Mods please check the Moderators Group for an important update on Mod tools. If you do not have access to the group, please PM Niamh. Thanks!

Post pics of your watches Part II *Please NO QUOTING PHOTOS*

1828385878894

Comments

  • #2


    colm18 wrote: »

    I'm now the proud owner of "a mechanical watch that costs less than your shoes, and feels like it should cost less than your socks" :pac::pac::pac:

    Thanks Fitz! (I'll think of your immortal words every time I wear it :D )

    Looks like you need to wear that on your ankle, not your wrist. ;)


  • #2


    Fitz II wrote: »
    With thanks to Deep Thought of this parish. My first IWC, very different from what I usually wear.

    What have I done…..😟😟😟😢😢

    Have no fear I will have another after I visit the Masters..ðŸŒ️*♂️ðŸŒ️*♂️ðŸŒ️*♂️


  • #2


    attachment.php?attachmentid=556049&stc=1&d=1623866082

    Few enough were innocent in the past, few enough are innocent in the present, we just don’t know why yet.



  • #2


    ^ :) Been awhile since you posted my favorite Wibbs! Now I can relate to the hunt you went on tracking down that bracelet for it! :D


  • #2


    Wibbs wrote: »
    snippy snip snip

    I looked at that for 30 min and I went from wtf to I want that:)


  • #2


    :D:D

    Few enough were innocent in the past, few enough are innocent in the present, we just don’t know why yet.



  • #2


    I looked at that for 30 min and I went from wtf to I want that:)

    That's 70s quartz for you, it draws you in.

    Wibbs, what year is the Girard-Perregaux you posted.


  • #2


    njburke wrote: »
    Wibbs, what year is the Girard-Perregaux you posted.
    That one is from 73 NJ, as is this one, a similar model but with the blue dial and bracelet.

    attachment.php?attachmentid=556104&stc=1&d=1623910642

    They used to be easy enough to find and you'd have a few on ebay for a couple of hundred quid. These days they rarely seem to come up and are much pricier when they do. That blue one came from France originally, the other linen dial one from Argentina. That particular model was rare enough, maybe one out of six of the examples of that quartz series showing up. The rarest of all being the one with the "Tron" Motorola chip dial(fewer than a dozen known including GP's own museum example). I was looking for years before I finally sourced one of them.

    They're an interesting design and story. The first Swiss quartz with a stepping motor and one of a far superior design to even the best of the best today for Seiko and the like. For a start they could drive normal sized hands back in the early 70's(mechanical movements have far more torque). Compare that handset to the Omega's. They're weedy and sticklike by comparison. First to use the 32Khz quartz frequency which 99% of quartz movements have used since. They did away with jewels and used teflon bearings, far more efficient but people like the idea of "jewels", even though they're cheaper, so that died a death. They also designed the movement for ease of maintenance for old style watchmakers who often struggled to deal with the "new" quartz. Unlike many if not most quartz today they and the Omega hit the seconds markers on the money. Then again these were not cheap watches. The Omega Seamaster "Mariner" above was over a half more expensive than a Speedy. The GP was considered good value for a quartz but was just over the price of a Rolex Sub. Then again Rolex were significantly cheaper and more mid range than today.

    They were a good earner for GP, as was quartz for the Swiss industry in general. It was the rise and rise in popularity of digitals that killed the Swiss, not quartz itself. There wasn;t a "Quartz Crisis" much more a digital one. Though their marketing today would rarely if ever mention it, the Swiss had innovated and invested heavily in quartz, but missed the digital thing almost completely until it was too late. Then the cheap digitals from Japan and Hong Kong nailed that coffin shut.

    It can be hard to understand now since the Swiss mechanical revival and because the Future(tm) and Modernism is far less a thing, but by 1980 it was the equivalent of why would anybody want a steam engine that ran on coal that cost a lot to run and maintain and was slower, when you could have an autonomous Tesla that did 0-60 in OHMYGOD! with flat panels and carplay and fart noises that ran on pennies to the mile? And the Swiss were for the most part were still selling overpriced steam engines, or Teslas that were five years behind the curve. You really couldn't have predicted the future.

