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30.12.2016 19:24 #1
Hello, I have a PC that uses approx. 650Watts I was just wondering what the cost per hour of running this system?

Kind Regards
03.01.2017 09:40 #2
Hi Sol7,

Thanks for your message.

The basic unit of electricity is the Kilowatt hour (kWh). One kWh is the amount of energy used by a 1kW (1000 watt) electric heater for one hour. Another example is ten 100-watt light bulbs used for one hour.

If the PC uses 650 watts per hour, it would take approximately one and a half hours to reach a thousand watts, or 1kW.

The total number of units used is then multiplied by your unit rate, which determines the cost of running the PC.

For example, the standard unit rate is 0.1513 per unit, excluding VAT. As such, the cost of running the computer for one and a half hours would be €0.1513, excluding VAT.

Further information on the length of time it takes to make a unit of electricity can be found online here. If you would like to further understand the energy usage of other appliances in your home, we would recommend using the My Energy Pal app, which can be found here.

We hope this helps. If you have any other questions please let us know.

Thanks,
Brige

________
1 thank
12.03.2017 21:27 #3
Registered User
Originally posted by Electric Ireland: Brige
Hi Sol7,

Thanks for your message.

The basic unit of electricity is the Kilowatt hour (kWh). One kWh is the amount of energy used by a 1kW (1000 watt) electric heater for one hour. Another example is ten 100-watt light bulbs used for one hour.

If the PC uses 650 watts per hour, it would take approximately one and a half hours to reach a thousand watts, or 1kW.

The total number of units used is then multiplied by your unit rate, which determines the cost of running the PC.

For example, the standard unit rate is 0.1513 per unit, excluding VAT. As such, the cost of running the computer for one and a half hours would be €0.1513, excluding VAT.

Further information on the length of time it takes to make a unit of electricity can be found online here. If you would like to further understand the energy usage of other appliances in your home, we would recommend using the My Energy Pal app, which can be found here.

We hope this helps. If you have any other questions please let us know.

Thanks,
Brige

________

Easy to calculate 1kWh = €0.1513
-so-
0.650kWh = €0.1513 * 0.65 = €0.1
-so-
1 hour of 650W costs 10 cents + Vat
1 thank
15.03.2017 12:59 #4
Originally posted by Sol7
Hello, I have a PC that uses approx. 650Watts I was just wondering what the cost per hour of running this system?

Kind Regards

Your PC wouldn't be pulling 650W all the time when it is on though. That's just the rating of the power supply.
08.05.2020 08:42 #5
Originally posted by zom
Originally posted by Electric Ireland: Brige
Hi Sol7,

Thanks for your message.

The basic unit of electricity is the Kilowatt hour (kWh). One kWh is the amount of energy used by a 1kW (1000 watt) electric heater for one hour. Another example is ten 100-watt light bulbs used for one hour.

If the PC uses 650 watts per hour, it would take approximately one and a half hours to reach a thousand watts, or 1kW.

The total number of units used is then multiplied by your unit rate, which determines the cost of running the PC.

For example, the standard unit rate is 0.1513 per unit, excluding VAT. As such, the cost of running the computer for one and a half hours would be €0.1513, excluding VAT.


Thanks,
Brige

________

Easy to calculate 1kWh = €0.1513
-so-
0.650kWh = €0.1513 * 0.65 = €0.1
-so-
1 hour of 650W costs 10 cents + Vat

thanks a  lot!
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