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Dark Chocolate recommendation - made in Ireland?

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  • 23-10-2020 9:30pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,275 ✭✭✭


    Anyone recommend quality dark chocolate made in Ireland?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 29,085 ✭✭✭✭odyssey06


    Butlers or Skelligs.

    Think Brown Thomas stock Skelligs.

    "To follow knowledge like a sinking star..." (Tennyson's Ulysses)



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,330 ✭✭✭phormium


    Bean and Goose, yum


  • Registered Users, Subscribers Posts: 47,295 ✭✭✭✭Zaph


    Hazel Mountain


  • Posts: 8,856 ✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    odyssey06 wrote: »
    Butlers or Skelligs.

    Think Brown Thomas stock Skelligs.

    Skelligs for either eating cooking or hot chocolate FTW

    It’s beautiful, delicious and they deliver direct

    I’ve ordered a number of times, most recently in the last week

    https://skelligschocolate.com/


  • Registered Users Posts: 29,085 ✭✭✭✭odyssey06


    Skelligs for either eating cooking or hot chocolate FTW
    It’s beautiful, delicious and they deliver direct
    I’ve ordered a number of times, most recently in the last week
    https://skelligschocolate.com/

    Didnt realise they delivered. Tempting.

    The dark choc whiskey truffles are sensational.

    "To follow knowledge like a sinking star..." (Tennyson's Ulysses)



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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,275 ✭✭✭august12


    Which has the least number of additives, I notice this term 'dutching' i.e. processed with alkali which reduces dark chocolate's flavanol content.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,275 ✭✭✭august12


    phormium wrote: »
    Bean and Goose, yum
    Any recommendation of a particular type, the higher the percentage of dark chocolate, the less additives and sweeteners. I have tried 100 % dark chocolate and won't be going there again, 85 seems to be my tolerance level.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,548 ✭✭✭Hoboo


    august12 wrote: »
    Any recommendation of a particular type, the higher the percentage of dark chocolate, the less additives and sweeteners. I have tried 100 % dark chocolate and won't be going there again, 85 seems to be my tolerance level.

    100% agree. Just had a look at skellig and a sugar free dark chocolate is 54%, but loaded with sweetener which isn't ideal. Prefer a small bit of sugar than that.

    There are some extra dark chocolate drops with sugar, 72%, 100g for €2.50. 20 packs to get free delivery. Lovely.


  • Registered Users Posts: 22 _Fluffy_


    On a related note, I like Nobó chocolate, which is made in Ireland, and, as the name suggests, vegan. Even better, it is free of refined sugar, which is why I eat it. Ingredients include cashew butter and coconut sugar I think. They also make ice cream, yet to try it... https://www.nobo.ie/collections/dairy-free-chocolate

    I’ve been meaning to try Magic Mayan chocolate, also made in Ireland, just haven’t got around to it: https://www.magicmayan.com/

    Again, they use coconut sugar which is why I’d want to try it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,330 ✭✭✭phormium


    I used to eat lots of the Lidl 74% dark choc, very nice, but that is as far as I'd go, would eat 80% at a push but perfect for baking.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,482 ✭✭✭caviardreams


    _Fluffy_ wrote: »

    I’ve been meaning to try Magic Mayan chocolate, also made in Ireland, just haven’t got around to it: https://www.magicmayan.com/

    Again, they use coconut sugar which is why I’d want to try it.

    I've tried the Magic Mayan - I just don't get on with raw chocolate to be honest. It's the texture and mouthfeel - just feels gritty. If you are into Raw chocolate it might be lovely though!

    Would also mention Milsean's 80% - really smooth and nice https://milsean.ie/

    Wilde Irish chocolate are decent too - I don't find skelligs great but I am an 85-100% cacao type so not one for truffles and milk bars, hence a lot more fussy! I think you really notice the quality of the beans at much higher %s.

    Proper Chocolate company - expensive but nice for a treat: https://properchocolatecompany.com/

    I found hazel mountain chocolate very underwhelming (but again, this was only based on their higher % range, and most people rave about their hot chocolate etc.)


    Wilkies do a nice selection up to 89% (used to do 99% too I think) https://www.wilkieschocolate.ie/

    Exploding Tree in Cork do some nice flavours if that is your vibe: https://explodingtree.com/

    NearyNógs in Armagh too - https://www.nearynogs.com/collections/chocolate-bars

    I don't think O'Conaillls in Cork sell online anywhere - but if you are down that way that would be an option too


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,726 ✭✭✭jam_mac_jam


    I would second the proper chocolate company recommended. Absolutely delicious chocolate. Expensive but good quality.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,915 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    On the coconut sugar ; is that not just sugar made from coconut rather than cane or beet?
    Is it actually less processed?


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,261 ✭✭✭✭leahyl


    Danero chocolate from Cork is lovely - they had a lovely small shop at the end of South Main Street for a while a few years ago but unfortunately closed it. They still sell at various farmers markets in the city and have a website - https://www.danerocorkchocolate.ie/collections/bars
    I’m gonna be buying from them for Christmas for gifts and for myself :-P


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,548 ✭✭✭Hoboo


    I've tried the Magic Mayan - I just don't get on with raw chocolate to be honest. It's the texture and mouthfeel - just feels gritty. If you are into Raw chocolate it might be lovely though!

    Would also mention Milsean's 80% - really smooth and nice https://milsean.ie/

    Wilde Irish chocolate are decent too - I don't find skelligs great but I am an 85-100% cacao type so not one for truffles and milk bars, hence a lot more fussy! I think you really notice the quality of the beans at much higher %s.