    Few enough were innocent in the past, few enough are innocent in the present, we just don’t know why yet.



  • #2


    The coolest watch on here is a quartz! Love that watch, one of those crazy designs that just works brilliantly


  • #2


    After the Swiss conglomerate Beta 21, Longines Ultraquartz(who were a blonde one away from beating Seiko to market and actually had product to sell) and GP with their 350 series that set standards kicked things off Omega were the innovators in design and in a lot of ways the engineering in 70's quartz. They blew pretty much everyone else out of the water on that score. Even in the tiny details. That Omega Seamaster above has a teeny little dot on the movement with the Omega logo to show it's authentic and it's a hologram. In the early 70's.

    Few enough were innocent in the past, few enough are innocent in the present, we just don’t know why yet.



  • #2


    Wibbs , again you are a mine of information and detail. One of the things I like about watch collecting is the depth of detail that one can dive into. What rings my bell about the two watches, is the cutting edge technology, the styling and the craftsmanship.

    As an aside, I was looking at my '73 seiko advan and was wondering what was going on in Japanese culture that produced such radical designs. So I did a bit of reading about what was going on in Japan in the early 70s, partly triggered by a track on the lost in translation soundtrack by a 70s folk rock band called Happy End.
    A very interesting period, a world fair, an attempted coup and a couple of WW2 imperial army soldiers still at war in the Philippines.

    To illustrate your point on second hand not hitting the marks, I attach my example below, purchased on a tip from the bargains thread. It's alignment defect I feel is more than compensated for by the orangeness of the minute hand.

    attachment.php?attachmentid=556083&stc=1&d=1623882960


  • #2


    I looked at that for 30 min and I went from wtf to I want that:)

    Get in line! ;):D
    Love the " Mariner" as mentioned before by Wibbs, it was nicknamed due to it being tested in extreme conditions by strapping it to the mast of a boat during the OSTAR in June 1976

    YOBvY4f.jpg

    DGONyt0.jpg

    Here is french sailor Eric Tabarly ,winner of the OSTAR in 1976 wearing another special quartz Omega,one of Wibbs favourites, the Marine Chronometer

    7g0W5x5.jpg


  • #2


    They strapped a second one to the keel underwater too and after the voyage the two watches were running to the second of each other. Interestingly they have a snap on rather than screw caseback, but clearly it seals well enough. I bloody love the Marine Chronometer. I've nearly pulled the trigger a few times in the past. It's not the purchase price so much, though it would break my usual couple of hundred quid rule, but the Omega servicing costs when it would require that and they seem to require that often enough. Eric Tabarly also wore an electronic Lip Nautic-Ski so I have that base covered. :D

    Few enough were innocent in the past, few enough are innocent in the present, we just don’t know why yet.



  • #2


    The newly acquired Sinn arrived this morning :D
    I am bloody delighted with it, the postman knocked on the door an hour ago and after a quick adjustment of the bracelet it's been on wrist since!

    00000-IMG-00000-BURST20210617084327243-COVER.jpg


  • #2


    New Tissot PRX.



    The PRX is interesting.. i see they do a waffle dial version of it with 80 hours power reserve... TGV did a piece on his channel about it.. seems like it would suit 7 inch wrists and bigger due to lug design...


  • #2


    banie01 wrote: »
    The newly acquired Sinn arrived this morning :D
    I am bloody delighted with it, the postman knocked on the door an hour ago and after a quick adjustment of the bracelet it's been on wrist since!

    very nice Banie!


  • #2


    banie01 wrote: »
    The newly acquired Sinn arrived this morning :D

    What’s the little circle at 6 o’clock? Is it a cutout or is it just a lume dot?


  • #2


    mailforkev wrote: »
    What’s the little circle at 6 o’clock? Is it a cutout or is it just a lume dot?

    It's a viewer for the copper sulphate capsule.
    It's part of Sinn's stay dry AR technology.
    When/if it goes blue the watch has a moisture issue.


