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Veg plans for 2021

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  • This was my fourth sowing. Loads of peas and beans failed too, but I either succeeded with some or bought in replacements. The year was just too cold for too long.




  • Bought myself a heat mat this year......worked a treat.




  • tromtipp wrote: »
    This was my fourth sowing. Loads of peas and beans failed too, but I either succeeded with some or bought in replacements. The year was just too cold for too long.

    I started all my peas and beans in trays in the house and greenhouse and planted out when bigger.
    It seems to have worked well




  • tromtipp wrote: »
    near Nenagh, that's a kind thought.

    PM sent.....




  • Thank you - noted and replied to. My seedling will take weeks to get to the size of your plants, so I'd be most grateful.

    I'll sort out some kind of indoor germination for next year - the management end of vegetable gardening was always my mother's job, and I'm having to learn stuff now that she's gone.


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  • Zero experience with growing veg but sowed the following a couple of days again indoors, planning to transplant them outdoors.

    Radish
    Carrots
    Red cabbage
    Kohl Rabi
    Cauliflower
    Turnip
    Cabbage
    Broccoli
    Calabrese
    Beetroot
    Runner beans, moonlight

    From what I've read, I should really only have sowed the carrots, radish and beetroot directly outdoors.
    I've also started a few months too late but not too bothered about that as I want to kick things off and see what happens.

    Need to build a raised bed next week.




  • Pulled my first turnips this evening for tomorrow dinner.
    Garlic is up a little early but I needed the bed.




  • I had my first new potatoes for dinner last night. They were not quite at the 90-day point, but I wanted to see how this particular crop sown from saved seed in far-from-ideal conditions was doing. Not too bad - half a kilo from one sad little plant. Signs of drought-stress on the tubers, which would be consistent with them having been essentially surface-sown and not earthed up very much - at attempt to give them as much warmth as possible while it was still quite cold and wet.

    Moneymaker tomatoes are now flourishing. From the first lot of laterals that I pulled off for propogation, there are only three that have taken, but I left a few conveniently outward-facing laterals at the time, and have increased the number of trained vines now from seven to twelve (with another twenty laterals pulled off for propogation.

    With the way the weather's been so far this year, I'm going to ignore many of the traditional "seasonal guidelines" and sow some crops at very much the "wrong" time just to see what happens. That does depend on getting my beds back into proper working order though - proving very difficult at the moment with wave after wave after wave of thunderstorm sweeping past.




  • Plucked a few early (non-fertile) round courgettes from the plants that survived the slug assaults. Pulled a few garlic that were clearly ready, gave one as a gift to an older friend we visited yesterday who was very happy, having used up her garlic supply from last year. This will be a good year in the yard for garlic at least, though there've been some snails on the leaves they don't damage the plants.

    Perennial artichokes are out and at least 1 one looks to be edible soon. Great plants, keep coming back year after year and spreading on their own. Barely need weeding, don't seem to mind the wind off the ocean.

    Had a few raspberries from plants we planted last year, too, a bit ahead of schedule. Some of the leaves are kind of curled and unhappy, removed those.

    Planted some 'ragged jack' kale to replace the kales lost to the slugs. I've been trapping slugs like crazy and, well, hopefully these kale go in large enough to set roots and get going.




  • Igotadose wrote: »
    I've been trapping slugs like crazy ...

    I've outsourced my slug-control to someone who's happy to do it for free! :D

    Clidier-Frogs-NToads-04.jpg


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  • I've outsourced my slug-control to someone who's happy to do it for free! :D

    That fella be as big as a tree stump if he lived in my yard!

    Interesting you point this out - at least 2 of the best gardener's around have 'natural' ponds, that is, they built them but just let whatever colonize so no goldfish or whatever.... And both have frogs in their ponds.

    Has the slug population dropped since you built your pond? I believe that I have a spot I could stick something small-ish and let the frogs have at it. I think your pond is fairly new, so maybe you have some observations pre- and post-pond on the frog's impact. Frogs are great to have no matter what. We've got the occasional visiting hedgehog that might do in the slugs, and I've expermented with netting out the dead slugs from my slug 'swimming pools' and leaving their putrescing corpses on a concrete block for the birds to eat, which they do, but that's about it.




  • Igotadose wrote: »
    Has the slug population dropped since you built your pond? ... I think your pond is fairly new, so maybe you have some observations pre- and post-pond on the frog's impact.

    Difficult to say, as the whole garden is still very much a building site. In fact, the pond itself is still under construction - that fellow is soaking in a test trench that'll eventually be enlarged to become a yard overlooking the (future) pond. The storms of the last month have kept it wet enough for some of the locals to go for a swim:

    Clidier-Frogs-NToads-07.jpg

    If there's a definite benefit, it's been to increase the range of species: that's the first time I've seen a natterjack toad on my own land - it's always been common toads up to now; and although I didn't see any frogs at all here (in 16 years) until last summer - even before I started to think of creating a wetland area - this one is a different species too. The population of green lizards has most certainly increased significantly as well.

    Are they coming here because they know there's a great supply of organic slugs available, thanks to my no-kill gardening practices, or because the neighbouring farmer has switched his fields from pasture into Roundup-ed monocultured cropland. Dunno, but I'm not complaining ... except for the fact that I waste an awful lot of time sitting still, watching (and talking to) them!




  • Igotadose wrote: »
    Plucked a few early (non-fertile) round courgettes from the plants that survived the slug assaults. Pulled a few garlic that were clearly ready, gave one as a gift to an older friend we visited yesterday who was very happy, having used up her garlic supply from last year. This will be a good year in the yard for garlic at least, though there've been some snails on the leaves they don't damage the plants.

