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Joining the Guardi without education?

  • 24-03-2014 2:58am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ RubberIRL


    Hello,

    I am currently in sixth year right now and I have always wanted to become a guard. I know myself I will not get high points in the leaving and don't plan on going to college to do any law courses since I will not get the points. Is there anyway I can still get into the guards without a good leaving or a degree in something to do with law?

    Is there any loop holes or anything that could help me get into the guards easier or is there anywhere I can study law without having to get any high points or anything?

    Thanks in advance,
    RubberIRL


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 4,593 ✭✭✭ Aint Eazy Being Cheezy


    Your attitude is lacking, and that will be picked up at the interview stage, presuming you get there. Why don't you google "Garda entry requirements" for starters?


  • Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ RubberIRL


    Your attitude is lacking, and that will be picked up at the interview stage, presuming you get there. Why don't you google "Garda entry requirements" for starters?

    I don't have the right attitude towards school and I know that, that's why I asked is there any loop holes for people who are not good in school but have the abilities and ambitions to become a guard. I have done this already but I want to know is there any alternatives instead of having a degree or a good leaving cert.


  • Registered Users Posts: 37,525 ✭✭✭✭ the_syco


    RubberIRL wrote: »
    I don't have the right attitude towards school and I know that
    How do you think you'll be learning the law? Not via classroom?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,753 ✭✭✭ carzony


    No person will be recruited into the garda without education.. well unless they have an impressive amount of work experience.. I'd bet the majority of people recruited by the gardai in the next few years will have college education of some kind..

    The world is changing and so is the standard of employees.. you should atleast do a FETAC course or somthing.. Garda recruitment is over for the next 3 years again anyway so you have plenty of time to kill...


  • Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ RubberIRL


    carzony wrote: »
    No person will be recruited into the garda without education.. well unless they have an impressive amount of work experience.. I'd bet the majority of people recruited by the gardai in the next few years will have college education of some kind..

    The world is changing and so is the standard of employees.. you should atleast do a FETAC course or somthing.. Garda recruitment is over for the next 3 years again anyway so you have plenty of time to kill...

    I will be completing my leaving, what I want to know is there any courses under 300 points that would help me get in? Would any course at all such as computers help me get in also?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,593 ✭✭✭ Aint Eazy Being Cheezy


    No loopholes, thankfully. Minimum entry requirements is Leaving Cert and you must pass maths and two languages. One of those being either English or Irish.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,174 ✭✭✭ sdanseo


    There's plenty of chance of getting in while meeting the minimum requirements, but in reality you'd need to blow them away at interview to beat the sort of competition that's out there. Remember 25,000 people applied this time.

    We've been told they won't recruit again until 2017 (the most recent applications will provide recruits in 2014, 2015 and 2016) so that leaves you plenty of time to do some things that will help you out. There's loads of time left to get a great leaving, if you're reasonably intelligent and good at retaining information like myself (my head is a sponge) then you can walk a decent leaving with two or three months of hard work beginning immediately.

    After that, don't assume you need a law degree or even a relevant degree. While it might stand to you in interview, ANY bachelor's degree will boost your chances and your pay on attestation. If you don't think you can apply yourself to a course of study that isn't hands-on or you don't really enjoy (and trust me, that's me defined and I'm somehow in final year of an honours degree) then look at night courses while maybe working a menial job for a few years. We've all done it!


  • Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ RubberIRL


    sdeire wrote: »
    There's plenty of chance of getting in while meeting the minimum requirements, but in reality you'd need to blow them away at interview to beat the sort of competition that's out there. Remember 25,000 people applied this time.

    We've been told they won't recruit again until 2017 (the most recent applications will provide recruits in 2014, 2015 and 2016 - [url=]source[/url]) so that leaves you plenty of time to do some things that will help you out. There's loads of time left to get a great leaving, if you're reasonably intelligent and good at retaining information like myself (my head is a sponge) then you can walk a decent leaving with two or three months of hard work beginning immediately.

    After that, don't assume you need a law degree or even a relevant degree. While it might stand to you in interview, ANY bachelor's degree will boost your chances and your pay on attestation. Look at night courses while maybe working a menial job for a few years. We've all done it!

