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Benefits of being a Garda

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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,418 ✭✭✭ Infernal Racket


    Zux wrote: »
    Thanks for the replies lads, is there specific things you think result in becoming disillusioned or complacent with the job?

    I think I'd have a pretty reasoned outlook on the role at this point, would be under no illusions about the failings of the justice system etc, curious about what caused it for you, if that happened.

    Biggest cause for disillusion is probably senior management having absolutely no idea about what's happening on the ground yet pretending they do and also the court system. You could spend weeks, months or sometimes years working on an investigation only to see a judge hand out a paltry conviction because the defendent hired or probably got a free solicitor and barrister who told a very good sob story which, in the vast majority of times works a charm on the disconnected from reality judge.


  • Posts: 230 ✭✭ [Deleted User]


    Biggest cause for disillusion is probably senior management having absolutely no idea about what's happening on the ground yet pretending they do and also the court system. You could spend weeks, months or sometimes years working on an investigation only to see a judge hand out a paltry conviction because the defendent hired or probably got a free solicitor and barrister who told a very good sob story which, in the vast majority of times works a charm on the disconnected from reality judge.


    Makes total sense, I have a legal background so can appreciate the realities of what goes on. I have heard the same thing from every member I spoke with, so its good to prepare myself for ahead of time.


    As for higher management not understanding the realities of those on the ground, that seems to be inevitable in most industries and jobs it seems.


    Thanks for the response !


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,269 ✭✭✭ Loveinapril


    I am not a garda but often deal with them in my social care job. I know a few people who studied social care, worked in the area for a few years then became excellent Gardaí because of the compassion they had for the most vulnerable in society. If you are thinking of studying anything before joining, social care would b3 a good one. You would get a deeper knowledge into addiction, homelessness, at risk families, travelling community and other issues that you would face on a daily basis as a Garda.


  • Registered Users Posts: 36 lg.cardonha


    How can a Garda join the Europol? I heard the Europol headquarters is the Phoenix Park. Does anyone know someone how has joined it?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,882 ✭✭✭ SouthWesterly


    I deal with guards frequently
    The amount of people who tell me they are going through a divorce is scarey. Seems to be a big problem with the job

    Add to that the amount of people dealing with serious personal injuries.

    Not a job I'd recommend to anyone.


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  • Posts: 230 ✭✭ [Deleted User]


    I deal with guards frequently
    The amount of people who tell me they are going through a divorce is scarey. Seems to be a big problem with the job


    Definitely is a common thread amongst law enforcement all over the world.



    One of the many reasons people consider it a vocation I guess.


  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Regional South East Moderators Posts: 12,353 Mod ✭✭✭✭ byhookorbycrook


    Best friend is a Banner. In civil unrest , she was always targeted as being “ the weakest link.” One of her earliest assignments was to search the roadside for a baby not properly strapped into their baby seat at an RTA .
    She’s been spat at, scratched , kicked and bitten ( and believe me , she’s tall and very physically fit) as have her male colleagues. Wouldn’t be my idea of fun .


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,043 ✭✭✭ Dohvolle


    How can a Garda join the Europol? I heard the Europol headquarters is the Phoenix Park. Does anyone know someone how has joined it?

    I have a friend who works in Europol. That's after 25 years in the force, 10 of which were spent in GASU.
    Europol HQ is in the Hague. a 10 second google told me that.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,043 ✭✭✭ Dohvolle


    Zux wrote: »
    Definitely is a common thread amongst law enforcement all over the world.



    One of the many reasons people consider it a vocation I guess.

    When you spend more time dealing with high stress situations with a colleague, and only see your spouse for a few hours before sleep, and you can't discuss what you went through in work for numerous reasons, it is inevitable that members of the force get drawn (a) to each other and (b) away from their non-policing partners and spouses.
    It is not a new phenomenon either. However it is also the reason Gardai and Nurses end up together.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,043 ✭✭✭ Dohvolle


    Best friend is a Banner. In civil unrest , she was always targeted as being “ the weakest link.” One of her earliest assignments was to search the roadside for a baby not properly strapped into their baby seat at an RTA .
    She’s been spat at, scratched , kicked and bitten ( and believe me , she’s tall and very physically fit) as have her male colleagues. Wouldn’t be my idea of fun .

