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Angus Bull for Suckler Herd

2

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,271 ✭✭✭ Jjameson


    This has been said to me numerous times and I have answered it numerous times. This conversation has been over and over(well ploughed ground). I honestly couldn’t give a fig now what a floggers of a dead horse systems do with their time. (But it does bother me that the relentless pursuit of coupled payments for the farce will inevitably continue add to the processors billions€)



  • Registered Users Posts: 85 ✭✭ Neo Sanders


    😂😂😂 Unfortunately the options on marginal land are limited. Dairy beef is even worse, especially when meal is so expensive.

    As one fella said forestry is the way forward, but I don't want to be living in darkness



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,271 ✭✭✭ Jjameson


    The macamore region of county Wexford isn’t the golden vale and I seen a neighbour selling herX and Angus’s reared from calves that won’t be 24months until feb at €1200+. I also seen another man with Charolais suckler bred cattle ( some not within 100kg at the same age) getting similar money even though they had full time mothers. And the man isn’t lazy, he isn’t a bad farmer. The dairy cross cattle aren’t overpriced. He’s just flogging a dead horse!



  • Registered Users Posts: 10,219 ✭✭✭✭ Base price


    I presume that you know and understand that beef processors have also been recipients of coupled payments.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,949 ✭✭✭ squinn2912


    So are you for getting rid of your sucklers?

    Cattle are a good trade at the moment but if they were to take a dip my concern would be that the poorer quality dairy cross wouldn’t hold their value.

    The last animals here we sold were a group of heifers and they averaged £2.38 for 617kgs at £1477 so if I convert to Euro to measure like for like then thats about €1,715. They were around 18 months so that’s about 40p x 300 days so they’ve cost another £120-150 to feed means they’re still leaving about £650 or so behind them and I’ve also deducted the £20/head the mart take which would be equal for the dairy cross. I still think we’re getting out at that.



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,605 ✭✭✭ Grueller


    I am letting them go squinn. I just can't carry the workload with all of the batches. Sounds mad I know but at times suckling has created up to 6 batches of cattle here. Autumn calved bulls, autumn calved heifers, spring calved cows, dry cows, replacement heifers, stock bulls not in use. That is without anything in sick bay. Its just too much while working part time off farm also and milking as well.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,271 ✭✭✭ Jjameson


    March 2020 birthday cattle from your neck of woods.




  • Registered Users Posts: 3,949 ✭✭✭ squinn2912


    I think we all overed the amount of batches on another thread and yea it does add up with sucklers but you’d have a fair few with dairy stock too. I’d forgotten that you milk as well. That means you have a supply of dairy cross calves as it is and you know all about them including the start they’re getting etc. I think you’d need to be doing one or the other especially if you work out too you’d have an awful lot on your plate.



  • Registered Users Posts: 849 ✭✭✭ Easten


    I sold a batch of 10 Suckler bred heifers between 9 and 11 months old last week. Highest price 910, lowest 845 Lim X and Charolais X off 4 nd 5 star cows. Not bad stock, averaging around 330kg no meal given to them. Hardly setting the world on fire and if I took your costing of €760 that leaves an average margin of about €115. I'd need 350 of them to make the average Industrial wage!!!!



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  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 12,249 Mod ✭✭✭✭ blue5000


    Don't forget to add on all the money from the various schemes we have to go through to actually make money out of sucklers. Genomics, beep, beam, LFA, hen harriers, glas. You wouldn't get too many of these in forestry. I've probably forgotten a couple.

    If the seat's wet, sit on yer hat, a cool head is better than a wet ar5e.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,949 ✭✭✭ squinn2912




  • Registered Users Posts: 849 ✭✭✭ Easten


    That is the question.

    Getting 800-900 for Weanlens was just about ok up to about 2 years ago. Today it's just not cutting it.

    I must add that on the mart day mine were at the top end of the price range. There was several pens of Heifers sold below this. I seen 250kg heifers struggling to make 640

    Genomics + Beep is worth about 180/cow to me, I know figures might be better or worse for some. The rest of the payments I'd get if I only kept a few donkeys or was in Forestry.