  • #2


    Wibbs wrote: »
    Seamaster Quartz

    A real beauty Wibbs. You've got to adjust the screws to parallel with the outer case though, my OCD levels are going through the roof!


  • #2


    VW 1 wrote: »
    A real beauty Wibbs. You've got to adjust the screws to parallel with the outer case though, my OCD levels are going through the roof!

    On a very quiet day, I actually googled this before! https://blog.crownandcaliber.com/understanding-screw-alignment-in-watches/


  • #2


    Very interesting. Never would have occurred to me that they weren't misaligned screws!


  • #2


    I always assumed the screws on an AP Royal Oak were aligned at the front, they were aligned to the hexagonal shape of the case and were screwed in proper from the rear of the case back? That blog post seems to point to the inverse :confused:


  • #2


    That blog post seems to infer that my perfectly aligned B&R could potentially be worth a fortune :eek:
    Particularly if hodinkee ever do a "screws are straight" blog...
    And I sold it back to the lad I bought it off at a wash!

    Dammit!! :pac:


  • #2


    Yeah the screws are somewhat functional rather than purely decorative so don't line up. If I did tweak them they'd fall out. :D Still they didn't need to be there from a functional standpoint. The whole screws in the front of the case was big in the 70's and has come back again now the 70's became fashionable again over the last ten years. I can't think of any watches before the very late 60's with visible screws in the front. Screws holding the case from the back were around alright. Though he didn't start the bulky steel with heavy bracelet trend in higher end watches trend Genta singlehandedly kicked that industrial vibe off with the Royal Oak and many brands copied that.

    Few enough were innocent in the past, few enough are innocent in the present, we just don’t know why yet.



  • #2


    Staying in the land of flares and velour again today. More futuristics from 1972.

    attachment.php?attachmentid=556128&stc=1&d=1623926039
    banie01 wrote: »
    It's a viewer for the copper sulphate capsule.
    It's part of Sinn's stay dry AR technology.
    When/if it goes blue the watch has a moisture issue.
    Which Blancpain started back in the 60's with their Fifty Fathoms tweaked for the US military where they added a humidity detector.

    tornek-rayville.jpeg

    NOT my watch. Sadly. The circle above the 6 position was bisected in half and so long as the colour matched it was dry, if the top half got darker there was moisture present. Simple but clever little idea.

    I bloody love that Sinn B :)

    Few enough were innocent in the past, few enough are innocent in the present, we just don’t know why yet.



  • #2


    Wibbs wrote: »



    I bloody love that Sinn B :)

    Thanks Wibbs :)
    I am giggling like Homer in a donut shop everytime I look at it!

    Just knowing it's 69/150 really has awakened my inner teenager, alá Beavis and Butthead :pac:


  • #2


    @Wibbs I love the fact that you collect in such an interesting way for the history and merit of each piece, not just a brand or a type.

    You should document your collection and put it under a thread here of curios, oddballs and general interest pieces.

    There's a book in it, I know an editor :)


  • #2


    @wibbs, Ah, the ultronic, splendid provenance and the orange minute hand.

    On the internal moisture indicator, is that not just a bit too late? Is it a ' hello user,you've left the crown out and then gone for a swim' indicator. I suppose the sooner you get it stripped and serviced the better.

    From an engineering perspective how difficult is it seal a watch for submersion? Cousteau and Gagnan came up with the aqualung in '43 and scuba kicked off in the Fifties. Dive watches followed as the sport took off and the equipment developed to extend dive duration and depth. The watch being used for risk management meant it was pretty important that it stayed functioning whilst underwater. A canteen crown is a good start, sealing a pressfit crystal probably a bit more challenging.


  • #2


    On the Waterford Greenway last Saturday with my Brompton and Casio Wave Ceptor.

    attachment.php?attachmentid=556161&stc=1&d=1623944833


  • #2


    I actually went and had a look at Brompton bikes, as I was curious about that strange looking yoke you were riding.


Sign In or Register to comment.