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01-09-2020, 10:42   #1
Hamsterchops
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Why so few historic buildings in Ireland?

Just curious as to why there are so few historic buildings in Irish towns (when compared to Britain)? No timber framed Tudor frontages from 500 years ago, few Cromwellian houses in the middle of towns. Not saying that they don't exist in Ireland it's just that there are so many of them across the water, which begs the question why so few here?

So many ancient pubs in England & Wales too, hundreds of years old, not so many here. Why?

Curious.
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01-09-2020, 10:45   #2
whisky_galore
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Suspect originally built with poorer, substandard materials to start with. Lack of maintenance too.
The mania for "new" things has put paid to many a traditional bar esp from 60s and 70s onwards.
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01-09-2020, 10:45   #3
SouthWesterly
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We where an impoverished colony ruled by landlords from London. No need for nice houses or pubs
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01-09-2020, 10:47   #4
Man with broke phone
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British probably burned them.
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01-09-2020, 10:49   #5
Hamsterchops
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthWesterly View Post
We where an impoverished colony ruled by landlords from London. No need for nice houses or pubs
So either they never existed in the 1st place because we were so poor and impoverished or the British burned them, really? Surely there must have been some Tudor timber framed buildings in Ireland, or did London forbid it?
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01-09-2020, 10:50   #6
Peregrinus
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A few cathedrals aside, there are only a handful of urban buildings surviving in Ireland that predate 1700. This is the result partly of the relative poverty of the country (buildings were not built to last or, if built to last, were replace with newer, larger buildings when times became more prosperous) and partly of the relatively warlike condition of the country (towns were sacked, and buildings trashed or destroyed).

There's any number of older buildings in rural areas - tower houses are common and, of course, a lot of monastic ruins survive. But they were stone-built, whereas urban buildings tended to be timber-framed, with rubble infill and plaster render; only the chimneystacks would be made of brick. We don't get many all-brick houses in Ireland before the 18th century.

Last edited by Peregrinus; 01-09-2020 at 10:57.
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01-09-2020, 10:51   #7
antimatterx
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I think Irish architecture is poor, especially compared to the British. Irish buildings are very plain and lack any sort of imagination.
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01-09-2020, 10:56   #8
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Ormond Castle in Carrick on Suir would be mostly Tudor, I think.
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01-09-2020, 10:57   #9
CrabRevolution
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peregrinus View Post
A few cathedrals aside, there are only a handful of urban buildings surviving in Ireland that predate 1700. This is the result partly of the relative poverty of the country (buildings were not built to last or, if built to last, were replace with newer, larger buildings when times became more prosperous) and partly of the relatively warlike condition of the country (towns were sacked, and buildings trashed or destroyed).

There's any number of older buildings in rural areas - tower houses are common and, of course, a lot of monastic ruins survive. But they were stone-built, whereas urban buildings tended to be timber-framed.
That's my take on it too. Just thinking about the towns I frequent and aside from medieval ruins, the next oldest buildings are from the 18th and 19th centuries. The Tudor or "Cromwellian" (I've never heard that phrase used to describe architecture) buildings the OP mentions don't seem to have lasted 200 years, never mind 500.
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01-09-2020, 11:06   #10
Hamsterchops
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Originally Posted by CrabRevolution View Post
That's my take on it too. Just thinking about the towns I frequent and aside from medieval ruins, the next oldest buildings are from the 18th and 19th centuries. The Tudor or "Cromwellian" (I've never heard that phrase used to describe architecture) buildings the OP mentions don't seem to have lasted 200 years, never mind 500.
Cromwellian, as in from that period of history.

Yes, apart from the odd castle and stately home there are very few towns where you can walk through the doors and be transported back three, four, five or six hundred years as you sit beside a giant fireplace and sip on a pint.
That's what I'm talking about.
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01-09-2020, 11:06   #11
sydthebeat
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https://www.buildingsofireland.ie/

only 65,000
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01-09-2020, 11:06   #12
Peregrinus
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Originally Posted by antimatterx View Post
I think Irish architecture is poor, especially compared to the British. Irish buildings are very plain and lack any sort of imagination.
For much of the time, Irish architecture is basically the same as British architecture, but with less money spent on it.

There are a couple of exceptions - Irish plasterwork of the 18th century, at its best, is superior to anything you will find in Britain, for example. But in general Irish architecture was the poor provincial relation of British architecture.
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01-09-2020, 11:10   #13
Hamsterchops
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So where have so many of our ancient buildings gone, and why are there so many if them still standing across the water?

Not talking quality of plasterwork, or ornate frontages, just common historic buildings from town centres.
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01-09-2020, 11:13   #14
Ward J. Littell
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Many of the old country houses were burned down during and after the War of Independence.
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01-09-2020, 11:15   #15
Hamsterchops
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...I know that.
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