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01-09-2020, 11:37   #16
SouthWesterly
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...I know that.
So why are you asking?
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01-09-2020, 13:40   #17
Hamsterchops
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Why am I asking?

But my question was about historic structures in town centres. Not stately homes burnt out during the 1920s. Sounds like they just didn't last for whatever reason, shame

Bray Town centre is a good example, the old Town hall (now McDonald's), certainly looks the part (beautiful structure) but was only built in 1883, and not 1653 (for example), as many town centre historic buildings would be in Britain.
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01-09-2020, 15:37   #18
Peregrinus
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Why am I asking?

But my question was about historic structures in town centres. Not stately homes burnt out during the 1920s. Sounds like they just didn't last for whatever reason, shame

Bray Town centre is a good example, the old Town hall (now McDonald's), certainly looks the part (beautiful structure) but was only built in 1883, and not 1653 (for example), as many town centre historic buildings would be in Britain.
There would be few municipal buildings dating from before the 17th century in England. In an ancient city like York, for example, the site of the municipal buildings has been in use for civic buildings since the fifteenth century, but the oldest part of the buildings now standing there dates only from 1811, earlier structures having all been replaced over the years.

Still, there would be more urban buildings from the 17th century and before in England than in Ireland, and this is for three reasons. First, England was a much more urbanised society than Ireland, and therefore there were more urban buildings to begin with, both private and civic. Secondly, England was much richer, and could build to a higher standard, and spend more on maintenance and repair. Thirdly, England was peaceful.

Stone-built buildings will stand for a long time, but otherwise, until people started building in brick, very few buildings lasted more than 100 years, and the great majority lasted less than 50 years. Brick didn't become an affordable building material in England until the seventeenth century, and in Ireland until the eighteenth. Much before that, you had to be fabulously wealthy to build in brick. And nobody in Ireland was fabulously wealthy.

There are a few brick houses surviving in Irish towns from the seventeenth century, mostly incororporated into later structures and remodelled so that they no longer look like seventeenth century houses. I'm not aware of any that are open to the public. Castles, churches, cathedrals and Newgrange aside, the oldest building in Ireland that you can visit would, I think, be the Royal Hospital in Kilmainham - construction started in 1680. It's brick-built.

Last edited by Peregrinus; 01-09-2020 at 17:51.
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01-09-2020, 17:49   #19
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Originally Posted by Hamsterchops View Post
Why am I asking?

But my question was about historic structures in town centres. Not stately homes burnt out during the 1920s. Sounds like they just didn't last for whatever reason, shame

Bray Town centre is a good example, the old Town hall (now McDonald's), certainly looks the part (beautiful structure) but was only built in 1883, and not 1653 (for example), as many town centre historic buildings would be in Britain.

Bray was a collection of mud huts before the coming of the railway.
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01-09-2020, 17:52   #20
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Leamaneh is over the road from me and it's in pretty good nick.

Always thought it would be lovely if it was restored as the likes of Bunratty, but I'm sure it'd cost many millions.
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01-09-2020, 17:54   #21
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The minute the Viking settlement at Wood Quay was built on I kind of gave up.
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01-09-2020, 17:54   #22
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Kilkenny has retained some of its medieval architecture.
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01-09-2020, 17:57   #23
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So many ancient pubs in England & Wales too, hundreds of years old, not so many here. Why?
"Seans Bar" in Athlone

"Sean's Bar is a pub in Athlone, Ireland, notable for its claim of being established around AD 900, which would make it the oldest bar in Ireland and possibly all of Europe."
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01-09-2020, 17:59   #24
Spanish Eyes
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Kilkenny has retained some of its medieval architecture.
It has indeed, lovely spot altogether.

There are a lot of castles around the place, mostly either in ruins or restored and are now high end hotels.

OP, it is a question that kind of answers itself, but is very sad just the same.

When you look at village greens in England and how much has been preserved it is unreal. Some really fabulous spots in England. Have relatives who live in Thame in Oxfordshire. It pains me every time we visit, because so much of the ancient High Street is still there, and it is really picturesque. But it is a working town, and I doubt the natives even see it anymore now. But we did!.

Same goes for a lot of English heritage, their National Trust works hard to keep it going.
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01-09-2020, 18:03   #25
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Waterford has some fine Georgian buildings esp on the Mall, Parnell Street, down the Quays, Georges Street and city end of O'Connell Street.


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Waterford City can boast the finest collection of eighteenth-century architecture in any city in Ireland outside Dublin. This period of Georgian elegance began with the construction in 1741 of the Church of Ireland Bishop’s Palace to a design by the celebrated Richard Castle (d. 1751); the palace was completed by the Waterford-born John Roberts (1712-96).
https://www.buildingsofireland.ie/pl...ishops-palace/
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01-09-2020, 18:06   #26
Spanish Eyes
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Waterford has some fine Georgian buildings esp on the Mall, down the Quays, Georges Street and city end of O'Connell Street.


https://www.buildingsofireland.ie/pl...ishops-palace/
So has Limerick and Dublin.

I think what OP was referring to was the ANCIENT stuff, like the Norman churches, the timber framed housing, the pubs extant since the 16th c or before with uneven floors, the thatched cottages in a cluster, the village green, and so on.

Stratford on Avon is one example.
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01-09-2020, 18:10   #27
Hello 2D Person Below
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Ancient buildings were destroyed by the Brits and various other conquests over the centuries.

Ireland wasn't as backward or destitute as people make out. If not for Irish monks a lot of European history would have been lost.
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01-09-2020, 18:19   #28
selectamatic
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Many town structures and buildings were burned down/destroyed during times of violence too so it's definitely not something confined to stately homes.

Widespread destruction in Dublin during the 1916 rising

The burning of cork
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burning_of_Cork

In Ballaghaderreen Numerous premises burned down in retaliation for the ratra ambush including the 2 of the largest buildings in the town.
https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/h...reen-1.4037571

Many other examples of conflict resulting in widespread damage to buildings in towns all over Ireland.
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01-09-2020, 18:20   #29
Harry Palmr
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So has Limerick and Dublin.

I think what OP was referring to was the ANCIENT stuff, like the Norman churches, the timber framed housing, the pubs extant since the 16th c or before with uneven floors, the thatched cottages in a cluster, the village green, and so on.

Stratford on Avon is one example.
Well Tudor styles in Ireland were basically mud huts! Just like in England for the agrarian populace.

Some "baronial halls" do exist like Carrick as mentioned but considering the centuries of conflict and retribution it's probably not a shock that few "domestic" structures of that era exist. It should be said some exist but as sections of a more modern structure so can be hard to spot.

One of that type in Waterford that is very central in T&H Doolans which was build in 1710 but has features from the 11th century.

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01-09-2020, 18:31   #30
Spanish Eyes
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Well Tudor styles in Ireland were basically mud huts! Just like in England for the agrarian populace.

Some "baronial halls" do exist like Carrick as mentioned but considering the centuries of conflict and retribution it's probably not a shock that few "domestic" structures of that era exist. It should be said some exist but as sections of a more modern structure so can be hard to spot.

One of that type in Waterford that is very central in T&H Doolans which was build in 1710 but has features from the 11th century.

How did that survive? Is it the original or a pastiche do you know..
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