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Whats your surname in irish?

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  • Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 42,362 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Beruthiel


    Originally posted by Gael
    Ó hAirt, I think, which would mean descendant of Art, which is just an Irish Christian name, which is sometimes given as an Irish form of Arthur.

    thanks gael :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,459 ✭✭✭✭ Stark


    Ó' Riordáin - O'Riordan - apparently means "royal bard"


  • Registered Users Posts: 68,319 ✭✭✭✭ seamus


    Heh, very interesting.

    "Ó Dálaigh" meaning "One who is present at assemblies" or possibly referring to being the master of ceremonies at events

    Apparently I'm a direct descendent of the Irish root of the clan, who first arrived in Cork, where my grandparents are from :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,529 ✭✭✭ zynaps


    Weird how you can sometimes spot irish words still used today in old family names...

    Ó Ríordáin - dán (poem) rí? (king)
    Ó Dálaigh - dáil (assembly)


  • Registered Users Posts: 77,681 ✭✭✭✭ Victor


    Originally posted by zynaps
    It might be nice to actually know where the name comes from, but there ye go... modern society and apathy and all ;)
    Hmmm, I have a certain resonnance with this. My surname is Moore, I don't think it's right to have an "Irish version", this is what is on my birth cert and this is how is should stay, I dislike the way certain revisionist Gaelgóirs decide to rename children / people without their permission.

    I don't know if my ancestors (from West Cork) were immigrant (English) "Moore"s in the 19th century or in some previous era or if they were migrant Offaly ("O'Mordhá"s).


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,560 ✭✭✭ uberwolf


    i have to deal with the exact opposite, people anglising my name, its wrong both ways, if you renamed some coloured guy for your own amusement and told them that was their name from now on there'd be war.

    Less you change it its as your birth cert says


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,055 ✭✭✭ snickerpuss


    Well my surname in irish is de léis. Rather boring. And it means....ummmmm...nothing cos its french. Well it means "of lacey". Hmmm im off to france to trace my roots ....
    ah bhuel sin a bhfuil


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 16 Darragh2


    Ó Bradáin = Sammon

    Don't ask where that originated from, I haven't a clue. There's a lot of confusion as there isn't any one clear answer to where this surname comes from.

    Maybe from the legendary Bradán Feasa. I wish.


  • Registered Users Posts: 852 ✭✭✭ DannyD


    Donal O Duinnin is the name on my new passport.My old name was Danny Dinneen.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,286 ✭✭✭ Gael


    Maith thú a Dhónail. An bhfuil do shloinne Gaelach agat ar rudaí eile, ****as bainc, ceadúnas tiomána, cartaí aitheantais srl?

    Well done Donal. Do you use your Irish name on other things like your bank account, driver's licence, ID cards etc?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,286 ✭✭✭ Gael


    Aw I don't believe it! They've censored the Irish word "c*ntas"(account) because it contains the English swearword "c*nt". Isn't that going a bit far people! It's a different language and there was no intention to swear or be vulgar. Bard?????


  • Registered Users Posts: 852 ✭✭✭ DannyD


    Nope, just the passport so far.I am using my address in Irish but I fear it will take longer to get delivered as I saw a translation writen on the envelope I received :( What happens at the sorting office if the sorter doesn't speak Gaelige ?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10 Dellboi


    Ó Murchú/Murchadha is é mo shloinne.
    means descendant of Murchadh, which i think means sea warrior.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,298 ✭✭✭✭ Bard


    Originally posted by Gael
    Aw I don't believe it! They've censored the Irish word "c*ntas"(account) because it contains the English swearword "c*nt". Isn't that going a bit far people! It's a different language and there was no intention to swear or be vulgar. Bard?????

    Cúntas?

    works fine for me


    (it does have a fada, doesn't it? :) )


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,529 ✭✭✭ zynaps


    Cunt + as = cuntas....
    But yeah, cúntas is right as far as I know....
    Why is it that you hear people pronounce it without the fada though? Maybe I've just been hearing too many donegal heads in cluastrialacha, plus our accounts teacher back in transition year in school was from somewhere up north.

