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Kicking the habit! :)

  • 01-10-2014 1:05am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 9 ✭✭✭ MacCanann


    Hey, I’ve been lurking about on here for a few weeks at a time but it’s my first time signing up to the boards. It’s been really encouraging to read all your stories and to see the level of honesty and support that you all offer one another. After ten years of on and off alcohol abuse I’m serious about giving up the drink for good and I can see the benefits of having a place like this to help me do that.

    Serious binge drinking is my problem, I can’t have one or two drinks. I had my first drink on a school trip to Barcelona when I was 16 and ended up balcony climbing on the third floor of our hotel. I didn’t drink then until I was 18. I was a sensible enough drinker for the next three years, partly because I was in college, still living at home and hadn’t the time or money to be drinking, I really kept my head down. Around the time I turned 21 and got my first real job I started going out maybe once every two or three weeks, that’s when I began my losing battle to the drink. Before going out I’d drink a bottle of wine, which then over the space of a few months turned into two bottles of wine, followed by a few cans. I was pissed before I even left the house. There was many occasions where I was so drunk I’d have to be collected and was back home in bed before 10.30pm! Dying the next morning I’d say to myself never again and three weeks later I’d find myself in the exact same or a similar if not worse situation.

    I’m sick and tired of living in this two or three week cycle of serious binge drinking. I’m sick of the shame and embarrassment that comes with it. I’m sorry for all the crap my family and friends have had to endure. I’m going to really try to kick the habit this time, it has gotten the better of me one too many times!


Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10,562 ✭✭✭✭ Sunnyisland


    MacCanann wrote: »


    I’m sick and tired of living in this two or three week cycle of serious binge drinking. I’m sick of the shame and embarrassment that comes with it. I’m sorry for all the crap my family and friends have had to endure. I’m going to really try to kick the habit this time, it has gotten the better of me one too many times!



    So what's your plan and what you gona do about it ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 9 ✭✭✭ MacCanann


    I'm just taking each day and weekend as it comes man. So far so good, haven't had a drop of the stuff or stepped inside a pub since the All-Ireland final between Donegal and Kerry, just over two weeks ago! I feel good :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10,562 ✭✭✭✭ Sunnyisland


    MacCanann wrote: »
    I'm just taking each day and weekend as it comes man. So far so good, haven't had a drop of the stuff or stepped inside a pub since the All-Ireland final between Donegal and Kerry, just over two weeks ago! I feel good :)

    Well done MaCanann in taking it one step at a time ,but you will heed to be prepared for the witching hours and huge temptation that certainally will come your way,here is a post from before, hope it helps, also these are only guidelines any sort of plan will do


    I have made the suggestion to people here to "get a plan" for their recovery from alcohol abuse. The old phrase: "failing to plan is planning to fail" is very true in so many situations... and especially so in the case of those of us who are beginning (and continuing) the path of freedom from the devastation of alcohol abuse.

    SO: What is a plan, and how do I get one?
    Exercise (doesn't have to be a whole lot; some brisk walking, 3 or 4 days a week, is helpful)
    Hypnotherapy
    Meditation (many of us practice meditation)
    Dietary supplements
    A healthy diet, and regular meals
    Medication (preferably with help, advice, and a prescription from your physician)
    Spending a significant amount of time here or other like minded websites, reading the posts of others, getting to know people, asking questions, and talking about your progress and your struggles
    Going to AA meetings
    Changing our environment: Getting alcohol out of the house; not going to bars; not hanging around with "drinking buddies"
    Most people do not use ALL elements in this list; but those who are successful tend to use a LOT of them. And we tend to adjust and tweak the elements, as we see what works for us (and for others).

    Equally important is something we call the "mental game." This is short-hand for the process of changing our thinking and attitudes toward: alcohol, drinking, our emotions, and our behavior. We must learn a whole new approach to problems in life (we don't try to drink them away, any more), and we don't see alcohol as a "reward" for having accomplished something. We learn to tolerate distress, including the urges and impulses and cravings for drink, and we allow them to naturally pass away, without giving in to them. We learn not to engage in battles within our minds about drinking; we step away from that whole process, and choose to think about, and do, something else.

    Perhaps most important: we recognize that the work of recovery truly is "work," and it takes time, effort, and sometimes it costs money. Sometimes it is costly in other ways, as well; friendships and other close relationships will be changed, when we change. And that can be painful. Making this kind of change will have an impact on all areas of our lives; that is a very, very good thing; it can also be accompanied by some pain. Again... we must learn to tolerate the discomforts involved in life changes. There will be some emotional upheaval along the way. We might want to seek counseling or psychotherapy; we certainly will benefit from coming here and talking about it.

    Making a plan, and following it, is an act of mature recognition of the fact that, for nearly all of us, just wishing and hoping that we will stop drinking (or begin drinking "normally") "on our own" is not going to work. Remember: nobody ever "wished and hoped" their way through any important project. But with persistence, and support from others, following a plan can take us to the places in our lives where we really want to go.


  • Registered Users Posts: 375 ✭✭ hubba


    +1 on everything Realies said.

    I think you also need to get your head around the fact that you will never drink again, you are becoming a NON drinker. A certain amount of mourning is involved. Like splitting up with an abusive partner, you know you are doing the right thing but sometimes you just crave the old life, the familiarity of it. You have to be ready to say no, I can do this, I don't need to go back. Moving forward with your life can be lonely at first, so that's where the planning that Realies mentions really becomes important.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9 ✭✭✭ MacCanann


    Thanks so much for the advice Realies and Hubba, it really is much appreciated! :) I'd be a fool not to take heed of your wise words. Glad to report that I'm still off the drink, but I can now see how I'd benefit from some planning in the long term.

    I've decided to start yoga classes as well as guitar lessons on the weekends to keep me busy and for something to look forward to come Friday or Saturday night.


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