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New 6x weekly Rosslare - Dunkerque (France) Ferry

13

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  • Irish Times reporting freight traffic through Rosslare up 500% over the first half of January.




  • Larbre34 wrote: »
    Irish Times reporting freight traffic through Rosslare up 500% over the first half of January.

    That's the headine but the quote in the video is 500% increase TO EUROPE.

    Freight from Rosslare to UK in the same period is down by over 75%, so much that Stena have cut back to one sailing a day until volumes increase.

    If things stayed as they are (they won't) Rosslare - South Wales would not sustain it's current service, one of the routes and ships would go. That would mean a net overall reduction in capacity from the port.

    Even with a partial recovery there is still a risk of Rosslare - Wales losing one route as it has always been the most marginal of the Irish Sea corridors.

    Nobody expects the current extreme shift away from landbridge to be permanent, it is going to take some time before the freight distribution settles down.

    The shift is also magnified by the current lack of car traffic, there is nothing to suggest this market will be effected by Brexit so previous patterns are likely to return post-covid.




  • Vic_08 wrote: »

    The shift is also magnified by the current lack of car traffic, there is nothing to suggest this market will be effected by Brexit so previous patterns are likely to return post-covid.

    The fact that the WBY was built to serve the Dublin to Cherbourg route and that Stena have introduced a similar route, along with services from the Port of Cork, suggests strongly that the private vehicle market would strongly support a direct Continental alternative to the "Land-bridge" option.




  • Tabnabs wrote: »
    The fact that the WBY was built to serve the Dublin to Cherbourg route and that Stena have introduced a similar route, along with services from the Port of Cork, suggests strongly that the private vehicle market would strongly support a direct Continental alternative to the "Land-bridge" option.

    In some ways we are lucky that covid restrictions are there to remove the Private Vehicle traffic from the routes. By the look of things, we may not see the usual Easter start of season.




  • Good to see the report on the Port of Cork on the News at 1, indicating an increase in container traffic of 10% so far this year, driven by direct services from the EU continent.

    Could it be that ro-ro investment in Dublin and Rosslare, along with massive container capacity due to come on stream in Cork in the summer, will be the formula for efficient and well spread direct freight from our EU partners?

    Hopefully we will see the Government urgently progress the M11 from Oylegate and the M28 to Ringaskiddy projects now, to further and permanently remove any dependence on the land bridge.


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  • But why was none of this before Brexit? The DFDS ferry only started in Jan and was brought forward by a few weeks. Is it they thought everything was going to be grand and when it wasnt reacted?




  • You'd have to think also that Waterford would be looking at how they can tap into demand for this additional freight capacity.




  • eastie17 wrote: »
    But why was none of this before Brexit? The DFDS ferry only started in Jan and was brought forward by a few weeks. Is it they thought everything was going to be grand and when it wasnt reacted?

    Deal or no deal; it went right to the wire and it was difficult to prepare for something when that something was just so vague in any details.




  • Tabnabs wrote: »
    You'd have to think also that Waterford would be looking at how they can tap into demand for this additional freight capacity.

    Are there RO-RO facilities in Waterford? or is it container only?




  • Are there RO-RO facilities in Waterford? or is it container only?

    Lo-Lo and Cement at Bellview only. Too far upstream to attract RORO.


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  • Tabnabs wrote: »
    The fact that the WBY was built to serve the Dublin to Cherbourg route and that Stena have introduced a similar route, along with services from the Port of Cork, suggests strongly that the private vehicle market would strongly support a direct Continental alternative to the "Land-bridge" option.

    Was there ever a large market for leisure traffic to the continent via Britain? Safe to say the preference was always for direct sailings, those using the Landbridge would have been doing it for speed, a factor that will still be true post covid.

    The single weekend round trip Stena have laid on has nothing to do with leisure traffic demand to the continent, it is a temporary measure to cater for freight, taking advantage of the lower freight loads to the UK due to brexit chaos and the fact weekends are always the quietest for freight on that route. In normal times weekends on Dublin - Holyhead also see higher loads of passenger cars somewhat making up for the lower freight numbers. Jan/Feb were always the quietest months on all ferry routes, the companies used this to got away with reducing capacity and sailings to put their ships through drydock.

    Estimates publicised recently were that approx 10% of commercial Ro-Ro traffic through Dublin was destined for continental Europe, the rest was for GB. The % for cars is nowhere near as high. How much of this will permanently switch to direct sailings, how much will NI traffic switch to direct sailings from Belfast to GB and how much freight IRL-GB will be permanently lost due to Brexit are all unknowns at the moment.




  • Fully agreed Vic_08 but a few points I would consider in addition:

    - It is not entirely clear how much quicker the landbridge will be once full customs controls are in place (April, June) and traffic returns to normal levels. It is quite likely that the DFDS direct service to Dunkirk will be time competitive especially when you consider that drivers arrive on the Continent having completed their fully daily and weekly rest rest requirement and should be all set to drive for 9-10 hours (with a 45 minute break). Cherbourg is not that ideal in that regard being a good 10 hours from important markets in Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany.

