
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17-01-2020, 23:53   #5
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Good on you for considering going that’s a big leap and a positive one. Which Cuan Mhuire? I can only talk about the one in Athy as that’s the one I’ve visited numerous times (visiting a family member). I found everyone really nice. The family member had-no trouble there and got on with everyone. There’s bound to be some people you won’t take to or like to be around but that’s normal in any group situation. If you chat to the staff about your concerns before you sign up for it they should put you at ease. You’d be surprised how there are all walks of life in there plus you are kept very busy with meetings and work and you are so focused on getting well that you’ll find you just slot in. It’s always worth giving a try if you are ready and willing. You’re only allowed a certain amount of cash and meals are provided but if you are going to the Athy one the food in the canteen is sooooo good! I actually miss visiting there. My loved one is sober just over two years thanks to his change in mindset and Cuan Mhuire. It’s changed his life after 30 years of drinking. If you go with the flow and just get stuck in once the settling in time is done you’ll enjoy the routine. Take any support you can, best of luck with whatever you choose.
Thanks a million. It really helps to hear other people’s perspectives. Can I ask was that your family member’s first rehab stint?

It’s a huge step if I do it and I guess I’m scared. I’ll have to take time off work and tell my manager why and I’m obviously frightened of the stigma, and whether it will make her believe I’m not fit for work. And I don’t know what I’d do about my apartment. (I’m in private rented, sharing at the moment).

There’s a lot to consider but when I hear positive stories like this it really helps.
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18-01-2020, 00:00   #6
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Thanks for the link but it says page not found!
Sorry this is it. https://touch.boards.ie/thread/2058018574
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19-01-2020, 23:41   #7
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Hi there OP. I was in Cuan Mhuire four and a half years ago as one of four stints in different rehabs for alcohol dependency.

My impression? Much tougher than the other rehabs I was in but far far cheaper. If you have private health insurance you can get into St Pats, Rutland, St John of Gods etc but you only need your social welfare for Cuan Mhuire. It is a 12 week programme so a long stint but it really helps many who go there.

I was in Athy in summer 2015. They put you into a detox unit for the first week where you stay in your PJs and are medicated and under observation. It is a long stint and very, very religious with obligatory prayers, mass and rosary every single day, which I found very off putting. There are also many in there who are from very tough and deprived, criminal backgrounds so you need to keep your head down and not get into a row with anyone. Don't let that put you off -
nearly everyone gets on grand and social time is usually during the smoke breaks and at lunch and later in the evenings.

You will be up at 6.30am every morning, and you will be assigned a job to do during the day. There will be group therapy sessions (really more a series of lessons/programmes) and AA meetings. No mobile phones or anything electronic allowed. There is also a gym which is popular with the younger men. You can make phone calls to your family/friends most evenings when you can get a slot to use the much in demand pay phone.

Visitors are permitted on Saturday and Sunday afternoons for a few hours and you can meet and chat in the cafe and garden centre on site. The grounds of Cuan Mhuire Athy are really beautiful and well kept - they were lovely for walking around in. Leaving the complex, unless for a medical emergency or very important personal business, is not permitted. Occasionally a minibus is available to run people down into Athy town to do light grocery shopping and post office/bank during the week, but you need to book a place for this service.

Cuan Mhuire really does help a lot of people who go there and if you do go, make sure to get the most out of it. Personally, I felt that my final stint in rehab, in the Rutland Centre and then regular AA meetings (nearly every day for the first four months) and sticking with a home AA group, getting a sponsor and working the steps was what helped me finally turn the corner (with great support from my OH).

I wish you well in your recovery journey!

Last edited by JupiterKid; 20-01-2020 at 12:51.
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20-01-2020, 14:28   #8
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whiteoaks in donegal very good also, similar routine but smaller and quieter.
definitely worth looking into, good luck.
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20-01-2020, 14:33   #9
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Originally Posted by sparklinglens View Post
Thanks a million. It really helps to hear other people’s perspectives. Can I ask was that your family member’s first rehab stint?

It’s a huge step if I do it and I guess I’m scared. I’ll have to take time off work and tell my manager why and I’m obviously frightened of the stigma, and whether it will make her believe I’m not fit for work. And I don’t know what I’d do about my apartment. (I’m in private rented, sharing at the moment).

There’s a lot to consider but when I hear positive stories like this it really helps.
As regards the apartment it should not be that difficult to arrange a short term let, assuming it's a month or more. A conversation with flatmates is a must here. Best of luck in your challenge
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20-01-2020, 14:42   #10
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My own experience in Cuan Mhuire and in other rehabs with high levels of homelessness is that you shouldn't bring any money or valuables in with you (common sense really!) or if you do, give them to staff for safekeeping. Most bedrooms are shared and these are people in very early recovery who haven't yet worked on their behaviours associated with addiction - theft does sometimes happen.

However from a personal safety point of view, I never felt unsafe. My experience is that there's a zero tolerance policy most places when it comes to violent or intimidating behaviour. I've seen residents kicked out for raised voices and threatening body language - it's not tolerated at all. And it rarely arises anyways.

My own advice would be to avoid religious centres unless you're very religious yourself. I got recovery through Coolmine, which is non-religious and just as affordable as Cuan Mhuire. Most residents there (but not all) are coming in from homelessness, as was I. I wouldn't let it put you off if you're serious about working on your recovery.
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26-01-2020, 03:48   #11
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I personally wouldn't stick the saying prayers every day stuff but I have met people who got lasting recovery there.
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28-01-2020, 21:01   #12
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Originally Posted by sparklinglens View Post
Thanks a million. It really helps to hear other people’s perspectives. Can I ask was that your family member’s first rehab stint?