    This is the type of answer I was looking for!

    I mean I'm average in most of my classes so I could easily meet the entry requirements, the problem for me is standing out from the pack. Do you think joining the army for three years could be a good idea or maybe doing some security training or something like that could be a good idea for me to stand out for the 25k people?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,593 ✭✭✭ Aint Eazy Being Cheezy


    That's different to what you asked first! It's not a "loop hole" but time served in the civil defence is looked upon favourably, and time spent in the reserve Garda force is required to be taken into account. Either of those would stand to you in addition to meeting the minimum requirements.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ RubberIRL


    That's different to what you asked first! It's not a "loop hole" but time served in the civil defence is looked upon favourably, and time spent in the reserve Garda force is required to be taken into account. Either of those would stand to you in addition to meeting the minimum requirements.

    That could be an option so. I have applied for the Garda Reserve but have heard nothing back as of yet.

    Thanks for the help!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 9,174 ✭✭✭ sdanseo


    RubberIRL wrote: »
    This is the type of answer I was looking for!

    I mean I'm average in most of my classes so I could easily meet the entry requirements, the problem for me is standing out from the pack. Do you think joining the army for three years could be a good idea or maybe doing some security training or something like that could be a good idea for me to stand out for the 25k people?

    In theory, yes to both.

    In practice, the security industry is viewed as full of people not qualified to, not arsed to, or who have failed to get into, a career in policing. The army will look for a minimum term of service I believe. They're not going to train you only for you to bail to the Gardaí at the first chance.

    Get the head down, try and grab a decent LC. I only got 330 points with literally no study, if I'd started studying hard at this time of the year, although I find it really unbearable to learn stuff by rote with the benefit of hindsight I probably could have come out with >450.

    Sometimes the people who find it hardest to apply themselves but who at the same time want to do well are the ones with the most intelligence, I had brains to burn but HATE institutional education and found it hard to attend.The same applied to college but not nearly so much because you get to choose something you're interested in. Find something that interests you and avail of free fees while they still exist. Do basket weaving in UCC if it floats your boat.

    If you start in 2014 and they recruit in 2017 you can normally exit early with a degree award and bingo, you've had three years of college and the associated drunken adventures, a nice degree under your arm and potentially a Garda Career.

    Dealing in best case scenarios is all great but you can't win the lotto if you don't buy a ticket, and if you get that analogy you'll probably do just fine.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ RubberIRL


    sdeire wrote: »
    In theory, yes to both.

    In practice, the security industry is viewed as full of people not qualified to, not arsed to, or who have failed to get into, a career in policing. The army will look for a minimum term of service I believe. They're not going to train you only for you to bail to the Gardaí at the first chance.

    Get the head down, try and grab a decent LC. I only got 330 points with literally no study, if I'd started studying hard at this time of the year, although I find it really unbearable to learn stuff by rote with the benefit of hindsight I probably could have come out with >450.

    Sometimes the people who find it hardest to apply themselves but who at the same time want to do well are the ones with the most intelligence, I had brains to burn but HATE institutional education and found it hard to attend.The same applied to college but not nearly so much because you get to choose something you're interested in. Find something that interests you and avail of free fees while they still exist. Do basket weaving in UCC if it floats your boat.

    If you start in 2014 and they recruit in 2017 you can normally exit early with a degree award and bingo, you've had three years of college and the associated drunken adventures, a nice degree under your arm and potentially a Garda Career.

    Dealing in best case scenarios is all great but you can't win the lotto if you don't buy a ticket, and if you get that analogy you'll probably do just fine.

    I thought I was too late to start the whole studying stuff but I'll start to cop on a little in school...I hope! I'm after looking up some courses there and I'm after finding something appealing to me. There is one Night time course that I need only 5 passes in the LC which would be handy enough and a level 6 course for a higher cert in arts in legal studies.

    Have a look for yourself:
    http://www.wit.ie/courses/school/humanities/department_of_applied_arts/higher_certificate_inarts_in_legal_studies

    I could then go from there and do this course to add onto that:
    http://www.wit.ie/courses/school/humanities/department_of_applied_arts/ba_in_legal_studies

    Do you think this would make me stand out a little better?

