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The language requirement for joining the Gardai

  • #2
    Registered Users Posts: 265 ✭✭ Lion Killer


    I have a BSc degree in business (NFQ Level 8). I did not finish school in Ireland. Did end of school exams in the UK.

    For someone who doesn't have Irish leaving cert language result, what would be the best way to proceed? Crack out the books and try to teach myself Irish to a decent level?

    Does anyone know how challenging these alternate Irish language assessments tend to be? Any information about them. The website just state the following:
    (d) Must have a proven proficiency in two languages; one of which must be Irish or English. Such competency may be proven by achieving the relevant grades in an Irish Leaving Certificate or for English or Irish through such assessments as set out by the Public Appointments Service. The contents and scoring mechanism to be used at the assessments (written and oral) will be determined by the Public Appointments Service (PAS).


Comments

  • #2


    You don't have to have Irish.



    You can have Irish OR another language.


  • #2


    HeidiHeidi wrote: »
    You don't have to have Irish.



    You can have Irish OR another language.

    Correct,
    but you still have to learn Irish in college so no harm in doing some work on the language OP


  • #2


    I have a BSc degree in business (NFQ Level 8). I did not finish school in Ireland. Did end of school exams in the UK.

    For someone who doesn't have Irish leaving cert language result, what would be the best way to proceed? Crack out the books and try to teach myself Irish to a decent level?

    Does anyone know how challenging these alternate Irish language assessments tend to be? Any information about them. The website just state the following:

    I did the Irish assessment with PAS l. during covid it was changed to online so didnt have to do the written piece and only answered questions on screen while recorded,not live. To prepare I read a few intro books I did 6months with a tutor and had failed it in lc but passed the assessment with pas. It was hard enough but your given the topics before hand and the question reflect the topics well but can be any type of question. I'd say if you didn't do it all through school you might struggle. Could you look into getting an A or O level in another language you studied? The Irish exam holds you back in the process by months. My oom was very low but the assessment held me back, just to keep in mind.


  • #2


    HeidiHeidi wrote: »
    You don't have to have Irish.



    You can have Irish OR another language.

    I don't have any language beyond junior cert unfortunately.


  • #2


    U can could apply do the leaving cert Irish exam as a mature student but like it is a long shot. I missed 2019 campaign due just leaving college but I know from a few friends that they went and did some leaving cert subjects


  • #2


    I don't have any language beyond junior cert unfortunately.
    Might be easier to bump one of those up to LC level maybe?


  • #2


    Jose1997 wrote: »
    U can could apply do the leaving cert Irish exam as a mature student but like it is a long shot. I missed 2019 campaign due just leaving college but I know from a few friends that they went and did some leaving cert subjects

    I always hated Irish at school. Have 0 knowledge of it now. Really hate all the Irish requirements in place in this country.

    What is the latest stage in the process you need to show proficiency. If they open up applications at the end of the year, would I need to show proof then at that stage or would I still have more time? Unlikely to be able to do LC this year, possibly could next.
    HeidiHeidi wrote: »
    Might be easier to bump one of those up to LC level maybe?

    You know, actually just thinking about it. They wave Irish requirements in school for some people with disabilities. I am in the process of being assessed for a disability (autism). I wonder if I could provide medical proof and become exempt.

    I think I'll send them an email and ask.

    Wonder what the easiest way to proceed with doing a language is? Hmm. I would be starting with basically 0 knowledge. Is it right that a D3 at ordinary LC is all you need? How difficult could that be? Not like you need an A at higher level but I have always hated languages


  • #2


    I always hated Irish at school. Have 0 knowledge of it now. Really hate all the Irish requirements in place in this country.

    What is the latest stage in the process you need to show proficiency. If they open up applications at the end of the year, would I need to show proof then at that stage or would I still have more time? Unlikely to be able to do LC this year, possibly could next.




    You know, actually just thinking about it. They wave Irish requirements in school for some people with disabilities. I am in the process of being assessed for a disability (autism). I wonder if I could provide medical proof and become exempt.

    I think I'll send them an email and ask.

    Wonder what the easiest way to proceed with doing a language is? Hmm. I would be starting with basically 0 knowledge. Is it right that a D3 at ordinary LC is all you need? How difficult could that be? Not like you need an A at higher level but I have always hated languages

    You need to show a minimum d3 at ordinary level at interview stage , and no you will not be allowed proceed without it , there is no exemptions for disability as far as I am aware
    Sitting an ordinary level Irish paper is your best bet , good luck with it


  • #2


    NorthWestJ wrote: »
    You need to show a minimum d3 at ordinary level at interview stage , and no you will not be allowed proceed without it , there is no exemptions for disability as far as I am aware
    Sitting an ordinary level Irish paper is your best bet , good luck with it

    Yeh u get no exemptions like I’m dyslexic but I did Irish for my LC a few years go. I know u can do the Irish LC part time like :)


  • #2


    Hi guys,

    I'm a bit confused by what I am reading here. If you don't meet the Irish Grades from your Leaving Cert, do you not have to simply complete the PAS (Public Appointments Service) test in order to approve competency.

