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Are many people being overly self indulgent in terms of the depression/gloom?

  • 18-10-2020 3:22pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 4,206 ✭✭✭ Cluedo Monopoly


    Obviously there are many many people who are being heavily impacted by Covid19 and it cannot be easy for those people. Financial impacts, Services impacts, Healthcare impacts, Employment impacts, Bereavement etc.

    But it strikes me that many other people have been relatively unaffected and yet are being overly self indulgent on the depression/gloom stakes and woe-is-me rhetoric. Especially on social media. They are showing a distinct lack of resilience and fortitude.

    The media and George Lee types are certainly selling the wartime-like doom and gloom and maybe many people have bought into that a bit too much even if it's not always warranted. Others have nearly welcomed the new slower way of life but probably wont admit it.

    I listened to someone the other day saying he was really annoyed that he couldn't go to the cinema anymore. That he really missed it. Giving out about the Bond movie being pushed out to 2021 etc. Maybe that would have been a major lifestyle change in times gone by but now people have massive TVs and Netflix and Sky and whatever else. And you can buy popcorn anywhere. It's not the end of the world.

    Others were bemoaning the restaurants closing and yet they can order Italian, Indian, Chinese, Burger/Chips from more outlets than ever.

    Soon people will be panicking about the retail shops closing when they can satisfy their consumerism online. I am not sure those same people have much empathy for the business owners or their staff who are taking the real hit. No retail therapy for them.

    I guess for those people that kept their jobs (and possibly the luxury of work-from-home) and their family members are healthy/safe, there really shouldn't be much to get down about.


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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 5,423 ✭✭✭ Berties_Horse


    NPHET are being overly self-indulgent, not a chance one single member will find ever themselves compromised on the PUP. While they inflict hundreds of thousands of involuntary job losses. There are also a few corners of the public sector that are untouchable. The rest of us are forced to scramble by.

    And I have little sympathy for the whinge baskets who can work from home with salaries unimpacted.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,644 ✭✭✭✭ snoopsheep


    Many people are overly self indulgent in any circumstances.

    It's just now they are all focused on covid.

    Remember when everyone was happy and getting on with things before 2020?

    Yeah, me neither.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,644 ✭✭✭✭ snoopsheep


    NPHET are being overly self-indulgent, not a chance one single member will find ever themselves compromised on the PUP. While they inflict hundreds of thousands of involuntary job losses. There are also a few corners of the public sector that are untouchable. The rest of us are forced to scramble by.

    You understand that covid is an actual thing that has happened to the world, right?

    It wasn't invented by our public health body to upset you


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 22,676 ✭✭✭✭ beauf


    Obviously there are many many people who are being heavily impacted by Covid19 and it cannot be easy for those people. Financial impacts, Services impacts, Healthcare impacts, Employment impacts, Bereavement etc.

    ....

    I guess for those people that kept their jobs (and possibly the luxury of work-from-home) and their family members are healthy/safe, there really shouldn't be much to get down about.

    Some people are more effected by the lack of social contact than others. Especially older people, though it can be at any age. They are basically depressed.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,206 ✭✭✭ Cluedo Monopoly


    beauf wrote: »
    Some people are more effected by the lack of social contact than others. Especially older people, though it can be at any age. They are basically depressed.

    Yes you are right. I know this to be true. I think many people are doing their best to help older people by calling to chat to them (outside & distanced obviously) and dropping in shopping etc. Especially in rural areas.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 31,701 ✭✭✭✭ is_that_so


    beauf wrote: »
    Some people are more effected by the lack of social contact than others. Especially older people, though it can be at any age. They are basically depressed.
    Chatting to someone who works in a care home, a few weeks back and they said that a lot of the residents were depressed.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,706 ✭✭✭✭ Kermit.de.frog


    is_that_so wrote: »
    Chatting to someone who works in a care home, a few weeks back and they said that a lot of the residents were depressed.

    We are in the middle of a pandemic where older people are particularly vulnerable.

    The only way to protect them is restrict visits.

    There is no other way. So your point about depression is moot. All that can be done is keep them as comfortable and active as possible.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,692 ✭✭✭ Loueze


    I kept my job and can work from home, but I lost my mother. If given a choice, I know which I would rather have lost.

    I am sorry and have sympathy for those who have lost jobs / income. But they are receiving financial help and new jobs will be found. The economy will recover.

    I guess it depends on your perspective. Burying someone you love before their time and not allowed to have a proper funeral to see them on their way will colour your perspective.

    The thing that is depressing me is other people's lax attitude towards Covid, usually by those who believe themselves invulnerable to it or that its "just a mild flu."

    Some one mentioned people n care homes being depressed, of course they are. Because they can't see their loved ones, and why not? Because of other people being irresponsible idiots who think they can do what they like and ignore the restrictions. Refuse to wear masks.