It’s a huge step if I do it and I guess I’m scared. I’ll have to take time off work and tell my manager why and I’m obviously frightened of the stigma, and whether it will make her believe I’m not fit for work. And I don’t know what I’d do about my apartment. (I’m in private rented, sharing at the moment).

There’s a lot to consider but when I hear positive stories like this it really helps.
He tried sobering up at home numerous times but whatever clicked in his head he finally realised it wasn’t working as his doc said he’s just wasting her time and wasting his own coming back every few weeks to get more tablets to help him detox. It all happened so fast in the end considering he was drinking for decades to be honest he never had the right information or the right support to quit. It was his first time in rehab and he threw himself into it. I think he’d hit a point in his life where he wanted more for himself. You know something, the more open you are the more the stigma goes away. I never hid the fact he was in rehab I was so proud of him and my attitude to it rubbed off on other people and if I mentioned it they’d say their uncle was there, or another family member is going through something similar. Addiction is so rampant in this country every single family has been affected in some way or has a relative or friend who’s suffering. The minute you open up about it other people do too. He’s a very private guy but I think ge feels proud of himself now when he tells people he’s off the drink. He still meets people asking where is his local nowadays and he tells them straight out and their reactions have all been positive. You might get the odd eejit but that’s down to their ignorance. But so far if someone feels uncomfortable talking a out it I will actually talk more lol I’m so proud of him..ok he still needs to work on himself but don’t we all but in the space of less than two years he went from having no licence, no car, too sick to work to getting his full licence, full time work and paying is way. I admire anyone who goes in to rehab wether they succeed or not isn’t the point the point is they are willing to try. To be honest I’ve changed Al Anon meetings a few times till I found the one for me (I guess it’s the same for AA meetings) they do not have to be all negative finding one that has a balance of listening and supporting as well as being able to have a laugh afterwards is so important. So once you finish rehab search for something that suits you, coming out of there is when you need to follow the after care advice from the centre and really look after yourself. It’s a scary but exciting time to be honest. But so worth it.
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28-01-2020, 21:03   #13
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I personally wouldn't stick the saying prayers every day stuff but I have met people who got lasting recovery there.
I hear yah, my OH is in no way religious however when he went in he said he was going to participate in everything and just go with the flow it was like he set himself the ultimate challenge. I know I couldn’t stick the praying if I was him. He’s still not religious but he’s also not worshipping at a bar anymore 😄
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28-01-2020, 21:07   #14
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Hi there OP. I was in Cuan Mhuire four and a half years ago as one of four stints in different rehabs for alcohol dependency.

My impression? Much tougher than the other rehabs I was in but far far cheaper. If you have private health insurance you can get into St Pats, Rutland, St John of Gods etc but you only need your social welfare for Cuan Mhuire. It is a 12 week programme so a long stint but it really helps many who go there.

I was in Athy in summer 2015. They put you into a detox unit for the first week where you stay in your PJs and are medicated and under observation. It is a long stint and very, very religious with obligatory prayers, mass and rosary every single day, which I found very off putting. There are also many in there who are from very tough and deprived, criminal backgrounds so you need to keep your head down and not get into a row with anyone. Don't let that put you off -
nearly everyone gets on grand and social time is usually during the smoke breaks and at lunch and later in the evenings.

You will be up at 6.30am every morning, and you will be assigned a job to do during the day. There will be group therapy sessions (really more a series of lessons/programmes) and AA meetings. No mobile phones or anything electronic allowed. There is also a gym which is popular with the younger men. You can make phone calls to your family/friends most evenings when you can get a slot to use the much in demand pay phone.

Visitors are permitted on Saturday and Sunday afternoons for a few hours and you can meet and chat in the cafe and garden centre on site. The grounds of Cuan Mhuire Athy are really beautiful and well kept - they were lovely for walking around in. Leaving the complex, unless for a medical emergency or very important personal business, is not permitted. Occasionally a minibus is available to run people down into Athy town to do light grocery shopping and post office/bank during the week, but you need to book a place for this service.

Cuan Mhuire really does help a lot of people who go there and if you do go, make sure to get the most out of it. Personally, I felt that my final stint in rehab, in the Rutland Centre and then regular AA meetings (nearly every day for the first four months) and sticking with a home AA group, getting a sponsor and working the steps was what helped me finally turn the corner (with great support from my OH).

I wish you well in your recovery journey!
You hit the nail in the head and so important to have support set up for yourself when you get out it makes all the difference I think.
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28-01-2020, 22:19   #15
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Anyone questioning the religious aspect of cuin mhuira shouldn't worry it's just like in school and they make you say prayers or whatever. My brother is their at the moment and he used to complain about the religious stuff but it doesn't bother him now even though hes an atheist.

And op my brother is homeless but that doesn't mean he slept on the streets or anything. He got kicked out of his rented bed sit and had nowhere to go and thays where he ended up. I'm sure most their are like that. And when I was their visiting some actors from fair city were their and an irish boxer and a girl I knew from BlackRock so its not as bad as it sounds. It's a really nice facility I've been inside most of the building on the property at this stage.
I wouldn't think your employer would have a big problem if you explain it well. Trying to sort out the problem before it gets to bad shows your of strong character and hopefully they will see that. The truth is a hell of a lot of people think they have a problem and can relate so hopefully they understand.
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