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History on the Farm

  • 22-10-2020 10:39am
    #1
    Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 79 ✭✭


    Found this buried in a mound of earth last year. I'm wondering what it is and how old. I initially thought the numbers on the bottom are a date 1807 but now I'm not sure.
    plough.jpg


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Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 994 ✭✭✭NcdJd


    ChuckieEgg wrote: »
    Found this buried in a mound of earth last year. I'm wondering what it is and how old. I initially thought the numbers on the bottom are a date 1807 but now I'm not sure.
    R9MH5SS
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/e8ww3yrm9v6s6p6/20201021_104930.jpg?dl=0

    Interesting to find out what that is. Found a large medal which I still have, father brought it into the national museum and they were able to tell use what it was produced for. You might be able to just send in a photo and ask if they know what it is.

    Although you might get an answer from some knowledgeable person on here :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 20,968 ✭✭✭✭Water John


    Looks like a fire iron. You put it into the fire, when hot you took it out and slipped it into the iron for ironing clothes.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,821 ✭✭✭✭Say my name


    Water John wrote: »
    Looks like a fire iron. You put it into the fire, when hot you took it out and slipped it into the iron for ironing clothes.

    In the land of giants! :D

    Use the concrete blocks it's beside in the gate pier as a size comparison.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 994 ✭✭✭NcdJd


    Is that a harp on it ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,821 ✭✭✭✭Say my name


    ChuckieEgg wrote: »
    Found this buried in a mound of earth last year. I'm wondering what it is and how old. I initially thought the numbers on the bottom are a date 1807 but now I'm not sure.
    plough.jpg

    It looks to be 1807 and a harp.

    After that and it's significance and use?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 10,821 ✭✭✭✭Say my name


    NcdJd wrote: »
    Is that a harp on it ?

    Great minds..


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,148 ✭✭✭amadangomor


    What part of the country are you in Chuckie?

    Imagination going on that. Harp represents Ireland so maybe used by some secret Irish Nationaist society?

    Maybe post in archeology forum for more input.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 994 ✭✭✭NcdJd


    Great minds..

    Maybe my eyes are a bit bonkers but if you look at the hole near the pointy end does it look to have a circular ware on it out from the hole ? Like there was something circular against it and this was turned.

    Probably eyes are playing tricks on me. But if you look at the photo from a distance.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,821 ✭✭✭✭Say my name


    NcdJd wrote: »
    Maybe my eyes are a bit bonkers but if you look at the hole near the pointy end does it look to have a circular ware on it out from the hole ? Like there was something circular against it and this was turned.

    Probably eyes are playing tricks on me. But if you look at the photo from a distance.

    How far of a distance are we talking here? :pac:

    Ah there was something in it. And sure then if it goes the whole way through or not?
    And then there's another hole above the numbers.
    And that 8 looks dodgy enough. Like it was a 9 made into an 8.
    And looks to be in limestone or sandstone.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 994 ✭✭✭NcdJd


    How far of a distance are we talking here? :pac:

    Ah there was something in it. And sure then if it goes the whole way through or not?
    And then there's another hole above the numbers.
    And that 8 looks dodgy enough. Like it was a 9 made into an 8.
    And looks to be in limestone.

    Ancient star trek badge so ha


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  • Registered Users Posts: 10,821 ✭✭✭✭Say my name


    NcdJd wrote: »
    Ancient star trek badge so ha

    Commemorating the theft of the Irish Crown jewels. :)

    It's like something someone would do when a house is built.


  • Registered Users Posts: 463 ✭✭Testacalda


    Have seen some similar things on farms before, not exactly like that but the same basic size and shape.

    Supposedly they were used to keep down weeds or maybe to help compact soil between drills, pulled with a horse, hence the hole in the top for the rope. The arrow shape helped it stay on course as it was being pulled.

    The hole on the other end was where the handle would have been fitted.

    Was common that these were made by the farmer on the farm, generally left at the edge of a field when not in use.

    Is there any wear marks on the bottem?


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 79 ✭✭ChuckieEgg


    Testacalda wrote: »
    Have seen some similar things on farms before, not exactly like that but the same basic size and shape.

    Supposedly they were used to keep down weeds or maybe to help compact soil between drills, pulled with a horse, hence the hole in the top for the rope. The arrow shape helped it stay on course as it was being pulled.

    The hole on the other end was where the handle would have been fitted.

    Was common that these were made by the farmer on the farm, generally left at the edge of a field when not in use.

    Is there any wear marks on the bottem?

    I was thinking it was some sort of plough. Two holes one at each end.
    Definitely not a clothes Iron!!!
    No real wear marks on it from what I can tell. I'm in west Clare and the ground is fierce muddy around me so its hard to believe that people once ploughed the place.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 994 ✭✭✭NcdJd


    ChuckieEgg wrote: »
    I was thinking it was some sort of plough. Two holes one at each end.
    Definitely not a clothes Iron!!!
    No real wear marks on it from what I can tell. I'm in west Clare and the ground is fierce muddy around me so its hard to believe that people once ploughed the place.

