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Are the electric scooters legal in Ireland or are still in a grey area?

03.01.2019 09:16 #16
Originally posted by beauf
.. 50 would make them faster than car limit in many places. Which seems illogical.


What I meant was to follow same speed limits as cars and motorbikes... But most of the scooter riders including me, won't go faster than 35-40 km/h anyway.
03.01.2019 09:31 #17
A wholly unreasonable man
Originally posted by Martynet
Originally posted by beauf
.. 50 would make them faster than car limit in many places. Which seems illogical.


What I meant was to follow same speed limits as cars and motorbikes... But most of the scooter riders including me, won't go faster than 35-40 km/h anyway.

From mairead earlier:

The Road Safety Authority (RSA) considers that an electric scooter may be a mechanically propelled vehicle which if in a public place is subject to all of the regulatory controls applying to other vehicles which include that it be roadworthy, registered, taxed and insured. A user of an electric scooter must hold an appropriate driving licence and a crash helmet. It is illegal for a person under the age of 16 to use a mechanically propelled vehicle in a public place.


So looks like you'll need to get it VRT'd (tiny cost), then a license plate which will look comical, then taxed (tenner a month), and even then it still won't be road worthy as you won't get insured on it by anyone.


As for the won't go faster than 35/40, that is simply rubbish. People are people, if it can get upto 50kmph without obstruction and people can handle it, they will do it.
03.01.2019 16:42 #18
Registered User
Originally posted by my3cents

So what was wrong?

However, Xiaomi's Mi Electric Scooter requires a manual push start like an electric bicycle. Ebikes are not required to be taxed and insured, nor do they require a driver's licence.


E bikes have to cut off their power the moment you stop pedalling. 


the law talking about the cycle to work scheme has a definition


http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/eli/2008/act/25/section/7/enacted/en/html



‘ pedelec ’ means a bicycle or tricycle which is equipped with an auxiliary electric motor having a maximum continuous rated power of 0.25 kilowatts, of which output is progressively reduced and finally cut off as the vehicle reaches a speed of 25 kilometres per hour, or sooner if the cyclist stops pedalling;
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