    Thanks for the help, really greatfull!


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,174 ✭✭✭ sdanseo


    Looks like the way to go if the legal area interests you and you don't get the points for the Level 7/8 courses directly.

    Remember two things:

    1. Aim for the Level 8 points from your LC. Unrealistic goals make for achievable results higher than would otherwise be attained. Level 6 is just about useless for anything other than a stepping stone to something higher, don't even contemplate stopping there.

    2. Remember that if you do get a legal degree, then with a good result in the FE-1 you could make exponentially more in a year than a Garda ever will ;) At this stage you gotta check if it's a vocation to policing you have or just a whim.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ RubberIRL


    Well at least I'd be learning something that's appealing to the job. At the end of it all I'd use the level 6 as a stepping stone to get a level 7. Other than that I would of planned on going for a level 7 IT course but I don't know if that would benefit me in becoming a guard would it?

    And as for the second one, I guess it could just be a whim but I like the look of the work they do, getting to be out and not stuck in all day and the job changes a little. I know they do some computer work and paper work and things like that but I wouldn't mind that too much. I have never really looked into being a solicitor but hey, could be on option.

    Haha I'm sick right now, can't be going to school when I'm sick:P


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,402 ✭✭✭ Royal Irish


    Someone I know didn't have a great leaving and done sports science or something like that in DKIT and he also played a lot of GAA, and last time I seen him he was 27 and a detective I think. He was in plain clothes with one of those blue garda jackets that look like a flimsy rain coat.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ RubberIRL


    Someone I know didn't have a great leaving and done sports science or something like that in DKIT and he also played a lot of GAA, and last time I seen him he was 27 and a detective I think. He was in plain clothes with one of those blue garda jackets that look like a flimsy rain coat.

    Being a detective is exactly what I want to do...either that or drug squad. Jesus, that's a fairly young age to become a detective though, must start playing GAA or something meself!


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,909 ✭✭✭ SeantheMan


    Well I would make sure you know their name first.
    Guardi is not a word as far as I'm aware, in English or Irish

    Gardaí or An Garda Síochána


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,033 ✭✭✭ murphym7


    I doubt you will be a detective, try posting in here: http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/forumdisplay.php?f=1081 It’s the Garda recruitment forum.:D


  • Registered Users Posts: 617 only1kilbane


    SeantheMan wrote: »
    Well I would make sure you know their name first.
    Guardi is not a word as far as I'm aware, in English or Irish

    Gardaí or An Garda Síochána

    Really are some smarmy condescending people on this thread. The lad is just looking for a heads up on how he could stand out when it comes to interview stage.

    Things like community work, garda reserve, club membership are all beneficial for the interview process. If you meet the minimum requirements educationally the likes of the above will benefit you a lot more than someoen with a Masters or who got 550 points in their leaving.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,772 ✭✭✭ jameshayes


    Really are some smarmy condescending people on this thread. The lad is just looking for a heads up on how he could stand out when it comes to interview stage.

    Things like community work, garda reserve, club membership are all beneficial for the interview process. If you meet the minimum requirements educationally the likes of the above will benefit you a lot more than someoen with a Masters or who got 550 points in their leaving.

    I think it might be useful to know how to spell the profession that he has such high hopes for.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,122 Starscream25


    RubberIRL wrote: »
    I will be completing my leaving, what I want to know is there any courses under 300 points that would help me get in? Would any course at all such as computers help me get in also?

    Exercise and health studies in Waterford IT is around 275 points, I was no genius in school and just about got into this course, like a lot of level 8 courses It was difficult to get through, a number of my classmates went on to become gardai so maybe you could look into that as a possible route. I'd imagine at an interview stage it would be quite beneficial to be able to talk about a health and exercise background. Anyway good luck with whatever you decide.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,652 ✭✭✭ el diablo


    Your attitude is lacking, and that will be picked up at the interview stage, presuming you get there. Why don't you google "Garda entry requirements" for starters?

    Lose the "hahatude".

    We're all in this psy-op together.🤨



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,316 ✭✭✭ JustAThought


    Poor education, lack of attention to detail & high hopes - sounds like you'll fit right in tbh.


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