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11-03-2018, 09:21   #2
Tilikum17
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It was a great idea by the HR manager in fairness.
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11-03-2018, 09:24   #3
daheff
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Saw this and thought it was a wonderful story.

Fair play to them all
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11-03-2018, 09:36   #4
Rosie Rant
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Not one employee refused, not even those who never met him. Such a heart warming story. I hope the little boy will be OK.
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11-03-2018, 10:42   #5
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It's an example of one of those rare times in life where there's a win/win situation all round. The dad got to stay with his son without losing his job or income, the company lost no money or working time (and gained enormous kudos) while the work colleagues got to help in a practical way at a time when people simply don't know what to say or do.

I'd love to see this copied elsewhere. Obviously, it was a big company and people didn't need to overextend their overtime donation, but it's a fabulous template.
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11-03-2018, 10:47   #6
 
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No mention if the company themselves donated anything. Pretty pathetic if they didn't.
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11-03-2018, 10:57   #7
kneemos
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Originally Posted by Rosie Rant View Post
Not one employee refused, not even those who never met him. Such a heart warming story. I hope the little boy will be OK.

Couldn't very well refuse could they.
Wouldn't be a fan of this kind forced charity.
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11-03-2018, 11:04   #8
 
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Couldn't very well refuse could they.
Wouldn't be a fan of this kind forced charity.
Jesus, 2.5 hours a week for 2 weeks is hardly forcing them to hand over a kidney, and for this they get huge amounts of peace of mind. First of all they did a great thing, money can't buy that feeling.

PLUS, they know they work in a company where there is now an established policy, semi-official that the workers will look out for each other.

That's priceless.
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11-03-2018, 11:04   #9
Old Perry
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Couldn't very well refuse could they.
Wouldn't be a fan of this kind forced charity.
Sure you could, if I couldn't afford to I wouldn't donate, but if you can afford it you'd have to be pretty heartless not to want to help.
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11-03-2018, 11:08   #10
khaldrogo
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Couldn't very well refuse could they. Wouldn't be a fan of this kind forced charity.

Maybe your opinion would change if you were that father......
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11-03-2018, 11:19   #11
RoYoBo
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Couldn't very well refuse could they.
Wouldn't be a fan of this kind forced charity.
Out of all the charitable acts and donations available to me, this direct and measurable effort would be top of my list. I'm sure workers could have refused if they didn't feel like helping.

If 5 hours extra working time to help a person in need was too much for someone, why would what others might think of their refusal force them into doing it?
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11-03-2018, 11:54   #12
 
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This is verging on emotional blackmail.

You are not allowed to say no to something like this even if you have to.

I agree that it a phenomenal gesture but what would have happened if it was purely voluntary.
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11-03-2018, 11:56   #13
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Charity and decency at its best. I knew somebody who works in Dublin Fire Brigade and his child was seriously ill in Crumlin Children's Hospital for years and his colleagues had a rota to cover his hours during that incredibly stressful time. It was very little extra to each of them as so many pulled their weight but it meant the world to that family. There remains a hugely inspiring culture of volunteerism in this country and so many of us have been blessed by being touched by that meitheal culture.

And to think there's some ineffably miserable bastards here who wouldn't even clean the snow off the path in front of their house - 'let the old people slip and break their legs - it's not my path!'. The mind boggles at such miserable, myopic fúcktard existences.
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11-03-2018, 11:57   #14
 
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but what would have happened if it was purely voluntary.
It wasn't compulsory, anyone could have refused. But, seemingly the company is deficient in its number of crabby, selfish fcukers.
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11-03-2018, 12:05   #15
 
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It wasn't compulsory, anyone could have refused. But, seemingly the company is deficient in its number of crabby, selfish fcukers.
So Easy.
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