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Garden shed to store motorcycle?

  • 31-01-2021 10:08pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 261 ✭✭ pegdrums


    Hi all.

    Short version of a long story. To extend the rear of our house I have to lose my rickety block shed that came with the house.

    The cost of building a block shed is out of the question, metal shed is a possibility but I really would prefer a wooden shed. Easier to live with, hang a tool wall and shelves, insulate etc.

    Shed is gonna be 12ft x 10ft. Double doors, 2 windows. Not a log cabin just a decent shed.

    It's gonna store my Transalp, bicycles, surfboard, all the camping gear, all my tools and will also be getting a workbench put in.

    Concrete or wooden floor?

    I'd love a concrete floor. I could paint it like my old one which made finding screws, nails, bolts that fall nice and handy.
    2 shed companies told me I couldn't plonk a shed on a concrete slab....it would still need to be sat on paving slabs.

    Does anyone have a wooden shed with a concrete floor?


    Second question is two fold......

    Would a wooden floor be strong enough for TA plus workbench etc??

    Going in and out with a dripping wet bike, is that gonna eventually rot the floor?

    Thanks for reading


«1

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,459 ✭✭✭ zubair


    I would have thought thats too small for all that stuff.

    Well a wooden shed will rot. My petrol mower went through the floor of mine when it rotted. And a bike will probably damage it as soon as it starts to weaken so you will eventually have to replace it. A metal shed is a better investment and suits your needs.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,709 ✭✭✭✭ listermint


    Wooden shed is a silly idea no offence but it's an all round inferior product to a metal one.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,192 ✭✭✭ gipi


    I had a wooden shed, 12 X 12, with a wooden floor on a concrete base which stored 3 bikes at one stage (including a pan and a beemer 650). I had no problems with rotting floors or condensation for the 10+ years I had the shed (it's still standing, I moved house).


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,101 ✭✭✭ Max Headroom


    Built a wooden cabin 8 years ago with treated timbers....wooden floor doubled up 1.5 inches thick..4 bikes , lawnmower, fridge etc in there are no issue......best part is it doesnt look like a tin shed...:)


  • Registered Users Posts: 654 ✭✭✭ Breezin


    I have a wooden shed (as I live in a terraced house with no garage), and it works well.

    There are sheds and sheds -- get a good one with wall and roof insulation for a few euro more. Mine came with ventilation at the top but I added extra. A good shed maker also will customise the width of the door so that it the bike fits in.

    The floor won't rot or get damaged by the weight of the bike because it has an additional layer of tough marine ply screwed down to it.

    If you search this forum you will see lots of people mentioning condensation problems with their steel sheds.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 654 ✭✭✭ Breezin


    Built a wooden cabin 8 years ago with treated timbers....wooden floor doubled up 1.5 inches thick..4 bikes , lawnmower, fridge etc in there are no issue......best part is it doesnt look like a tin shed...:)


    That too! :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,176 ✭✭✭ Fabio


    If I were you I'd have a concrete base laid and put a steel shed on that. Yes, there can be condensation issues if there's not enough airflow through the steel shed but most of them have an anti-condensation liner to stop drips coming from the roof, and enough ventilation that condensation doesn't stick around too long.

    There's no maintenance with a steel shed really and they'll last forever.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,553 ✭✭✭ Cork Trucker


    Steel tech shed = No condensation. I’m in the process of buying one myself


  • Registered Users Posts: 426 ✭✭ robbie_63


    I'm hoping to get a small shed for my own bike in the next few weeks,

    I would be looking at Timber also, once you have extra plywood sheets supported on the floor it should be strong enough to hold the bike.


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators Posts: 17,161 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Henry Ford III


    Fabio wrote: »
    If I were you I'd have a concrete base laid and put a steel shed on that. Yes, there can be condensation issues if there's not enough airflow through the steel shed but most of them have an anti-condensation liner to stop drips coming from the roof, and enough ventilation that condensation doesn't stick around too long.

    There's no maintenance with a steel shed really and they'll last forever.

    10 years and mine is toast. Rusting out.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 261 ✭✭ pegdrums


    pretty heated issue between steel or wood it seems!

    looked at a few steeltech sheds there at the weekend....they seemed sturdier than i had imagined. nice looking bit of kit. Putting a window in is almost 300 quid though. Insulating them seems harder and after just working out the cost of a concrete base is more expensive than I thought I'll be staying wood I think.

    my budget is around the 2k mark.

    I like the idea of adding a sheet of marine ply to the floor. one company said they could add extra floor struts too.

    how do youanage access with the marine play installed? did ya build a ramp?


  • Registered Users Posts: 654 ✭✭✭ Breezin


    Shed wars! :eek:

    The ply on the floor doesn't add any real height to it. I screwed it straight on. It's lower than the floor lip in the door frame.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,709 ✭✭✭✭ listermint


    10 years and mine is toast. Rusting out.

    Badly installed or wrong materials tbh.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,459 ✭✭✭ zubair


    Breezin wrote: »
    Shed wars! :eek:

    Jesus, we're showing our age now.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,709 ✭✭✭✭ listermint


    LIGHTNING wrote: »
    Does anybody do decent sized plastic ones? That solves the rusting/rotting issue.

