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Can I Cancel Notice Given to Landlord?

  • 10-10-2021 8:15pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 231 ✭✭ jo187


    Hi guys

    Tenet asking a question here, living in apartment over years. We gave notice for December that were moving out. Sadly something fell through on our move.

    If we got in touch with the property agent, and ask to reverse the notice, is such a thing possible? Is it at the landlord/agent discretion? We obviously like not to be homeless for Christmas.


    Anybody have similar situations before?


    Thanks

    Post edited by Graham on


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 606 ✭✭✭ houseyhouse


    There’s no harm in asking them. That should be the first step. They may well be happy to save the bother and expense of letting it out again and that could be the end of it. If they’re not happy for you to stay then you can contact RTB to see what the rules are around cancelling your notice of termination.

    By the way, I wouldn’t use the word eviction - it’s confusing in this situation. Eviction means the landlord is ending the tenancy, thus forcing the tenants to leave.



  • Registered Users Posts: 231 ✭✭ jo187


    Thanks very much, your right I did pick the wrong word



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,700 ✭✭✭ cronos


    It's totally at the landlords discretion at this point as you have given notice. Ask nicely however and you may get lucky, earlier you ask the better before they have gone to the hassle and expense of advertising. Will be very dependant on how things have gone thus far in the property.



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,483 ✭✭✭ Claw Hammer


    The RTB often deem notices from landlords to have been withdrawn. There seems to be no reason why you can't withdraw your notice. If you do the landlord would have to go to the RTB to try and have you evicted for overholding. It would be most unlikely the landlord would succeed.



  • Registered Users Posts: 231 ✭✭ jo187


    Thanks guys


    Was in touch today I find out tomorrow



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