    - Even if customs delays are kept short for trucks doing the landbridge (especially UK transit traffic), I can imagine it will be more difficult for cars.

    - The estimates about the % of traffic destined (or coming from) the UK is based around supply chains being being build based there. We may see this gradually change over the coming months and years with Irish companies moving to suppliers in the EU. Hauliers will likely start to backfill loads in mainland Europe (rather than the UK as pre-Brexit).




  • Vic_08 wrote: »
    Was there ever a large market for leisure traffic to the continent via Britain? Safe to say the preference was always for direct sailings, those using the Landbridge would have been doing it for speed, a factor that will still be true post covid.

    The single weekend round trip Stena have laid on has nothing to do with leisure traffic demand to the continent, it is a temporary measure to cater for freight, taking advantage of the lower freight loads to the UK due to brexit chaos and the fact weekends are always the quietest for freight on that route. In normal times weekends on Dublin - Holyhead also see higher loads of passenger cars somewhat making up for the lower freight numbers. Jan/Feb were always the quietest months on all ferry routes, the companies used this to got away with reducing capacity and sailings to put their ships through drydock.

    Estimates publicised recently were that approx 10% of commercial Ro-Ro traffic through Dublin was destined for continental Europe, the rest was for GB. The % for cars is nowhere near as high. How much of this will permanently switch to direct sailings, how much will NI traffic switch to direct sailings from Belfast to GB and how much freight IRL-GB will be permanently lost due to Brexit are all unknowns at the moment.

    If you were going to northern Europe the landbridge was quite popular. Anyone wanting to visit Holland or Belgium or the many campsites in the North of France were better served by the landbridge, as all the Ferries from Ireland went to Normandy or Brittany, forcing you to join the busy Autoroute network feeding Paris, and out the other side, and take your chances ordering food or fuel at the French motorway services, whereas the landbridge brought you a longer distance without the language gap.
    (Most French Campsites are run by the likes of keycamp etc. Language barrier not an issue.)




  • Brittany Ferries has just announced two new routes, Saint-Malo to Rosslare and Roscoff to Rosslare. The latter will be March to October.




  • I love it. I love it all.

    Hopefully if the direct to Europe routes take off and maintain healthy load factor from the freight industry, it should hopefully mean better & more competitive holiday options direct to Europe, when eventually Europe gets back to normal in a few years..




  • RadioRetro wrote: »
    Brittany Ferries has just announced two new routes, Saint-Malo to Rosslare and Roscoff to Rosslare. The latter will be March to October.

    In addition to Cork -Roscoff or instead of Cork-Roscoff?




  • That's not clear at this point. They will be freight routes.

    Will there be any tourist season this summer to support the Cork-Roscoff?




  • Dohvolle wrote: »
    In addition to Cork -Roscoff or instead of Cork-Roscoff?

    As well as the weekly Cork, this looks to be a midweek return using Armorique. No details on the Saint-Malo yet.

    These appear to be being heavily pushed by the Brittany regional government to cover delays in freight to their region.




  • Dohvolle wrote: »
    That was last year.

    Sorry about that, In too much of a hurry after the dinner.
    I'll delete it if I can.


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  • Vic_08 wrote: »
    As well as the weekly Cork, this looks to be a midweek return using Armorique. No details on the Saint-Malo yet.

    These appear to be being heavily pushed by the Brittany regional government to cover delays in freight to their region.

    My impression is that the Armorique will cover both routes, alternately, in the same fashion as Irish Ferries used to, with Rosslare-Roscoff being seasonal only.




  • Further to my earlier post about the new Brittany Ferries services between Rosslare and France, this is a tweet from a local journalist:

    "Note of caution on potential new sailings to St Malo/Roscoff from #Rosslare. Nothing confirmed yet by Brittany Ferries. The route may still go to Cork! GM of Europort Glenn Carr says that nothing agreed. Political figures hopping on the “announcement” may be premature.".




  • I wonder which wexfort political figure known to jump on bandwagon would this be




  • Dohvolle wrote: »
    I wonder which wexfort political figure known to jump on bandwagon would this be

    All of them?




  • Hot off the press:
    Brittany Ferrries introduces three new freight-only services from Ireland to France
    2nd February 2021

    Freight-Route-Map-Ireland-irish-routes-only-2021-750x500.jpg

    Company responds to demand for more direct Ireland France freight links
    Two new sailings Cork – Roscoff
    New sailing Rosslare – St Malo
    First freight only services for Ireland from Brittany Ferries
    New services to begin this week with Rosslare – St Malo sailing on Thursday
    New Cork – Roscoff service begins on Saturday

    Brittany Ferries has announced that it is introducing three new weekly freight only sailings between Ireland and France. The sailings will begin this Thursday (4th February) with a sailing between Rosslare and St Malo.