    I personally failed Irish at ordinary level during my Leaving Cert, so just assumed that if I successfully progressed through a recruitment campaign, I would eventually be requested to complete the PAS written and Oral test. As such I fail to see the logic behind going out of your way to re-sit the Irish LC exam.


  • #2


    zoomanjo wrote: »
    Hi guys,

    I'm a bit confused by what I am reading here. If you don't meet the Irish Grades from your Leaving Cert, do you not have to simply complete the PAS (Public Appointments Service) test in order to approve competency.

    I personally failed Irish at ordinary level during my Leaving Cert, so just assumed that if I successfully progressed through a recruitment campaign, I would eventually be requested to complete the PAS written and Oral test. As such I fail to see the logic behind going out of your way to re-sit the Irish LC exam.


    You're absolutely right.


    I think the discussion surrounding being more proactive and getting it done prior to the campaign, was a direct result of the suggestion that needing to take that exam made an already lengthy process even longer for previous applicants.



    Hope that helps.


  • #2


    Zux wrote: »
    You're absolutely right.


    I think the discussion surrounding being more proactive and getting it done prior to the campaign, was a direct result of the suggestion that needing to take that exam made an already lengthy process even longer for previous applicants.



    Hope that helps.
    Thanks for your reply dude. I understand where you are coming from now. In hindsight it might have just been better for myself to have sat it these past two years.


  • #2


    zoomanjo wrote: »
    Hi guys,

    I'm a bit confused by what I am reading here. If you don't meet the Irish Grades from your Leaving Cert, do you not have to simply complete the PAS (Public Appointments Service) test in order to approve competency.

    I personally failed Irish at ordinary level during my Leaving Cert, so just assumed that if I successfully progressed through a recruitment campaign, I would eventually be requested to complete the PAS written and Oral test. As such I fail to see the logic behind going out of your way to re-sit the Irish LC exam.

    Correct, you present your lc results to PAS you go through all the process with them. When you pass the interview with them then they email you saying that you haven't irish and that you will be invited to an assessment. Last year it was going to be November but was out off then covid hit so it was in April.
    There is no way to avoid the language requirement. I've asked, researched it emailed Garda hr emailed PAS. You HAVE to meet the language requirements. Very hard to find somewhere to do irish in the LC unless you are free midweek and can work it around your job.


  • #2


    Does anyone know what way the language barrier works if you did the Leaving Cert Applied ??


  • #2


    CD2020! wrote: »
    Correct, you present your lc results to PAS you go through all the process with them. When you pass the interview with them then they email you saying that you haven't irish and that you will be invited to an assessment. Last year it was going to be November but was out off then covid hit so it was in April.
    There is no way to avoid the language requirement. I've asked, researched it emailed Garda hr emailed PAS. You HAVE to meet the language requirements. Very hard to find somewhere to do irish in the LC unless you are free midweek and can work it around your job.

    It's a shame. Realistically, I am not sure it is doable for me. My knowledge of Irish at this point is 0. I am unemployed so I would have plenty of time to work with but I just don't know if it is realistic to teach yourself to the required level.

    I have no aptitude for languages


  • #2


    It's a shame. Realistically, I am not sure it is doable for me. My knowledge of Irish at this point is 0. I am unemployed so I would have plenty of time to work with but I just don't know if it is realistic to teach yourself to the required level.

    I have no aptitude for languages


    I would imagine a European language might be easier to start from scratch than Irish - the grammar in German is complicated, but straightforward, if that makes sense - once you've learned a rule, that's basically it. French is full of exceptions to the rules. I found German an absolute pudding to learn in school compared to French. And Irish - even I as an Irish-lover will admit - is fiendish from a grammar point of view.


    You need to have one language to LC level (apart from English, assuming English is your first language), and you'll have to do another one at basic level in the college (afaik know that will be Irish if you don't already have it, but I'm not 100% on that detail) - so if languages aren't your thing then you might struggle.


  • #2


    Brendan k wrote: »
    Does anyone know what way the language barrier works if you did the Leaving Cert Applied ??

    U need to have Irish u can do by pas if u did not do leaving cert and u need a leaving cert or/and level 5 or about degree or diploma if leaving cert is not done :)


  • #2


    i did the leaving cert applied and for the language i did italian, i copied this, what exactly does it mean.