    I've certainly always pronounced it with a fada, and it's obviously easier to type it that way here, so... :)

    zynaps


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,965 ✭✭✭ Dun


    No fada on c u n t a s. I've always pronounced it as if it had one as well, though.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,204 ✭✭✭ bug


    ni hAirtnéada

    I dunno what it means, but the family crest is nice. Aparently originally from the Cork Kerry border.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,708 ✭✭✭ Praetorian


    Ó Cathaláin - I love the Irish version of my name


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 69 ✭✭ thesage


    Ó Donnchadha - Descendant of Donnchadh, which apparently means brown warrior or chieftain, though I'd love it if someone could explain how warrior(gaiscíoch, óglaigh, laoch) or chieftain (taoiseach) is derived from "chadh". Is it sean-gaeilge nó mean-gaeilge? Any takers?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,618 ✭✭✭ Grudaire


    Hellrazer wrote:
    risteard ni siulamhain(spelling!!!!!)

    Meaning one eye.I think or have been told for years.

    Ó' Súilleabháin

    Ní is for the womenfolk.

    It's my name too, and I was alway's told that "one eye" is a mistranslation, and the correct meaning is dark eye....


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 69 ✭✭ thesage


    When you think about it that would make far more sense...
    To be of high standing in Gaelic Warrior Society, as in to be elected Taoiseach or Rí, you couldn't be "deformed or disfigured" in anyway. In fact blinding of one's rivals was a common way to secure one's victory in a clan "election".
    Anyway, a whole dynasty, especially one as large and powerful as Ó Suilleabháin would hardly have been named after a "disfigured" one-eyed chap.


  • Registered Users Posts: 77,681 ✭✭✭✭ Victor


    thesage wrote:
    Anyway, a whole dynasty, especially one as large and powerful as Ó Suilleabháin would hardly have been named after a "disfigured" one-eyed chap.
    Maybe it was the collection of all the opponents? :D


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 687 ✭✭✭ kano476


    O Cathain


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6 IrishKing


    Hi, Im knew here, my family names are Maney and Martin from Ireland. I know Martin is a very common name in Ireland so the one Im really interested in is Maney. I see it maybe have been O Maonaigh but a lady in Ireland said it was probably O Mahoney? Any help on this would be great thank you very much. Richard


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10,808 ✭✭✭✭ chin_grin


    Mag Uiginn


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 20,759 ✭✭✭✭ dlofnep


    IrishKing wrote: »
    Hi, Im knew here, my family names are Maney and Martin from Ireland. I know Martin is a very common name in Ireland so the one Im really interested in is Maney. I see it maybe have been O Maonaigh but a lady in Ireland said it was probably O Mahoney? Any help on this would be great thank you very much. Richard

    I've never heard of the name Maney in Ireland, and from a quick google - It appears it may be derived from France - Not Ireland.

    Another google stated it is derived from Irish: "Ó Maine" - And I've never heard that either used in Ireland.

    So take your pic. If you want to try Irish'ise your name, go with "Ó Maine".. Or just make up your own name - like McManey. :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6 IrishKing


    dlofnep wrote: »
    I've never heard of the name Maney in Ireland, and from a quick google - It appears it may be derived from France - Not Ireland.

    Another google stated it is derived from Irish: "Ó Maine" - And I've never heard that either used in Ireland.

    So take your pic. If you want to try Irish'ise your name, go with "Ó Maine".. Or just make up your own name - like McManey. :)
    Yes Maney is Irish,there lots of Maney's from Ireland,many came in the mid to late 17 hundreds and many, many came in the great famine and lots of them fought in the civil war here in America on both sides. Im trying to find out the origin of the name,if it be O Maine like ancestry.com says or another Irish site says it is from O Maonaigh. Some who live in Ireland say it came from O Mahoney in County Waterford but I guess it could have come from a few places,,I have a book about my Maney ancestor. He arrived in 1769 from Ireland and I have court documents in which he states he was born in Ireland and of Irish descent. But thanks for the help.


  • Moderators, Education Moderators Posts: 21,730 Mod ✭✭✭✭ entropi


    Would love to post my name as gaelige but don't know what it is :( if anyone can post what the Irish version of Bowes is, maybe i can find some stuff about it :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,851 ✭✭✭ PurpleFistMixer


    My surname is ní Aolaín. As far as I can remember from a project I did in TY about it, it comes from Waterford and is vaguely related to Phelan, and it means something about wolves.
    What a useful project that was. But really it's probably an English name as my grandfather is English.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 20,759 ✭✭✭✭ dlofnep


    You all come from dlofnep's homeland. My little children!

    Irishking, it may come from O'Mahoney/Ó Maonaigh or whatever.. But I doubt that Maney is an Irish name in itself - Most likely an anglecized version of an Irish name. I know a few O'Mahoney's in Waterford, so they may be derived from here.

    Anyways, back on topic - My surname is Ó Briain, or Ua Briain in even older Irish :P


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