    There isn't a rust and rotting issue if they are install correctly. Theres business units up and down the country made from the same sheeting built twenty years plus.


  • Registered Users Posts: 126 ✭✭ fatbast


    This one is 20 x 10 Scandinavian timber tongue and groove floor with flooring grade plywood over it. Metal roof anti drop lining. Warm and dry 3k all in including lighting. Fits 10 bikes.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,064 ✭✭✭✭ blade1


    Steel tech shed = No condensation. I’m in the process of buying one myself

    My neighbour told me the other day he is getting condensation in his.
    Kingspan and OSB board all over.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,553 ✭✭✭ Cork Trucker


    blade1 wrote: »
    My neighbour told me the other day he is getting condensation in his.
    Kingspan and OSB board all over.

    Really ??? Bummer!!!!! Aren’t they guaranteed for 20 years?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,553 ✭✭✭ Cork Trucker




  • Registered Users Posts: 426 ✭✭ robbie_63


    blade1 wrote: »
    My neighbour told me the other day he is getting condensation in his.
    Kingspan and OSB board all over.

    Usually that's a ventilation issue,

    Parents have a Steeltech shed 5-6 Years now and not a drop of condensation in it,
    they are a great shed if you can afford it.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,553 ✭✭✭ Cork Trucker


    robbie_63 wrote: »
    Usually that's a ventilation issue,

    Parents have a Steeltech shed 5-6 Years now and not a drop of condensation in it,
    they are a great shed if you can afford it.

    Would fitting a small heater make any difference?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,293 ✭✭✭ TheBoyConor


    A heater will probably cost you as much money in 10 years as it would have cost to build a proper shed in the first place.

    I don't get this "you can't put it on a concrete slab" business. That is nonsense. Of course you can. But you've to do it right.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,064 ✭✭✭✭ blade1


    Really ??? Bummer!!!!! Aren’t they guaranteed for 20 years?

    So he said anyway.
    robbie_63 wrote: »
    Usually that's a ventilation issue,

    Parents have a Steeltech shed 5-6 Years now and not a drop of condensation in it,
    they are a great shed if you can afford it.

    I must ask my brother if he has any problems as he has the same steeltech shed as my neighbour.
    They both have 6m X 8m.

    My own steel shed which isn't a steeltech gets very damp as well when there is a change in temp.

    I keep my bikes in a wooden shed with a 12 litre dehumidifier in it now and use the steel shed as work place instead.

    Also, an elderly gentleman up the road from me has a huge steel shed from another company whose name escapes at the moment.

    It's about 12m X 8m and at least 4m high.
    He's not happy with it as his classic Italian car collection is getting damp.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,709 ✭✭✭✭ listermint


    People pouring slabs without DPCs . Improper drainage around them and blocking off all ventilation with insulation and boards will find damp **** inside.


    Those that work drainage into their plan.

    Pour a slab with a dpc and better yet some floor insulation too.

    And put mechanical ventilation on their shed or an opening window will find the opposite and it will out last you.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,064 ✭✭✭✭ blade1


    listermint wrote: »
    People pouring slabs without DPCs . Improper drainage around them and blocking off all ventilation with insulation and boards will find damp **** inside.


    Those that work drainage into their plan.

    Pour a slab with a dpc and better yet some floor insulation too.

    And put mechanical ventilation on their shed or an opening window will find the opposite and it will out last you.

    All sheds mentioned in my post above have dpc and speaking of my shed there's loads of ventilation.


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,709 ✭✭✭✭ listermint


    blade1 wrote: »
    All sheds mentioned in my post above have dpc and speaking of my shed there's loads of ventilation.

    If there was loads of ventilation then you wouldn't have damp .

    Ventilation is inadequate which is why moisture settles on surfaces.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,064 ✭✭✭✭ blade1


    listermint wrote: »
    If there was loads of ventilation then you wouldn't have damp .

    Ventilation is inadequate which is why moisture settles on surfaces.

    I'll take the roof off and see does that help.

    Have a concrete shed and two wooden with far less ventilation and condensation is not a problem.


  • Registered Users Posts: 261 ✭✭ pegdrums


    fatbast wrote: »
    This one is 20 x 10 Scandinavian timber tongue and groove floor with flooring grade plywood over it. Metal roof anti drop lining. Warm and dry 3k all in including lighting. Fits 10 bikes.

    Nice looking shed alright. Mind me asking what company you got it from?


  • Registered Users Posts: 261 ✭✭ pegdrums



    That's a fine job indeed. I really like the rebated floor. I think that's the right term. The kinda stepped idea.

    That's what I originally wanted to do as it seems to be the most solid option. However the euro monster keeps taking monies from me so even if I was competent enough to do it myself and do it well it'd still throw the budget out of whack Id say. 10ft x 12ft x 3 inches deep would be the slab. Be a few quid no?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 261 ✭✭ pegdrums


    Breezin wrote: »
    Shed wars! :eek:

    The ply on the floor doesn't add any real height to it. I screwed it straight on. It's lower than the floor lip in the door frame.

    Nice one.

    I took some screenshots from a youtube video.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FUuHoApdxS0

    This set up would be ideal. Nice tidy job of the slab. i'm only guessing putting in the slab would be expensive. I'm not even sure how to work out how much of what I would need.


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