    A classmate had the job of searching a field for the head of a motorcyclist who had been involved in a head on collision. It was still in its helmet. The car driver was jailed (overtaking on a continuous white line).
    Being spat at, scratched, kicked and bitten is not the preserve of Gardai who are female. Those engaged in violence will always pick on those they consider weaker. Nothing to do with gender, it's just primal instinct taking over. They will attack those they feel they will succeed against. The female of the species, by nature, is not as good at being as physically intimidating as the male. Otherwise physically they are just as good at the job and during self defence training I frequently sparred with females. Most I worked with were as good, if not better than males in the same role.
    There is no such thing as a "banner" any more. The term was phased out in the late 1980s/early 90s. All "banners" are by now either retired, or at A/Comm level.


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  • Posts: 18,752 ✭✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    Plenty of women members are still called banners, for some reason younger women don't like it, I have no idea why, they will be called much worse during their working life :)

    The job is still full of nepotism and favouritism, that can cause disillusion. But that's probably the same in many different work environments.
    Look at the post above, he probably knew some guys who joined AGS, same people but maybe now they can't do quite the same things that they used to, or maybe they advise their friends to be careful, then the above post is what their 'friend's now think of them.

    Edit, actually that post disappeared!
    Basically, you're damned if you do, damned if you don't.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 91 ✭✭ ussrsoviet


    bubblypop wrote: »
    Plenty of women members are still called banners, for some reason younger women don't like it, I have no idea why, they will be called much worse during their working life :)

    The job is still full of nepotism and favouritism, that can cause disillusion. But that's probably the same in many different work environments.
    Look at the post above, he probably knew some guys who joined AGS, same people but maybe now they can't do quite the same things that they used to, or maybe they advise their friends to be careful, then the above post is what their 'friend's now think of them.

    Edit, actually that post disappeared!
    Basically, you're damned if you do, damned if you don't.

    all you constantly hear is 'templemore will change you, you will never come back the same' or 'say goodbye to your life'....such narrow minded opinions:rolleyes:


  • Registered Users Posts: 114 ✭✭ banjoh_10


    Any serving members here know of any updates on new recruits starting?


  • Registered Users Posts: 173 ✭✭ AF96DUB


    I am not a garda but often deal with them in my social care job. I know a few people who studied social care, worked in the area for a few years then became excellent Gardaí because of the compassion they had for the most vulnerable in society. If you are thinking of studying anything before joining, social care would b3 a good one. You would get a deeper knowledge into addiction, homelessness, at risk families, travelling community and other issues that you would face on a daily basis as a Garda.

    This is the exact background I come from myself, you gain all the experience required for the role in terms of conflict management, physical and mental health crisis and empathy etc. On my meetings with the Inspector and sergeant, they told me its the ideal work to do before applying so I would encourage anyone to do some of that work before applying!


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,368 ✭✭✭ JimmyVik


    I thought i wouldnt mind being a guard.
    Then I watched "Inside the K"
    Game over


  • Registered Users Posts: 16 Hopeful12


    Biggest cause for disillusion is probably senior management having absolutely no idea about what's happening on the ground yet pretending they do and also the court system. You could spend weeks, months or sometimes years working on an investigation only to see a judge hand out a paltry conviction because the defendent hired or probably got a free solicitor and barrister who told a very good sob story which, in the vast majority of times works a charm on the disconnected from reality judge.
    Just a quick question on your take regarding "senior management being disillusioned to the job".
    As there is no cadetship program in AGS all members start at the rank of Garda and work their way up the chain of command. While no organisation is perfect, surely this apprenticeship style hierarchy allows for more "in tune" leadership when compared with most private organisations?

    As for the court system, I would imagine it must be quite demotivating when hard work becomes undone by a lenient judge!

    Interested in your opinion on this one!

    Thanks!


  • Registered Users Posts: 11 TravisLogan123


    JimmyVik wrote: »
    I thought i wouldnt mind being a guard.
    Then I watched "Inside the K"
    Game over

    Funnily enough, watching that show made me want to join the guards even more , and especially , to request Dublin as my station :D such an education you would get above compared to being down the country


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,043 ✭✭✭ Dohvolle


    Funnily enough, watching that show made me want to join the guards even more , and especially , to request Dublin as my station :D such an education you would get above compared to being down the country

    Because down the country the GS only deal with things like no tax on the tractor and Sheep rustling?
    The only difference between Dublin and any other station in Ireland is Dublin have more backup to call on when the natives get restless. If you are down the country, and it's 2AM, you may be the only 2 members on duty, and the nearest neighbouring car is 40 miles in the opposite direction, that's when you earn your pay.
    I was stationed in Limerick. One summer Saturday, as all the crowd falling from the pubs were getting messy outside Supermacs, there was a total of 8 gardai available in the city, between 3 stations.
    When I was on phase 2 in Cork, I was involved in 3 different murder inquiries.
    There is life beyond the pale, you know.


