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15-10-2009, 13:39   #1
pc11
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Orthotics supplier recommendation?

Hi,

I need to replace my very old orthotics. Can anyone recommend a physio or other supplier in Dublin? Ideally someone with an interest in running.

Also, preferably a practitioner whose fees can be reimbursed from VHI? I presume that has to be a physio rather than some other types?

Does anyone know about that?
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15-10-2009, 14:24   #2
baldykav
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I've been to a few with varying results but decided eventually that i needed solid answers so went to the UK. if you're willing to do the same go to one of the best guys out there www.cliftonbradeley.co.uk. Cheap flight to Manchester, train to Stoke on Trent. Day trip.

He won't make you stand a stupid box of foam, or take plaster casts of your feet. It's all digital and his knowledge of Biomechanics is second to none. He has a specialist team that make the orthotics in line with the results of your 2-3hr assesment. The orthotics are ready to test straight away and you take them home with you.

Most places here have to send them off the info/molds to the US/Canada and wait a few weeks to be sent back, making basic obvious changes if required can be difficult.

He is the man when it comes to orthotics. Probably cost you 600 euro total including flights etc but worth every penny in my opinion.

Check out his website, it'll give you all the info' you need. He seen guys like Michael Owen, Tom Chamney etc so is highly thought of.
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15-10-2009, 17:49   #3
daviddwyer
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Went to leinster clinic in maynooth....Eamonn O’ Muircheartaigh's place

David Kingston in the Biomechanics Foot Lab was brilliant. Really knows his stuff. Did take a few weeks to get orthotics but couldnt fault the service. Was able to claim back from quinn life
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15-10-2009, 17:56   #4
henryporter
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I went to a place called the Apex Clinic in Belfast - Martin McGeough was the Podiatrist there. The orthotics are then made in Sligo, all in all takes about a month from diagnosis to finished orthotics.

A word of advice, as I found to my detriment - VHI will not cover orthotics or podiatry unless you are referred by a consultant - not a physiotherapist.

The stirling rate makes it very worth while heading north too.
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15-10-2009, 21:44   #5
daviddwyer
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Agree... have to be referred to by a consultant. Even if VHI wont cover... you can definitely claim on Revenue MED 1 as long as they are prescribed (ie not purchased on internet or the like)
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16-10-2009, 21:53   #6
The Lone Ranger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daviddwyer View Post
Went to leinster clinic in maynooth....Eamonn O’ Muircheartaigh's place

David Kingston in the Biomechanics Foot Lab was brilliant. Really knows his stuff. Did take a few weeks to get orthotics but couldnt fault the service. Was able to claim back from quinn life
big +1
went to david and found him great.
got orthotics from other physios but they where crap compared to what i got from david ,he examined everything(walking, running, standing...) but what i really liked was the way he explained everything. wish more health pros where like this.

covered by my insurance too

well recommend him
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18-10-2009, 13:53   #7
pc11
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thanks

Thanks folks, those are interesting recommendations which I will check out.
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18-10-2009, 15:54   #8
mithril
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daviddwyer View Post
Agree... have to be referred to by a consultant. Even if VHI wont cover... you can definitely claim on Revenue MED 1 as long as they are prescribed (ie not purchased on internet or the like)
Quinn Healthcare will refund 50% of the charges up to a maximum annual contribution of €150.00 and the referral can be through a physiotherapist.
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18-10-2009, 20:30   #9
Eire Go Brach
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Joseph Kelly In Old Bawn Tallaght. I found him great. I like you, searched around a fair bit before I decided on him. He apparently does alot of the Rugby players.
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17-11-2009, 14:02   #10
macco66
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A bit of advice please folks!

I've been attending my physio for shin splints caused by running. Now, I've a lot of time for the guy and think he's a great physio, but the orthotics that he's recommending me are going to set me back about 300 quid. Whereas I completely trust the fella and he carries out the foot scan himself with all the latest software, I just don't have 300 euro to spare as I've recently lost my job.

Any recommendations from anyone regards finding cheaper orthotics without too much compromise on quality?

I'm under the family V.H.I. plan also if that's any help.

Cheers.

Edit: I'm in South Dublin.

Last edited by macco66; 17-11-2009 at 14:03. Reason: Further info
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17-11-2009, 14:08   #11
 
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Yeah, i could give you the number of a guy in sligo that uses a material that he attaches to the soles in your shoes and you wont even need orthotics. Trust me on this. He charges 40e for an hour.
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17-11-2009, 14:14   #12
macco66
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Are they interchangeable between all shoes bud, or do they stay attached to the one pair?

I'll deffo take the number off you regardless. Can't hurt!

Cheers.
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17-11-2009, 15:33   #13
 
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From my own experience, i used to transfer the insoles from one pair of runners into another pair. I did quite alot of mileage and so always stuck to the same design of trainer(in my case I wore asics 2130s). i was told a long time ago that by constantly changing to different designs of motion control trainers ie normal trainers that you would do the majority of your runs in, that this changing MAY lead to imbalances due to heavy mileage and in turn cause injury.

however, back to the point, this material that this guy will give you is a rubbery material that will act as an orthotic without locking up your arches. he uses super glue to insert this material to the bottom of your insoles that come with your trainers. These will last you quite a while depending on you mileage, normally 6-8months for 60+ mile per week. and a lot more if you run on the road(i did most of mine on grass that was usually wet as we live in this country!). What im getting at is the damp that gets into your shoes is the main factor of wearing the rubber out, but it still takes months of grinding for this to bear a need to get more material inserted.

The guys name is Pat McManus who lives just outside Grange in County sligo. An absolute gentleman and quite ahead of his time(very intelligent).

His number is: 071 91 66195

And hes not the kind of guy that bull s h i t s you.
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21-10-2010, 22:46   #14
keredlp
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Different materials for different tasks

As I add orthotics to my clinical role as a physiotherapist, it is worth noting the task at hand. Running generates a lot more muscle torque (having a stabilising effect) and generally running shoes can cope well (although someone I met in the industry said for elite athlete models up to 30% of all running shoes tested were defective.....the price of mass production!)

Often, well trained runners only need a soft orthotic as a proprioceptive guide for heel strike and maybe a mild forefoot adjustment if the foot malaligns later in stance. More haphazard runners or late starters will need more help inside the shoe but usually this clears up their symptoms straight away.

Often my runners, if flat-footed, will wear a slightly firmer device during their normal daily activities to retrain the foot. Neither devices "lock up" the foot if well prescribed and can cost very little.

ICB Medical work the best for me and their assessment system is simple and effective. Patients love them and they fit well in almost all shoes (narrow and heeled shoes will always require a functional comprimise). A good therapist should also manipulate the foot to free up malalignments and this should always be done prior to a customised orthotic being casted.
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