    In certain cases a Pass in the Applied Leaving Certificate may be deemed equivalent to an Ordinary Leaving Certificate. In addition, applicants must also have proven proficiency in two languages


  • #2


    Brendan k wrote: »
    i did the leaving cert applied and for the language i did italian, i copied this, what exactly does it mean.



    In certain cases a Pass in the Applied Leaving Certificate may be deemed equivalent to an Ordinary Leaving Certificate. In addition, applicants must also have proven proficiency in two languages


    Its hard to say with certainty,but its no cooincidence they wrote that in a vague manner. My sense of things is they rarely apply the "certain cases" (I have never heard of them doing so).


    As far as I know, when it comes to maths and language requirements, the leaving cert applied is not considered an acceptable standard.


    The only way to be certain though is to email your specific circumstances and ask.


  • #2


    It's a shame. Realistically, I am not sure it is doable for me. My knowledge of Irish at this point is 0. I am unemployed so I would have plenty of time to work with but I just don't know if it is realistic to teach yourself to the required level.

    I have no aptitude for languages

    Buy this book. Complete Irish by Diarmuid O Se or the Buntas Cainte pack. Just start with that basic intro. Honestly I hadn't a clue of it then I started reading them books. When I got to grinds it was great help. In the end everything in the exam is learnt off by heart you just to know what they are asking and in what tense but its all learnt off. To be honest if u get to apply this year it'll end of 2022 b4 u get the Irish assessment in pas so u have time.


  • #2


    Folks, can I just jump in for a moment.

    I got over this stage, tuff going.

    What I would say is that in the college itself you will be required to complete the Irish module no exceptions. I wouldn't worry to much about it, however if your taking grinds the basics will serve you well. I'd defiantly invest time in the oral stuff.


  • #2


    zoomanjo wrote: »
    Hi guys,

    I'm a bit confused by what I am reading here. If you don't meet the Irish Grades from your Leaving Cert, do you not have to simply complete the PAS (Public Appointments Service) test in order to approve competency.

    I personally failed Irish at ordinary level during my Leaving Cert, so just assumed that if I successfully progressed through a recruitment campaign, I would eventually be requested to complete the PAS written and Oral test. As such I fail to see the logic behind going out of your way to re-sit the Irish LC exam.

    Interesting. So just build up your own command of Irish and forget doing LC again. How do we know what they actually test? I mean how would we prepare when we don't know the content of the text? That would be tough.
    zoomanjo wrote: »
    Thanks for your reply dude. I understand where you are coming from now. In hindsight it might have just been better for myself to have sat it these past two years.

    Likewise, but it's best not to dwell on the negatives. Easy to get down about it. I've been sitting on my arse unemployed since university.
    CD2020! wrote: »
    Correct, you present your lc results to PAS you go through all the process with them. When you pass the interview with them then they email you saying that you haven't irish and that you will be invited to an assessment. Last year it was going to be November but was out off then covid hit so it was in April.
    There is no way to avoid the language requirement. I've asked, researched it emailed Garda hr emailed PAS. You HAVE to meet the language requirements. Very hard to find somewhere to do irish in the LC unless you are free midweek and can work it around your job.

    Thanks for the info.
    HeidiHeidi wrote: »
    I would imagine a European language might be easier to start from scratch than Irish - the grammar in German is complicated, but straightforward, if that makes sense - once you've learned a rule, that's basically it. French is full of exceptions to the rules. I found German an absolute pudding to learn in school compared to French. And Irish - even I as an Irish-lover will admit - is fiendish from a grammar point of view.


    You need to have one language to LC level (apart from English, assuming English is your first language), and you'll have to do another one at basic level in the college (afaik know that will be Irish if you don't already have it, but I'm not 100% on that detail) - so if languages aren't your thing then you might struggle.

    I would actually embrace the opportunity to learn German. Could I fit in a german LC paper next year I wonder before possibly getting called for the Gardai? Wonder would the timelines work out.
    CD2020! wrote: »
    Buy this book. Complete Irish by Diarmuid O Se or the Buntas Cainte pack. Just start with that basic intro. Honestly I hadn't a clue of it then I started reading them books. When I got to grinds it was great help. In the end everything in the exam is learnt off by heart you just to know what they are asking and in what tense but its all learnt off. To be honest if u get to apply this year it'll end of 2022 b4 u get the Irish assessment in pas so u have time.

    Thanks for the info. End of 2022 would give me plenty of time to do it. :D
    TallGlass2 wrote: »
    Folks, can I just jump in for a moment.

    I got over this stage, tuff going.

    What I would say is that in the college itself you will be required to complete the Irish module no exceptions. I wouldn't worry to much about it, however if your taking grinds the basics will serve you well. I'd defiantly invest time in the oral stuff.

    You did the Irish test at the college? How was it? What did they test you on?


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