    I was expecting far better prices this year, we should have seen price rises of at least 20% to be at a stand still.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,949 ✭✭✭ squinn2912


    No that’s no use. If you’re going for the weanlin market then in my opinion you need a heavier early calf. 250kgs is no use even if they sell well. Without even looking at costs €640 or even £640 wouldn’t look at keeping a cow and giving you anything back. I can’t mind who but someone was on here last year arguing the merit of calving in December so that he would have that strong weanling, I thought it too early but I don’t sell weanlings it doesnt suit me. Unless a really flashy one straight off the cow would make as much as a weanling as he would nearly 6 months later. Weanlings in our local mart were making £1050 to £1150 for quality ones 350-400 kgs, that would be meeting you. That’s top end though tbf

    Me and my da will need to really sit down and figure out numbers for autumn compared to spring calving and see what makes more sense. For our ground vs shed capacity we’re maxed though so that’s why it’s likely to remain spring autumn split and it means animals to sell for cash flow for larger portions of the year which is an advantage too.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,361 ✭✭✭ Hard Knocks


    Other years the 300-350kg calf was top price, this year it was the 400kg+ calf is it due to the Italian trade?

    September is a better month to sell



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,271 ✭✭✭ Jjameson


    In terms of grass management and the ability to group cattle there’s no comparison. A calf to beef system requires 3 groups. Only 2 if doing heifers.



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,361 ✭✭✭ Hard Knocks


    That’s good weights, you’re a top operator

    Lost a calf in Spring and fostered a BBX heifer, went back a few weeks later and bought 3 FR bulls, weighted all a few weeks ago heifer 300kg, bulls 230kg, a June born suckler CH calf @ 330kg, bulls are getting 4kg daily between the 3, nothing else getting nuts



  • Registered Users Posts: 816 ✭✭✭ minerleague


    If every suckler farmer stops there wont be much out of drystock either



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,271 ✭✭✭ Jjameson


    Subsidised suckler beef is ruining the market for my top quality marbled British retail spec beef from docile dairy cross cattle 🙃



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  • Registered Users Posts: 816 ✭✭✭ minerleague


    Are you the drystock farmer quoted in journal that gave 490/acre for 5 year lease on land 😎 by any chance?



  • Registered Users Posts: 366 ✭✭ trg


    We're going to try that road. Whatever doesn't calve in January gets the road. I'm quite with work in early Spring and we've long winters so plan is to have all calved in January and back in calf in April leaving the shed.

    Sell what isn't staying for breeding in September and October then.

    Need to be really ruthless with culling and probably be very lucky with getting in calf! Will try AI.

    Have a middling outfarm so buy whitehead runners for that in early Spring I think.



  • Registered Users Posts: 366 ✭✭ trg


    Might be reading this wrong.....is it that you've a feeder for 40 calves? What type and cost? Thought you'd need around the 70 mark for one



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,949 ✭✭✭ squinn2912


    Sounds like a good plan. Is the best thing to be ruthless right away or could you pull back calving in stages over 2 years? In the Month of May I have exams so an odd tough day at school but mostly it’s fairly light and a great big long evening. The idea of trying to take cows in for ai or run them with the bull wouldn’t bother me. We even calve a few in May. People be horrified at that when I say it but those ones eat the butt of silage, calve outside and no issue with bedding. A problem is then that when you’re weaning they are smaller calves but if you have a few of them then theres a pen. I haven’t really giving it the right study but I’m not in a panic to cut them out either. The glut of calving in Feb/March is more anguish!



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,361 ✭✭✭ Hard Knocks


    Agree those late calvers can be fed on very little to maintain them over the winter, then out the door as they calve



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,271 ✭✭✭ Jjameson


    I prefer to let someone else do the rearing. I buy steers all breeds and sorts (as long as they are quiet) as year to two year olds depending on whatever whimsical notion takes my brain at the time! There’s not much money in it but no bulling, calving and all that goes with that ,dehorning or castrating. No family time or sleep lost..



  • Registered Users Posts: 11,153 ✭✭✭✭ Danzy


    Part of my reason for getting sheep was because I think the day will come when there will be a lot of lads wanting cattle that are over the year at least and swww7 fb78 all who to rear them to that age and sell on as stores.


    Nearly all dairy cross here in North Cork.


    Costs are gone crazy for us all but the lad with them under 12 months is doing the heavy lifting cost and work wise.



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