    Proper Chocolate company - expensive but nice for a treat: https://properchocolatecompany.com/

    I found hazel mountain chocolate very underwhelming (but again, this was only based on their higher % range, and most people rave about their hot chocolate etc.)


    Wilkies do a nice selection up to 89% (used to do 99% too I think) https://www.wilkieschocolate.ie/

    Exploding Tree in Cork do some nice flavours if that is your vibe: https://explodingtree.com/

    NearyNógs in Armagh too - https://www.nearynogs.com/collections/chocolate-bars

    I don't think O'Conaillls in Cork sell online anywhere - but if you are down that way that would be an option too

    Close thread :). Thanks for all the info, I'll give them all a whirl. 4 pieces of the good stuff and 8 brazil nuts a night. Sorted.


  • Registered Users Posts: 22 _Fluffy_


    On the coconut sugar ; is that not just sugar made from coconut rather than cane or beet?
    Is it actually less processed?

    You're right there, I doubt it is a much healthier option. I don't eat cane sugar or artificial sweeteners so chocolate made with coconut sugar is such a treat!


    This is a brilliant thread! Thanks for the long list Caviardreams.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,275 ✭✭✭august12


    I've tried the Magic Mayan - I just don't get on with raw chocolate to be honest. It's the texture and mouthfeel - just feels gritty. If you are into Raw chocolate it might be lovely though!

    Would also mention Milsean's 80% - really smooth and nice https://milsean.ie/

    Wilde Irish chocolate are decent too - I don't find skelligs great but I am an 85-100% cacao type so not one for truffles and milk bars, hence a lot more fussy! I think you really notice the quality of the beans at much higher %s.

    Proper Chocolate company - expensive but nice for a treat: https://properchocolatecompany.com/

    I found hazel mountain chocolate very underwhelming (but again, this was only based on their higher % range, and most people rave about their hot chocolate etc.)


    Wilkies do a nice selection up to 89% (used to do 99% too I think) https://www.wilkieschocolate.ie/

    Exploding Tree in Cork do some nice flavours if that is your vibe: https://explodingtree.com/

    NearyNógs in Armagh too - https://www.nearynogs.com/collections/chocolate-bars

    I don't think O'Conaillls in Cork sell online anywhere - but if you are down that way that would be an option too
    There is a chocolate company in the english market in cork, chocolate.ie, they sell numerous brands , all imported I think, I have tried skelligs and not a fan either, wilde's is located near me and have tried, I like the Lindt 85, it's not Irish , I will check out some of the above suggestions, thanks to all for replying.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17 meggiemegmeg


    Brona chocolate from Cork is amazing. The beara sea salt dark chocolate one. They deliver too. I currently have 15 bars in my press. But I do not have a problem. Well. Not really anyway. /bronachocolates.com/products/beara-sea-salt-dark


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,915 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    I notice that a lot of these artisan producers seem to be a bit shy about listing the weight of their products.
    Some of these chocolate bars are staggeringly expensive compared to good quality alternatives.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,482 ✭✭✭caviardreams


    I would say that bean to bar small batch processing is a lot more labour intensive and expensive (especially if using top quality beans that are single origin) than the chocolatiers who just buy in the processed product in bulk and and flavouring or make into bars etc.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 16,915 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    I would say that bean to bar small batch processing is a lot more labour intensive and expensive (especially if using top quality beans that are single origin) than the chocolatiers who just buy in the processed product in bulk and and flavouring or make into bars etc.

    How many Irish producers are actually making the chocolate themselves?


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,440 ✭✭✭Markcheese


    How many Irish producers are actually making the chocolate themselves?

    Not many ... Most are buying in chocolate from somewhere like begium ,and melting it ...
    As someone above was saying bean to bar on a small scale is gonna be expensive ...

    Slava ukraini 🇺🇦



  • Registered Users Posts: 22 _Fluffy_


    Markcheese wrote: »
    Not many ... Most are buying in chocolate from somewhere like begium ,and melting it ...

    I'm a bit shocked by that, I thought these brands of Irish chocolate were all really made here.

    On a happier note, I saw something on Nationwide about this ages ago:
    https://www.kylemoreabbey.com/product-category/kylemore-abbey-handmade-chocolates/

    I wonder if these sheep taste nice: https://www.kylemoreabbey.com/product/flock-sheep-milk/


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,726 ✭✭✭jam_mac_jam


    The proper chocolate company is bean to bar.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,275 ✭✭✭august12




  • Registered Users Posts: 3,817 ✭✭✭Darc19


    In terms of local irish chocolate, skelligs and chez Emily (Ashbourne/coolquay) are my favorites.

    In terms of stupidly good value, check a Mr Price store - 2 weeks ago I got Godiva 300g slab dark with almonds (also hazelnut) for €2.

    That was in portlaoise, but I presume elsewhere.

    Normally sold in duty-free at £12.
    72% dark, 100% delicious.

    BTW, I don't think any chocolate is "made" in Ireland. Most premium chocolate is brought in from different Belgium producers and then transformed into various styles. The higher the chocolate content, the lower the input of the Irish end.

    Where Irish chocolate wins is the mix with Irish milk for a luxurious milk chocolate.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,915 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    Darc19 wrote: »

    BTW, I don't think any chocolate is "made" in Ireland. Most premium chocolate is brought in from different Belgium producers and then transformed into various styles.

    I'm pretty sure that this is no longer the case but it's hard to know who is actually making the chocolate.


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