  • Posts: 18,752 ✭✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    Funnily enough, watching that show made me want to join the guards even more , and especially , to request Dublin as my station :D such an education you would get above compared to being down the country

    Far more to being a guard then dealing with little toerags from housing estates.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11 TravisLogan123


    Dohvolle wrote: »
    Because down the country the GS only deal with things like no tax on the tractor and Sheep rustling?
    The only difference between Dublin and any other station in Ireland is Dublin have more backup to call on when the natives get restless. If you are down the country, and it's 2AM, you may be the only 2 members on duty, and the nearest neighbouring car is 40 miles in the opposite direction, that's when you earn your pay.
    I was stationed in Limerick. One summer Saturday, as all the crowd falling from the pubs were getting messy outside Supermacs, there was a total of 8 gardai available in the city, between 3 stations.
    When I was on phase 2 in Cork, I was involved in 3 different murder inquiries.
    There is life beyond the pale, you know.

    That’s not what I meant at all , i was just saying them type of scenarios appealed to me , I never said anything about guards down the country being inferior at all
    Dublin and cities just seems to be constant go go go ,

    I’v heard enough stories from Garda friends that are stationed in rural areas and their days seem mundane enough


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,043 ✭✭✭ Dohvolle


    That’s not what I meant at all , i was just saying them type of scenarios appealed to me , I never said anything about guards down the country being inferior at all
    Dublin and cities just seems to be constant go go go ,

    I’v heard enough stories from Garda friends that are stationed in rural areas and their days seem mundane enough

    By the same token you could get a Dublin station and spend all your days on posts outside the Dail, or outside some retired ministers house (while he is out of the country on holidays).
    You'll take what you get, you'll go where you are needed. If HQ can disenfranchise you in some way while doing so, they will.
    Jackeens usually get left within the pale though. The blood start's rushing from their head once they pass the last bus stop with "Dublin Bus" written on it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 683 ✭✭✭ TallGlass2


    I will bring a bit of 'balance', I am an ex member of AGG. I left, as it was not for me.

    What was not for me, was the role was nearly still vocational in mindset/what is requested of you. Yet, your expected to also balance a 'normal' lifestyle with the role. So you have a vocational mindset clashing with a career mindset.

    The regular unit, I will not lie, it is tuff work most of the time. Yes there is downtime, however that downtime is quickly made up for in other areas of the regular. Like you might get an hour or two 'free' but trust me if it is in anyway a busy station, you will work in 2 hours in 1, or even 3 hours in 1!

    There is no way around the regular, at a guess you'll be on it for 5/7/10 years before moving (if you even move). There is a term called a 'mule', never liked that term to be honest nor never understood why anyone would call themselves as such. Regardless, you'll essentially do all the heavy lifting as the 'core' unit, as a new addition to the unit (not right away but in time) you will do the bottom end stuff and eventually move up the ladder of the unit (still however the unit still does the heavy lifting for the most part).

    I would still say to anyone, if your interested, really think about it first. It is a fairly sizable effort to get in and trained up. I would also say to that person, be prepared to walk away also. It is not easy to walk away from, trust me. You'll have told everyone, you'll be thinking 'what will they think of me' and so on. Quite frankly in my experience no one actually cares!

    I'm not here or going to slate AGS, I do not hold anything bad about AGS. Its a hell of a tuff job, and there are excellent members in the organisation at all ranks.

    Options will vary from member to member, be it retire, in service or ex.

    The flip side to this all is, that you might really enjoy it.

    That said, really consider everything.

    Then consider all that in 3/5 years.

    Then consider it again about how you'd feel after 10 years, then 20 years.

    25/30 not so much your in it for the long haul then!

    Posters have mentioned valid points, consider also 'external' or core parts of the job that are actually part of another state system, such as court and that side of things (dealing with solicitors etc..). As in percentage wise arresting someone is about 5% of the work load (made up figure, but my point is there is actually far more to it). As an example, I watch YouTube videos now, I see the excitement and I then think to myself 'thank god that is not me, the paperwork and reports in that'.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16 Hopeful12


    TallGlass2 wrote: »
    I will bring a bit of 'balance', I am an ex member of AGG. I left, as it was not for me.

