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"Irish food and ingredients is world class / world leading / best in the word". According to who?

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  • Registered Users Posts: 16,838 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu




  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 48,763 CMod ✭✭✭✭magicbastarder


    some of it is from thailand, at least for the UK market, as of 2018. but not all, as timmyntc's comment would suggest.

    but it does put eusap's comment about irish chicken being used in mcdonalds across the EU under scrutiny, when ireland does not warrant mention in the short list on that link.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,740 ✭✭✭thomas 123


    This. ^^

    I think its mad that we are not way more into BBQ here given the amount of quality beef, pork, fish we produce.

    Take sausages - we do nothing with them at all. Its only recently the bigger ones from the UK are starting to get mainstream.

    Post edited by Boards.ie: Paul on


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,912 ✭✭✭timmyntc


    The lack of variety of sausages in ireland is shocking

    90% is bland breakfast sausages



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,113 ✭✭✭Ger Roe


    The Irish food production industry has always been a mystery to me.

    We have the best beef in the world... and yet farmers apparently can't make a crust from their efforts.

    We have practically no horticulture industry, beyond a concentration of fruit farms in north county Dublin - why don't we grow enough veg to feed ourselves, why are our fields slick green grass growing platforms for the production of methane from a world leading beef industry that apparently can't sustain the farmers that engage in it? You can drive the length and breath of the country and see practically no activity on the green baize that covers it

    We are an island nation and yet have one of the lowest levels of fish consumption in the world.

    Maybe the best of what we produce goes to export, but in the currently rapidly changing and increasingly insular world, I think we need to start looking after ourselves by making more things and growing/producing more food.

    Fifteen years ago, I spoke to a business man that had plans to grow rapeseed all over Wexford to supply a planned bio-diesel plant to put Ireland on the world map of environmental motoring ... it never came to pass. If it did, we might not be as reliant on the many rip off factors that are ripping us off at the moment.

    I don't get it .... I know there is some veg growing going on, and a bit of wheat, but not nearly enough to help us out on being less dependent on others and to reduce our carbon footprint through simpler (domestic) distribution.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 16,838 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    While I agree re the lack of variety, the Irish breakfast sausage is a classic amongst international sausages!

    It's just unfortunate that for many Irish people, it's the, "only sausage"!



  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 48,763 CMod ✭✭✭✭magicbastarder


    We have practically no horticulture industry, beyond a concentration of fruit farms in north county Dublin - why don't we grow enough veg to feed ourselves, why are our fields slick green grass growing platforms for the production of methane from a world leading beef industry that apparently can't sustain the farmers that engage in it?

    because we're good at growing grass. and the economic model worldwide is do what you can do best, and let other countries grow the stuff you're not so good at doing.

    i'm not saying this is a good thing.

    Fifteen years ago, I spoke to a business man that had plans to grow rapeseed all over Wexford to supply a planned bio-diesel plant to put Ireland on the world map of environmental motoring

    i'm saying this would not be a good thing.



  • Registered Users Posts: 6,912 ✭✭✭timmyntc


    the Irish breakfast sausage is a classic amongst international sausages!

    According to who?



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,740 ✭✭✭thomas 123


    This could have its own thread 😂


    What is the classic Irish breakfast sausage? Is it the musgrave sausage in every hotel and deli or is it the thin little one you have to incinerate to cook?



  • Registered Users Posts: 13,928 ✭✭✭✭Thelonious Monk


    According to Irish people! Germans, Polish, British etc. would all think their sausages are the best in the world.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 16,838 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    Me. 😜

    It's a great sausage style, when done well. I'm not claiming that it's the best sausage in the world, just that it belongs amongst the great sausage styles. It's flavour is quite particular.

    Post edited by the beer revolu on


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,838 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    Personally, I think the Tesco finest version is a good example of a good breakfast sausage.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,165 ✭✭✭Packrat


    Jesus Christ... on a thread about great food and they're disagreeing about which brand of mass produced crap is better.

    Tell us you know nothing about food without telling us you know nothing about food.