    I cried my eyes out when I heard of the deaths in a nursing home this week. These people are thee most vulnerable of all, and I don't care if some people think "oh, they're going to die soon anyway" that their lives are worth gambling with for the sake of saving jobs.

    Probably some ****wit who'd been at a houseparty the weekend before then visited a relative who carried Covid back into that nursing home.


  • Registered Users Posts: 31,701 ✭✭✭✭ is_that_so


    We are in the middle of a pandemic where older people are particularly vulnerable.

    The only way to protect them is restrict visits.

    There is no other way. So your point about depression is moot. All that can be done is keep them as comfortable and active as possible.
    Aye, wait till you get to that point so they can make you feel comfortable. What an utterly crass condescending post!


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,706 ✭✭✭✭ Kermit.de.frog


    is_that_so wrote: »
    Aye, wait till you get to that point so they can make you feel comfortable. What an utterly crass condescending post!

    Well, what's your solution then? Just keep visits going is it?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,981 ✭✭✭ pgj2015


    Well, what's your solution then? Just keep visits going is it?



    what about let them visit and chat behind a perspex window?


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,706 ✭✭✭✭ Kermit.de.frog


    pgj2015 wrote: »
    what about let them visit and chat behind a perspex window?

    Aren't some already doing that?

    The question is whether that is also a risk too far for something that will go through a nursing home like wildfire in the context of how rampant the virus now is in the community. The health professionals are best placed to decide that. People should wait and see what they decide.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,981 ✭✭✭ pgj2015


    Aren't some already doing that?

    The question is whether that is also a risk too far for something that will go through a nursing home like wildfire in the context of how rampant the virus now is in the community. The health professionals are best placed to decide that. People should wait and see what they decide.



    im not sure if they are or not to be honest.

    you would imagine it could be done safely.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 146 ✭✭ salamiii


    Of the cases notified today:
    651 are women / 628 are men
    68% are under 45 years of age
    The median age is 31 years old
    The counties with the highest cases are:
    408 in Dublin
    156 in Cork
    88 in Kildare
    80 in Meath
    55 in Limerick
    the remaining 496 cases are spread across 21 counties.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,981 ✭✭✭ pgj2015


    salamiii wrote: »
    Of the cases notified today:
    651 are women / 628 are men
    68% are under 45 years of age
    The median age is 31 years old
    The counties with the highest cases are:
    408 in Dublin
    156 in Cork
    88 in Kildare
    80 in Meath
    55 in Limerick
    the remaining 496 cases are spread across 21 counties.



    What has that got to do with this thread?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,114 ✭✭✭ Ellie2008


    I realise it’s a first world problem but WFH is not all it’s cracked up to be. I find my job hugely stressful & hate that I can’t see my team in person to talk through points. I also at times feel very lonely.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 22,676 ✭✭✭✭ beauf


    pgj2015 wrote: »
    What has that got to do with this thread?

    I assume the implication is people in that 68% will bring it into their parents and relations, and older neighbours. Not that there was any need to be cryptic about it.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 22,676 ✭✭✭✭ beauf


    Ellie2008 wrote: »
    I realise it’s a first world problem but WFH is not all it’s cracked up to be. I find my job hugely stressful & hate that I can’t see my team in person to talk through points. I also at times feel very lonely.

    That also an issue for many. I think its mistake to under estimate the impact.


  • Registered Users Posts: 353 ✭✭ eastie17


    beauf wrote: »
    That also an issue for many. I think its mistake to under estimate the impact.
    Plus there’s a bit of an element of being trapped where ever u are, very difficult to even consider moving to a different job as long as covid is around


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,535 ✭✭✭✭ Sardonicat


    We are in the middle of a pandemic where older people are particularly vulnerable.

    The only way to protect them is restrict visits.

    There is no other way. So your point about depression is moot. All that can be done is keep them as comfortable and active as possible.

    Gotta agree with this. Though I can understand how unbearable it must be for someone in a nursing home who is still lucid but frail enough to require nursing home care wondering if they will outlive this pandemic and get to touch their children and grandchildren, see their remaining siblings etc. It really is devastating for them.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,130 ✭✭✭ Rodin


    Obviously there are many many people who are being heavily impacted by Covid19 and it cannot be easy for those people. Financial impacts, Services impacts, Healthcare impacts, Employment impacts, Bereavement etc.

    But it strikes me that many other people have been relatively unaffected and yet are being overly self indulgent on the depression/gloom stakes and woe-is-me rhetoric. Especially on social media. They are showing a distinct lack of resilience and fortitude.

    The media and George Lee types are certainly selling the wartime-like doom and gloom and maybe many people have bought into that a bit too much even if it's not always warranted. Others have nearly welcomed the new slower way of life but probably wont admit it.

