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Bedroom window fire safety!

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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,920 ✭✭✭con747


    "Drama"? Well it's quite obvious if there was a fire in the hall outside that room in that apartment it would require smashing the window which is a fact.

    Don't expect anything from life, just be grateful to be alive.



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 38,598 Mod ✭✭✭✭Gumbo


    If there was a fire is many strategic places windows require smashing.

    It’s one of those “we can’t design for every individual circumstance” moments.

    But it’s also why protected entrance halls and common corridors are sterile environments with very little if any fire load.



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,920 ✭✭✭con747


    That is why the OP started this thread because the window was changed. "Long story short the window used to open inwards they decided to change it a few years ago but iv been fighting them as the window installed is now a fixed window with no opening!" I doubt a child would have the know how to break a double glazed window in a worst case scenario.

    Don't expect anything from life, just be grateful to be alive.



  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 38,598 Mod ✭✭✭✭Gumbo




  • Registered Users Posts: 5,920 ✭✭✭con747


    OK, I think I will leave this here and let the child in the room make that decision while the building burns down.

    Don't expect anything from life, just be grateful to be alive.



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  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 38,598 Mod ✭✭✭✭Gumbo


    Breaking the window acts like a vent. Could be more trouble by adding air to the environment.

    Not sure what they’d smash a window with too, it’s not the movies, panes of glass will slice right through the child climbing out.

    The same scenario is presented to every single apartment over 3 stories high in the country.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,533 ✭✭✭BlackEdelweiss


    I was referring to the type of restrictors installed by a building owner for security purposes after installation.

    Post edited by BlackEdelweiss on


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,533 ✭✭✭BlackEdelweiss


    When I was 23 I was locked out of my house one night when I was quite drunk. I had the bright idea to smash one of the double glazed windows in the house. It took me about 4 or 5 swings with a garden rake to break the window. There was an explosion of glass both inwards and outwards. The window was not suitable for climbing through.

    Believe me, a young girl is not going to smash through a double glazed window.

    If you knew anything about this topic you would know that escape windows are not for smashing, they are for climbing out.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,533 ✭✭✭BlackEdelweiss


    Look back through my posts. I have provided you with fire safety advice that could potentially save you and your family. The responsibility for the safety of your family lies with you. You requested advice and you have received advice from a number of people who work in the field of fire safety, I can tell this because of the wording and technical advice they are providing you with.

    I presume you are not a fire safety professional as you are disregarding the professional advice provided here and instead looking to make a big deal out of the window situation.

    My fire safety guidance below:

    • Check your smoke detectors regularly - smoke detectors = early warning, early warning means a better chance of survival.
    • Keep your escape route clear of obstructions when you go to bed at night, you dont want people tripping or have something catch fire in your hallway.
    • Close all doors at night before you go to bed, this will keep the smoke and fire in the room of fire origin and will hopefully provide you and your family with time to recognise that the fire alarm is beeping and to get out of the building.
    • Make sure all your electrical cables are sound. Do not repair damaged cables, throw them out immediately. My wife bought an expensive electric blanket about 10 months ago. Last week she showed me the cable on my side of the blanket, it was chipped and split. I dont know how. The rest of the cable was spotless. The full thing had to go straight in the bin. If she was not rummaging behind the bed it would have gone unnoticed and was a serious fire hazard.
    • Draw up a fire response plan. When the alarm goes, everyone should know exactly what to do. No wandering around sleepy eyed, everyone gets up and gets out the door. Involve your daughter and let her know what to do in the event of a fire alarm activation. Dont go looking for toys, dont go hiding somewhere, come straight to mammy and daddys room and wake them up if they are still asleep.

    Fire safety is your responsibility, dont put your trust in a builder supposedly doing his job right 15 years ago. I inspect a lot of buildings and see a lot of **** work. Trust me, take care of yourself and your family. Dont rely on anything or anyone else.



  • Registered Users Posts: 39,119 ✭✭✭✭Mellor


    Restrictors for security purposes? How would that work? Regardless previous poster was pretty clear on the function when he said;

    You says that was not allowed. Even doubled down in a follow up when @sydthebeat quoted the regs. It was wrong, they are allowed. No need to dwell on it.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,533 ✭✭✭BlackEdelweiss


    The conversation was over until you brought it up again.

    I dont think I doubled down on anything. I saw syds comment and replied. The image he showed backed up where I was coming from, post installation restrictors. I was not arguing any point. His point was also backed up. We were both coming from different view points.

    I have seen window restrictor devices added to windows in mental health premises where there is a risk of the resident either falling or jumping from an openable window. They had installed restrictor devices on the windows that were openable by a key.

    HSE Information Sheet No 5 - Falls from windows or balconies in health and social care states the following:

    I admit my original comment was not 100% accurate but it was not fully wrong either. Not sure why it has got your back up so much.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,533 ✭✭✭BlackEdelweiss


    This is the product they had used and this is what I thought the poster was referring to. Apologies if it upset you so much.




  • Registered Users Posts: 39,119 ✭✭✭✭Mellor


    That’s a very long winded way of acknowledging you were wrong.