    “The Party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command”



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,494 ✭✭✭JackieChang




  • Registered Users Posts: 1,494 ✭✭✭JackieChang


    Exactly!

    The Irish sausage a classic amongst international sausages LOL. According to mammy is it.

    Our most "prized" sausage (by Irish people) , Clonakilty, is the biggest pile of shyte I've ever tasted. It's only 50% pork as well. The rest is feckin pigs eyelids and toenail clippings probably.

    For a well travelled bunch we seem so small village minded. Our diet is so plain and shyte of course people think food abroad is pure rubbish and Irish is the best. It's too much of a cultural shock to taste anything else. I know so many people who won't even eat vegetables. My cousin for years would only eat waffles. I don't know how he's still alive.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,394 ✭✭✭NSAman


    Ahhh now come on. THE breakfast sausage is no more. The Famed original Superquinn Sausage no longer exists.

    In relation to Irish food, whether it be for home preparation or commercial preparation, the quality is excellent!

    Try living where I am in the States. Cisco lorries pulling in each morning to dump todays load of frozen food into the "restaurants", no such thing here are local fresh foods being used. Walmart has so many preservatives in their food that it literally takes metalic.

    There is nothing like going home to have a meal which contains locally sourced produce where you know meat has not been passed through bleach, or doesnt contain so much water and salt that the cow if alive now would be in brine!

    Don't knock Irish food. It's good! Like most European Countries, Ireland has specialties and by GOD the beef is superb!



  • Registered Users Posts: 16,838 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    Folks, my only real claim is that the breakfast sausage as a style has its place amongst international sausage styles. Done well, it has a particular flavour profile and texture that is well loved by visitors as well as those brought up on them. You won't find me claiming any best in the world nonsense. It was an aside ffs! It is, by design, a cheap, everyday product.

    A **** quality sausage is a **** sausage, irrespective of style!

    And to one, particular poster 🖕



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,165 ✭✭✭Packrat


    The only brand of mass produced sausages I know is shyte, my cousin only eats waffles, I also know that many other children like me don't like green veg = Irish food is shyte.

    You're some tulip alright.

    So tell us oh wise one - of the culinary delights you've sampled across the globe, where is the food sooooooo much better than the Irish examples of the same product.

    I and several others have given you numerous examples of where SOME of our food is world class. I'll give you another: on sausages seeing as it's your favorite subject: Dermot Brennam of the Brook Lane Hotel raises his own pigs here and has won international awards in France for the last 7 years straight including best breakfast sausage and best overall pork product.

    You're getting your ass handed to you on this thread and you're still trying to argue a point with no examples to prove your case.

    This strongly implies you're a troll.

    “The Party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command”



  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 11,207 Mod ✭✭✭✭igCorcaigh


    A good Irish breakfast sausage is a classic thing; smooth texture with subtle flavours of white pepper and nutmeg (and salt!). Obviously a very different style from the courser, gamier sausage found in some other European countries. But should that category cover British sausages too? I think it would.

    I could not eat an Irish or English breakfast with kielbasa!



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,616 ✭✭✭El Tarangu


    I remember being surprised at seeing Kerrygold butter in a supermarket in the United States when I was over there - and was then less surprised to see it in every subsequent country I have lived in (a couple of Northern European ones). I have also seen 'Irish beef' very prominently advertised as such abroad (in a way that you don't really see for Danish pork or Dutch eggs or whatever).

    Irish butter butter certainly tastes very nice, though I would probably put that down mostly to the salt content. Isn't there something that Irish butter has a more yellowish colour than it's competitors as a result of being fed grass year-round? (though maybe I have inadvertently fallen victim to Bord Fáilte's wiles).

    Anyway, we were never shy as a nation about listing off things we thought we were best at, anyway.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,494 ✭✭✭JackieChang


    "So tell us oh wise one - of the culinary delights you've sampled across the globe, where is the food sooooooo much better than the Irish examples of the same product."

    I haven't tasted all food around the globe. That's why I would never claim that Irish food is best food, that would be totally ignorant.