    What was not for me, was the role was nearly still vocational in mindset/what is requested of you. Yet, your expected to also balance a 'normal' lifestyle with the role. So you have a vocational mindset clashing with a career mindset.

    The regular unit, I will not lie, it is tuff work most of the time. Yes there is downtime, however that downtime is quickly made up for in other areas of the regular. Like you might get an hour or two 'free' but trust me if it is in anyway a busy station, you will work in 2 hours in 1, or even 3 hours in 1!

    There is no way around the regular, at a guess you'll be on it for 5/7/10 years before moving (if you even move). There is a term called a 'mule', never liked that term to be honest nor never understood why anyone would call themselves as such. Regardless, you'll essentially do all the heavy lifting as the 'core' unit, as a new addition to the unit (not right away but in time) you will do the bottom end stuff and eventually move up the ladder of the unit (still however the unit still does the heavy lifting for the most part).

    I would still say to anyone, if your interested, really think about it first. It is a fairly sizable effort to get in and trained up. I would also say to that person, be prepared to walk away also. It is not easy to walk away from, trust me. You'll have told everyone, you'll be thinking 'what will they think of me' and so on. Quite frankly in my experience no one actually cares!

    I'm not here or going to slate AGS, I do not hold anything bad about AGS. Its a hell of a tuff job, and there are excellent members in the organisation at all ranks.

    Options will vary from member to member, be it retire, in service or ex.

    The flip side to this all is, that you might really enjoy it.

    That said, really consider everything.

    Then consider all that in 3/5 years.

    Then consider it again about how you'd feel after 10 years, then 20 years.

    25/30 not so much your in it for the long haul then!

    Posters have mentioned valid points, consider also 'external' or core parts of the job that are actually part of another state system, such as court and that side of things (dealing with solicitors etc..). As in percentage wise arresting someone is about 5% of the work load (made up figure, but my point is there is actually far more to it). As an example, I watch YouTube videos now, I see the excitement and I then think to myself 'thank god that is not me, the paperwork and reports in that'.

    Thanks for the honest answer, really good to hear from someone who has been there and done it!
    I have heard friends echo your sentiment on the "regular" - I've heard of some members getting "lucky" and moving into a specialist unit very quickly and I know someone who actually decliend a move as they enjoyed the regular so much. Having the long haul mindset seems to be the way to go!!

    Did you find it hard to pick up a job back in civvy life and how was your AGS experience viewed in private industry?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,043 ✭✭✭ Dohvolle


    Hopeful12 wrote: »
    Thanks for the honest answer, really good to hear from someone who has been there and done it!
    I have heard friends echo your sentiment on the "regular" - I've heard of some members getting "lucky" and moving into a specialist unit very quickly and I know someone who actually decliend a move as they enjoyed the regular so much. Having the long haul mindset seems to be the way to go!!

    Did you find it hard to pick up a job back in civvy life and how was your AGS experience viewed in private industry?

    If I can answer this one also, I'm gone over 20 years now, and experienced the full range of post-garda questions.
    I left AGS on a date of my choosing, and had a job lined up with a civvy company I dealt with at an RTA. (material damage, their truck hit a low bridge- they needed a driver). I found it important to get as far from policing as I could in my first civvy job , post AGS. Civvy employer didn't care about my garda experience. I did end up working in the security industry later on, where my training was an obvious advantage, but no more so than anyone else with half a brain and a driving licence. Modern security is more H&S than loss prevention. Once the gate is closed and the premises isn't on fire, the employer is happy. My DF experience was probably more relevant in private security than my Garda experience, as the DF is more accustomed to guard duties where nothing happens for long periods of time, and the priority is who has what keys. It looks good on a CV, but it also invites questions.
    People will ask why you left AGS, there is a perception it is the best job in the world, with good pay, good perks and a great pension. You can tell them what you want to, and leave them with that incorrect perception. Nobody will care.
    If you decided to work in policing in another country, you may have an advantage over a person that didn't. Otherwise, you have as much hope as anyone who hasn't been involved in crime up to the day they applied.


  • Registered Users Posts: 776 ✭✭✭ Get Real


    From a friend, it has its benefits. But be aware it will take your time where you have to stay on, have to attend court dates etc. Alot of cancelled nights out and run meet ups with him cancelled. Consider if you have kids or a family. A 12 hour shift can turn into 16 or 17.

    Also, he has alot of court, on days off. Its paid of course, but your days off aren't really your days off.