    The HSE guidelines applied to HSE situations. It in no way implies that is the only situation where they can be used.

    I admit my original comment was not 100% accurate but it was not fully wrong either. Not sure why it has got your back up so much.

    It hasn’t got my back up at all. I’m pointing out that misinformation so nobody is mislead by it. The forum is a resource for others.

    And let’s be clear, what you say was fully wrong. Restrictors are allowed. You explained how you got mixed up, doesn’t make it less wrong though



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,533 ✭✭✭BlackEdelweiss


    You asked how window restrictors would work for security purposes. I was just explaining the situation where I had encountered this.

    I'm not sure where you are going with all this, seems like a bit of an attack where I am not trying to force anything on anyone. I admitted I had got the wrong end of the stick and just clarified where I was coming from. At no point after my first comment did I say restrictors were not allowed. The issue was addressed about 2 weeks ago, not sure why you felt the cavalry was required to come in again and sort me out.

    Well done on being right!



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,920 ✭✭✭con747


    I think the whole point of the thread the OP started was the fact the window does not open! Maybe read the opening post before telling me what I know about. The fact you were pissed when you had you're light bulb moment is hardly relevant apart from the fact it's probably why you took so long to break it. I think I'll leave you all to it here.

    Don't expect anything from life, just be grateful to be alive.



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,881 ✭✭✭Rows Grower


    I looked back through your posts and what I see is an incorrect opinion contradicting correct information and after that an abundance of waffle masquerading as professional advice.

    You were wrong, stop digging a deeper hole. Just admit you were wrong, apologise and move on with the rest of your life.

    "Very soon we are going to Mars. You wouldn't have been going to Mars if my opponent won, that I can tell you. You wouldn't even be thinking about it."

    Donald Trump, March 13th 2018.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,533 ✭✭✭BlackEdelweiss


    I admitted I was wrong. I was thinking about a different type of restrictor. I have no bother admitting when I am wrong.

    My comments about restrictors not being allowed is still correct, it was just not relevant to this thread. I was talking about a different type of restrictor device that is not allowed and is stated as such in the snip of the tgd that was used to prove me wrong.

    My abundance of waffle is actually sound fire safety advice. The op would be better placed implimenting that advice than worrying about escape windows.

    I left this discussion 2 weeks ago, I'm just not sure why it's being dragged up again.



  • Registered Users Posts: 7,881 ✭✭✭Rows Grower


    You said "I admit my original comment was not 100% accurate but it was not fully wrong either". To me, they are the words of someone who has some kind of bother admitting they were wrong.

    Your insistence that "my comments about restrictors not being allowed is still correct" is totally wrong.

    It was wrong two weeks ago and it was wrong yesterday.

    "Very soon we are going to Mars. You wouldn't have been going to Mars if my opponent won, that I can tell you. You wouldn't even be thinking about it."

    Donald Trump, March 13th 2018.



  • Registered Users Posts: 39,119 ✭✭✭✭Mellor


    You half admitted you were wrong in a irrelevant post about the HSE. Then you added a "but it was not fully wrong either" and now "My comments about restrictors not being allowed is still correct".

    It's was not correct. Simple as. The reason it's still dragged up is because you keep insisting it was correct despite you also being wrong. All you had to say was "sorry, I got mixed up with a different window lock".



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,533 ✭✭✭BlackEdelweiss


    My post about the HSE was in response to your comment about how a restrictor would be used for security purposes. I was showing you where I had come across this.

    I have admitted that I was incorrect about my comment on the use of restrictors, multiple times. My comments about not being 100% incorrect are down to the actual section of codes that are being used to bash me also contains the wording detailing the types of restrictor devices that are not allowed. So, while my comments were not accurate for the response to the original comment on restrictors (which I have admitted to), they are accurate for buildings in general. That is all I was saying.


    Why are you all fighting this so much? This is not even a thread about restrictor devices. And also, restrictor devices as recommended by the original poster are for windows 1400mm above ground which this window clearly is not.


    I am officially out of this thread now, post away all you want. The egos of boards rear their ugly heads as usual. Such a load of bull ****.





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  • Registered Users Posts: 39,119 ✭✭✭✭Mellor


    I have admitted that I was incorrect about my comment on the use of restrictors, multiple times. My comments about not being 100% incorrect are down to the actual section of codes that are being used to bash me also contains the wording detailing the types of restrictor devices that are not allowed. So, while my comments were not accurate for the response to the original comment on restrictors (which I have admitted to), they are accurate for buildings in general. That is all I was saying.

    The comment "restrictors are not allowed" is not accurate for buildings in general.

    Why are you all fighting this so much? This is not even a thread about restrictor devices

    I correct you because your post was incorrect, that's all. This is a place of information for others. If you left it there that would have been it, we all get mixed up occasionally.

    It's utterly hilarious that your accusing others of ego, when you're going on a rant and refusing to let the issue go because your were proven wrong. Even more hilarious that your posting under the guide of being a professional. The professional thing to do is acknowledge your mistake and move on.

    Not sure why you are posted that section from the TGD. @sydthebeat already highlight how it proves you were wrong.



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