    The first of two new sailings out of Cork to Roscoff will begin this Saturday. These sailings are in addition to the current Brittany Ferries sailings out of Cork and Rosslare to both France and Spain. The new sailings are in response to demands from both Irish and French hauliers seeking a more direct route.

    Normally most lorries travelling between Ireland and France transit via the UK, using ferry services across the Irish Sea and English Channel. However, since new post-Brexit trade rules were introduced on January 1st increasing numbers of Irish and continental hauliers have been deterred from using this ‘landbridge’ due to increased customs checks and paperwork.

    Hugh Bruton, General Manager, Brittany Ferries Ireland, commented: “It’s clear that Brexit has distorted flows of trade between France and Ireland, there’s now clear and compelling demand both in Brittany and beyond to boost freight capacity direct from the region to Ireland. And Irish traders too are seeking direct links to Western France. We’re always listening to our haulier customers in order to best meet their needs and we look forward to restarting Brittany-Ireland services two months earlier than planned.”

    The new Brittany-to-Ireland sailings come in addition to an extra weekly Rosslare to Cherbourg round trip which was introduced in mid-January. This means that from February Brittany Ferries will offer hauliers a choice of eight sailings a week in each direction between Ireland and France.

    The company also offers two weekly roundtrips between Rosslare and Bilbao, northern Spain. Altogether the company will be offering 12 sailings a week linking Ireland with France and Spain.

    Conor Mowlds, Chief Commercial Officer, Port of Cork said: “The decision by Brittany Ferries to operate two freight only services from Cork to St Malo and Roscoff is hugely positive for Cork. Importers and exporters now have further transport options to get their freight direct to the EU and bypass the UK Land-Bridge. This announcement comes in the same month as we announced a second freight service from Cork to Zeebrugge. These direct freight services from Cork to the EU strengthen the region by offering more flexibility to Irish customers, ensuring supply chains are maintained. Our relationship with Brittany Ferries spans over 40 years and it continues to go from strength to strength. We wish them every success with this freight service.”

    Glenn Carr, General Manager, Rosslare Europort adds: “The continuing commitment of Brittany Ferries to develop new services linking Irish industry to the European continent is once again demonstrated with this new service connecting to St Malo and Roscoff. We have worked closely with Brittany Ferries to facilitate this new service, which will give further choice and capacity alongside existing Brittany Ferries services between Rosslare Europort and Bilbao and Cherbourg.”

    The extra sailings starting 4th February will operate to the following timetable, initially until 21st March when regular Roscoff/Cork sailings are scheduled to resume:
    Day Departure Time Arrival Time
    Monday Depart Roscoff 20:00 Arrive Cork 14:00 next day
    Tuesday Depart Cork 20:00 Arrive Roscoff 14:00 next day
    Wednesday Depart Roscoff 20:00 Arrive Rosslare 14:00 next day
    Thursday Depart Rosslare 20:00 Arrive St Malo 17:10 next day
    Friday Depart St Malo 20:00 Arrive Cork 15:00 next day
    Saturday Depart Cork 18:00 Arrive Roscoff 12:40 next day

    (Timetables are subject to weekly variation and change at short notice)

    These new freight only routes will operate until the end of March, when scheduled freight and passenger services will resume between Cork and Roscoff. With two weekly sailings in each direction, frequency has been doubled for 2021.
    https://brittanyferriesnewsroom.com/brittany-ferrries-introduces-three-new-freight-only-services-from-ireland-to-france/




  • Dohvolle wrote: »


    It is the same publication, that paper used to be The Evening Echo which used to be an afternoon publication with a basic updated copy of what was printed in that mornings Examiner.


    What i find interesting is that Eventhough Ringaskiddy is further to the west than Rosslare, the sailing times are very similiar.




  • kub wrote: »
    What i find interesting is that Eventhough Ringaskiddy is further to the west than Rosslare, the sailing times are very similiar.

    The Rosslare run has a long deviation to clear Lands End. Cork is a more direct sailing in that regards.




  • kub wrote: »
    It is the same publication, that paper used to be The Evening Echo which used to be an afternoon publication with a basic updated copy of what was printed in that mornings Examiner.


    What i find interesting is that Eventhough Ringaskiddy is further to the west than Rosslare, the sailing times are very similiar.

    Only in the County. That was in the shops when the city issue was only just coming off the printing press.
    Now the echo is the Cork newspaper,(Like the hedald, only for Cork) as the Examiner pushes itself as a national newspaper, having dropped "Cork" from it's title some years ago.


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  • Tabnabs wrote: »
    The Rosslare run has a long deviation to clear Lands End. Cork is a more direct sailing in that regards.

    Not half as bumpy either. Lands end can be nasty depending on conditions. Cornwall can shelter you from a lot, but once you pass it you are exposed to everything the Atlantic is throwing at you, in relatively shallow water.


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