    Unless the UN proclaimed it and everybody at the UN voted in favour of the motion.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,165 ✭✭✭Packrat


    The UN? Are you 8? Wtf do they have to do with food?

    Have you tasted ANY of the food around the globe then?

    Or are you just a troll who has no clue about food in general?

    “The Party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command”



  • Registered Users Posts: 18 Malbac




  • Registered Users Posts: 18 Malbac




  • Registered Users Posts: 16,838 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    I think it's mace is the distinctive, yet subtle spice, rather than nutmeg (same plant).



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,494 ✭✭✭JackieChang


    I've had food in Europe, South America and Africa. So three continents. Four continensts if you include a sandwich in Abu Dhabi airport.

    Tastiest beef I've had was in Brazil. (Doesn't mean it's the best in the world). Second tastiest was Kenya. The only two countries where I basically stood in shock and wide eyed while eating beef and said "oh **** that is some good shyt". Only flavor on both occasions: salt. Not drenched in butter and rosemary and garlic and pepper.

    Veggies are much more delicious in Europe. Especially tomatoes. Is that a fruit. Who knows. The tomatoes here just taste like crunchy water. Anyway all our veggies here are imported. Check the country of origin on everything in the shops.

    Regarding our "world class" Auschwitz farmed pork. Couldn't tell the difference eating pork abroad. Ate many pork BBQs overseas at the side of the road that were definitely nicer than the watery pork chops we have here.

    For the person who said our wheat is the best, eh? Like raw wheat, just eat a spoon of it? Or do you mean bread? You can't beat a bit of bread in France. Even the cheapest restaurants give you some free bread to nibble on that is miles above the standard you get here.

    French butter is yummy too of course.

    I've had the most delicious seafood along the Mediterranean coast. Better than the bland and soggy "fillet of hake on a lump of mashed spud" you get everywhere here.

    "Irish fruit is world class" well let me tell you when you travel in any sort of hot or tropical country and try the fruit you'll forever be depressed when you're back in Ireland. I don't know how tropical people survive here. The fruit here is like eating raw acid. Yes we have strawberries and they're yummy.

    I'm not a food expert, all I'm saying is I've basically left North Korea and had a taste of food overseas and realized that hey... Our food isn't the best in the world, or even world class. I don't know if any country can claim the best food in the world but tasting food in different countries has dislodged my big Irish head from my arse.

    I still haven't been to Asia or the middle east. But when i do go, don't worry I'll be comparing the cuisine there to our cabbage and spuds. I'll report back.

    I haven't been to Turkey yet but i do want to try out some lamb dishes there. Anybody been? How does the lamb there compare to ours?



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,494 ✭✭✭JackieChang


    Not research at all but Pitmaster YouTube channel, super pro beef master expert, tried American grain fed vs Irish grass fed and the American stuff won due to a beefier taste. The video is on YouTube somewhere. He basically said buy Irish beef if you're poor because it's cheaper but grain fed is a clear winner for taste.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,082 ✭✭✭Stephen_Maturin


    Echoing many on the thread but I do think it’s fair enough to regard our butter as amongst the best in the world.

    Years ago I was walking along an unpaved road on the outskirts of Lilongwe, Malawi - came around a bend and there at the crossroads was a big billboard for Kerrygold butter. Was totally surreal.

    On another note one point of difference I’ve noticed is our eggs here are much nicer than in many areas of continental Europe, particularly Iberia and the Mediterranean. Not sure if it’s the greater heat there or what but their eggs aren’t nearly as nice.



  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 48,763 CMod ✭✭✭✭magicbastarder


    That anecdote certainly shows we've some of the best butter marketing in the world, anyway.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 221 ✭✭put_the_kettle_on


    Come and ask me again in 6 months. I've managed to source everything I need to make cheddar from the uk ( it wasn't available here ) but brexit is making life difficult. The supplier is coming back to me today with a quote from a courier. I've found a grass fed raw milk supply locally so I'm hoping we get something really tasty as an end product. I'll just have to be patient while it matures.



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