    Don't think it's for a plough if there's no wear marks.. Unless some sort of weight. Why would someone have engraved a date and harp if it was attached to a plough.

    Also if it was going along the ground that wouldn't last long until it would have cracked at the hole on the bottom if it hit a large stone ?


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 186 ✭✭Kickstart1.3


    The 1807 doesn't really look like a date. I wonder is it Ogham?
    Might be worth asking someone in the Dept of Heritage to look at it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,797 ✭✭✭Dickie10


    i have dead bodies on my land but i dont want to tell anyone, but at same time im a bit nosy as to why they are there.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,148 ✭✭✭amadangomor


    The 1807 doesn't really look like a date. I wonder is it Ogham?
    Might be worth asking someone in the Dept of Heritage to look at it.

    looking at it more closely it looks more like 1907 to me. Definitely not Ogham


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 186 ✭✭Kickstart1.3


    you could be right. It looks upside-down. Strange looking stone though


  • Registered Users Posts: 840 ✭✭✭gk5000


    Could it be a symbolic or keystone to hold down a piece of thatch?


  • Registered Users Posts: 830 ✭✭✭satstheway


    Is it a jug or a harp on it


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  • Registered Users Posts: 363 ✭✭Tig98


    Bit of a stretch, but...

    Maybe it is what it depicts? One stick in one hole threaded with horse hair or whatever and they're fed through the hole on the other end. Ending up with a harp prototype of sorts. Interesting find all the same


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 186 ✭✭Kickstart1.3


    A jug!!
    I'd say whoever did the drawing Art wasn't his strongest subject


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,545 ✭✭✭✭patsy_mccabe


    gk5000 wrote: »
    Could it be a symbolic or keystone to hold down a piece of thatch?

    This is what I thought - a weight for end of a rope used to hold down a cock of hay or thatch on a roof.

    'The Bishops blessed the Blueshirts in Galway, As they sailed beneath the Swastika to Spain'



  • Closed Accounts Posts: 994 ✭✭✭NcdJd


    A jug!!
    I'd say whoever did the drawing Art wasn't his strongest subject

    Some lad named Lobi


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 186 ✭✭Kickstart1.3


    NcdJd wrote: »
    Some lad named Lobi
    I think once Lobi failed as an artist his next job was on the Slean
    :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,118 ✭✭✭Melanchthon


    Testacalda wrote: »
    Have seen some similar things on farms before, not exactly like that but the same basic size and shape.

    Supposedly they were used to keep down weeds or maybe to help compact soil between drills, pulled with a horse, hence the hole in the top for the rope. The arrow shape helped it stay on course as it was being pulled.

    The hole on the other end was where the handle would have been fitted.

    Was common that these were made by the farmer on the farm, generally left at the edge of a field when not in use.

    Is there any wear marks on the bottem?

    Looks right and date would fit

    http://irisharchaeology.ie/2019/02/traditional-irish-farming-tools-drill-drag-stones/


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 685 ✭✭✭keepalive213


    Most definitely a small headstone. But probably a mini plow


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,996 ✭✭✭✭gozunda


    ChuckieEgg wrote: »
    Found this buried in a mound of earth last year. I'm wondering what it is and how old. I initially thought the numbers on the bottom are a date 1807 but now I'm not sure.
    plough.jpg

    The first thing I thought of was it a trigonometry marker of some type or a bench mark stone for land surveing?


    They usually use a Triangle and a reference number Indicating height ASL and are marked on maps thus.

    https://i.imgflip.com/4jia4v.jpg

    Possibly an old one from a private land survey - done by landlords to map their estates and land holdings

    What are the dimensions of the stone btw?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,543 ✭✭✭mayota


    Testacalda wrote: »
    Have seen some similar things on farms before, not exactly like that but the same basic size and shape.

    Supposedly they were used to keep down weeds or maybe to help compact soil between drills, pulled with a horse, hence the hole in the top for the rope. The arrow shape helped it stay on course as it was being pulled.

    The hole on the other end was where the handle would have been fitted.

    Was common that these were made by the farmer on the farm, generally left at the edge of a field when not in use.

    Is there any wear marks on the bottem?

    I found this one a few years ago on the farm here, Dad said it is a pull stone.Its roughly 36” x 16”.


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  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 12,550 Mod ✭✭✭✭blue5000


    Testacalda wrote: »
    Have seen some similar things on farms before, not exactly like that but the same basic size and shape.

    Supposedly they were used to keep down weeds or maybe to help compact soil between drills, pulled with a horse, hence the hole in the top for the rope. The arrow shape helped it stay on course as it was being pulled.

    The hole on the other end was where the handle would have been fitted.

    Was common that these were made by the farmer on the farm, generally left at the edge of a field when not in use.

    Is there any wear marks on the bottem?

    I'd go along with this too. I've heard of them called a drill stone, they were dragged by a horse to make potato drills.

    If the seat's wet, sit on yer hat, a cool head is better than a wet ar5e.



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