    I listened to someone the other day saying he was really annoyed that he couldn't go to the cinema anymore. That he really missed it. Giving out about the Bond movie being pushed out to 2021 etc. Maybe that would have been a major lifestyle change in times gone by but now people have massive TVs and Netflix and Sky and whatever else. And you can buy popcorn anywhere. It's not the end of the world.

    Others were bemoaning the restaurants closing and yet they can order Italian, Indian, Chinese, Burger/Chips from more outlets than ever.

    Soon people will be panicking about the retail shops closing when they can satisfy their consumerism online. I am not sure those same people have much empathy for the business owners or their staff who are taking the real hit. No retail therapy for them.

    I guess for those people that kept their jobs (and possibly the luxury of work-from-home) and their family members are healthy/safe, there really shouldn't be much to get down about.

    "Anxiety" is cool these days...

    People need to toughen up. We indulge them too much.
    The anxious should go to a 3rd world country for a bit of perspective


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,114 ✭✭✭ Ellie2008


    Rodin wrote: »
    "Anxiety" is cool these days...

    People need to toughen up. We indulge them too much.
    The anxious should go to a 3rd world country for a bit of perspective

    I’ve suffered from anxiety for years, there’s nothing cool about it, it’s destroyed my life & negatively impacted those around me.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,206 ✭✭✭ Cluedo Monopoly


    Ellie2008 wrote: »
    I realise it’s a first world problem but WFH is not all it’s cracked up to be. I find my job hugely stressful & hate that I can’t see my team in person to talk through points. I also at times feel very lonely.

    It' s a fair point. I don't know anything about you but I would recommend leaving your job if you find it very stressful. Maybe not during covid but as soon as you can. Stress can have major health impacts if not addressed. And health is wealth.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,641 ✭✭✭ mohawk


    Ellie2008 wrote: »
    I realise it’s a first world problem but WFH is not all it’s cracked up to be. I find my job hugely stressful & hate that I can’t see my team in person to talk through points. I also at times feel very lonely.

    I won’t dismiss it as a first world problem completely because loneliness is not good for your health. Some health experts have said it’s as bad as smoking 20 cigarettes a day.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,519 ✭✭✭✭ rob316


    Rodin wrote: »
    "Anxiety" is cool these days...

    People need to toughen up. We indulge them too much.
    The anxious should go to a 3rd world country for a bit of perspective

    It ain't cool I've suffered with it my whole life and it's rife in my family. Don't be acting the internet hardman


  • Registered Users Posts: 982 ✭✭✭ Rrrrrr2


    Rodin wrote: »
    "Anxiety" is cool these days...

    People need to toughen up. We indulge them too much.
    The anxious should go to a 3rd world country for a bit of perspective

    Don’t worry with the way this ****eshow is going “The anxious” won’t even have to leave to get it


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,590 ✭✭✭ screamer


    I find Irish people are more drawn to misery than optimism generally. There are exceptions but few and far between. A lot of people only love to bitch and moan and complain about things, they’d never think how can I change something for the better, and these types of people bring everyone around them down.
    Now I will concede, this whole covid19 thing has been hard on us all. 2020 has been a horrible year, devoid of normality, and it just seems to trundle on.
    There are definitely people whose mental health has suffered and continues to, and I can only imagine how much harder it is for them.
    Still, personally I get on with things. I get a bit down in myself that there’s no end in sight yet, but I take comfort that I haven’t been very badly affected by it. I don’t really care about loneliness as I’ve my kids and family, and I just keep trying to do my best to protect us from covid, and I keep in mind, we’ll get through this, it will end, we just have to hang in there.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,927 ✭✭✭✭ osarusan


    screamer wrote: »
    I find Irish people are more drawn to misery than optimism generally.


    "Being Irish, he had an abiding sense of tragedy which sustained him through temporary periods of joy.'' (WB Yeats)


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,981 ✭✭✭ pgj2015


    Ellie2008 wrote: »
    I realise it’s a first world problem but WFH is not all it’s cracked up to be. I find my job hugely stressful & hate that I can’t see my team in person to talk through points. I also at times feel very lonely.



    The way to look at it is there are people who have it way tougher than you.

    I just saw a youtube video about a prisoner who has been locked up since 1974.

    https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/britains-most-dangerous-prisoner-entombed-22559359


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  • Registered Users Posts: 21,706 ✭✭✭✭ Kermit.de.frog


    Sardonicat wrote: »
    Gotta agree with this. Though I can understand how unbearable it must be for someone in a nursing home who is still lucid but frail enough to require nursing home care wondering if they will outlive this pandemic and get to touch their children and grandchildren, see their remaining siblings etc. It really is devastating for them.

    Yes, it is very hard on them. It's a very unfortunate situation.

    There are no other options to protect nursing homes other than restrict visits.

    You have posters here who want it both ways "isn't it terrible some are depressed by the actions of the authorities", same posters would slam the authorities for major outbreaks in nursing homes.

    There is no other option currently. Our oldest are highly vulnerable, they have to be protected.


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