    Finally, although small numbers wise, and you won't read every case in the news, but on a per capita basis, they have 4 times the suicide rate of the general population. So look after your mental health if you go for it.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.irishtimes.com/news/crime-and-law/garda-deaths-by-suicide-four-times-national-average-figures-suggest-1.4255445%3fmode=amp


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,875 ✭✭✭ Edgware


    A Garda relative told me that the most important influence on your career is your first station and unit. If you get into a busy station with a good unit of Gardai, male and female, who are interested in work you will have a great start. There are also many different areas where you can apply to get into and generally if you are a sound good worker you will get there. Promotion is competitive and like everything in Ireland there can be "pull" involved.
    Before options for detective, drug squads etc were nearly confined to Dublin but every Division has drug units, armed units, traffic corps etc. Also there are options for service with the United Nations, Europol etc.
    Of course some lads will bitch about a Garda having "pull" when the only reason is because he or she is a good worker


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,043 ✭✭✭ Dohvolle


    Edgware wrote: »
    A Garda relative told me that the most important influence on your career is your first station and unit. If you get into a busy station with a good unit of Gardai, male and female, who are interested in work you will have a great start. There are also many different areas where you can apply to get into and generally if you are a sound good worker you will get there. Promotion is competitive and like everything in Ireland there can be "pull" involved.
    Before options for detective, drug squads etc were nearly confined to Dublin but every Division has drug units, armed units, traffic corps etc. Also there are options for service with the United Nations, Europol etc.
    Of course some lads will bitch about a Garda having "pull" when the only reason is because he or she is a good worker

    It's not pull, it's "Influence".:rolleyes:


  • Registered Users Posts: 65 ✭✭ CD2020!


    TallGlass2 wrote: »
    I will bring a bit of 'balance', I am an ex member of AGG. I left, as it was not for me.

    What was not for me, was the role was nearly still vocational in mindset/what is requested of you. Yet, your expected to also balance a 'normal' lifestyle with the role. So you have a vocational mindset clashing with a career mindset.

    The regular unit, I will not lie, it is tuff work most of the time. Yes there is downtime, however that downtime is quickly made up for in other areas of the regular. Like you might get an hour or two 'free' but trust me if it is in anyway a busy station, you will work in 2 hours in 1, or even 3 hours in 1!

    There is no way around the regular, at a guess you'll be on it for 5/7/10 years before moving (if you even move). There is a term called a 'mule', never liked that term to be honest nor never understood why anyone would call themselves as such. Regardless, you'll essentially do all the heavy lifting as the 'core' unit, as a new addition to the unit (not right away but in time) you will do the bottom end stuff and eventually move up the ladder of the unit (still however the unit still does the heavy lifting for the most part).

    I would still say to anyone, if your interested, really think about it first. It is a fairly sizable effort to get in and trained up. I would also say to that person, be prepared to walk away also. It is not easy to walk away from, trust me. You'll have told everyone, you'll be thinking 'what will they think of me' and so on. Quite frankly in my experience no one actually cares!

    I'm not here or going to slate AGS, I do not hold anything bad about AGS. Its a hell of a tuff job, and there are excellent members in the organisation at all ranks.

    Options will vary from member to member, be it retire, in service or ex.

    The flip side to this all is, that you might really enjoy it.

    That said, really consider everything.

    Then consider all that in 3/5 years.

    Then consider it again about how you'd feel after 10 years, then 20 years.

    25/30 not so much your in it for the long haul then!

    Posters have mentioned valid points, consider also 'external' or core parts of the job that are actually part of another state system, such as court and that side of things (dealing with solicitors etc..). As in percentage wise arresting someone is about 5% of the work load (made up figure, but my point is there is actually far more to it). As an example, I watch YouTube videos now, I see the excitement and I then think to myself 'thank god that is not me, the paperwork and reports in that'.

    Yeah a 45 minute lunch or none at all, hours on end sitting with prisoners, horrible abuse interviews, attending suicides, sitting with the body while waiting for doc to attend. Searching a junkie with a wrap in their foreskin (who wants to pull that back?) Pee S and worse left after prisoners in the car. These are the all extra pieces nobody thinks about u till they are confronted with it and left shook.


  • Registered Users Posts: 65 ✭✭ CD2020!


    How can a Garda join the Europol? I heard the Europol headquarters is the Phoenix Park. Does anyone know someone how has joined it?

    Its a secondment you'd have to be a guard already depending on the job you want


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,875 ✭✭✭ Edgware


    Dohvolle wrote: »
    It's not pull, it's "Influence".:rolleyes:

    In New York its called a hook


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