    Perennial artichokes are out and at least 1 one looks to be edible soon. Great plants, keep coming back year after year and spreading on their own. Barely need weeding, don't seem to mind the wind off the ocean.

    Had a few raspberries from plants we planted last year, too, a bit ahead of schedule. Some of the leaves are kind of curled and unhappy, removed those.

    Planted some 'ragged jack' kale to replace the kales lost to the slugs. I've been trapping slugs like crazy and, well, hopefully these kale go in large enough to set roots and get going.
    What does a ripe artichoke look like.

    Have some but no ideas how to even eat them




  • What does a ripe artichoke look like.

    Have some but no ideas how to even eat them

    It's stopped getting bigger and it's leaves are starting to open; if about 1/2 the leaves are bent back, it's ready.

    In this image, I'd say the 3 biggest artichokes are harvestable, with the one with the dark leaves behind the small one in front is very very harvestable and should be eaten soon.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a7/Ripe_artichoke_flowers.jpg


    Here's how we prepare and eat them. In Corca Dhuibhne, the earwigs love living in them, so we completely submerge the artichoke in water in a sealed container or whatever keeps the artichoke submerged. Let it sit for about 15 minutes.

    The earwigs will float off, you pour out the water, replace with fresh and repeat the process. Usually takes about three or four repetitions to get them all.

    Then, rinse the artichoke very well. Put it in a pot on the hob that has about 3cm of water in it. Boil it on a low boil until the leaves are tender and easily pull away. Probably 45 minutes to an hour.

    To serve, we serve it with melted garlic butter. Peel the leaves and eat the insides of the leaves, just scrape them off with your teeth, like you'd eat the cheese off a cracker. When all the mature leaves are done and you get to the thistly-looking heart, scrape off the 'furry' top and enjoy the heart with the butter. Great treat food.

    Artichokes should do well in Kerry climate, they don't mind it damp or foggy. I have seen them growing wild (perhaps feral is a better word, abandoned house), and cultivated in gardens and they taste fine.




  • Igotadose wrote: »
    It's stopped getting bigger and it's leaves are starting to open; if about 1/2 .

    Thanks for the detailed response. Mine are at about the same stage.
    I planted. Jerusalem artichokes and there was a globe in the bag. I'm really thinking of letting it flower this year. Though I might take a couple now I know what to do with them :)




  • Difficult to say, as the whole garden is still very much a building site. In fact, the pond itself is still under construction - that fellow is soaking in a test trench that'll eventually be enlarged to become a yard overlooking the (future) pond. The storms of the last month have kept it wet enough for some of the locals to go for a swim:

    Clidier-Frogs-NToads-07.jpg

    If there's a definite benefit, it's been to increase the range of species: that's the first time I've seen a natterjack toad on my own land - it's always been common toads up to now; and although I didn't see any frogs at all here (in 16 years) until last summer - even before I started to think of creating a wetland area - this one is a different species too. The population of green lizards has most certainly increased significantly as well.

    Are they coming here because they know there's a great supply of organic slugs available, thanks to my no-kill gardening practices, or because the neighbouring farmer has switched his fields from pasture into Roundup-ed monocultured cropland. Dunno, but I'm not complaining ... except for the fact that I waste an awful lot of time sitting still, watching (and talking to) them!

    It's when they answer you is when you should be worried:)




  • Thanks for the detailed response. Mine are at about the same stage.
    I planted. Jerusalem artichokes and there was a globe in the bag. I'm really thinking of letting it flower this year. Though I might take a couple now I know what to do with them :)

    Jerusalem artichoke's not an artichoke. Have never found a way to prepare them that I like and herself despises them. Globe artichokes ftw.




  • Jerusalem artichoke soup is delicious, but not for nothing do they get called fartychokes. I believe it's the inulin - it's supposed to be very good for the gut.




  • Had hoped to have (real) artichokes underway this year, but they were amongst the many seeds that didn't germinate. :(

    I have some Jerusalem artichokes growing in a pot, a souvenir of a trip to Picardy last winter, where they were served for dinner by a friend. Haven't yet decided where to put them for the long-term.

    In the meantime, I'm trying to catch up with what should have already been done. Sowed lettuce, cabbage, coriander, basil, beetroot, carrot, sweetcorn and green/yellow beans today, and transplanted the few surviving gherkins and pumpkins into their summer location.

    Also taking advantage of the persistently damp weather (meaning the soil is uncharacteristically easy to work for this time of year) to transplant some of the carrots sown earlier. Will see how this first batch hold up over the next week, then thin & transplant the rest if they're happy.




  • I usually roast the Jerusalem artichokes along with oca and mashua for Sunday dinner.


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  • Anyone know where I might get Stupice tomato seeds in Ireland?

    If I buy them online, the price of postage exceeds the price of the seeds. Thanks




  • Well it's official. I've a 1000 sq meter veg garden and it's full.

    Ate our own spuds, spinach and chard today.
    Spuds were from last years planting.

    Another few weeks I think for my earlies though I planted them paddy's day.

    Brassicas is cooming on.

    Had to resow carrots and parsnips yesterday for the 3rd time in the hope they will germinate




  • First time poster on here. Great to read about all the GIY efforts. I've got a very small allotment.

    Currently picking peas, sugar snaps and some broccoli. Also gobbling up a few punnets of strawberries.

    I have a question about leaf curling on tomatoes.

    I have about 5 different varieties of tomato in this year and one variety has significant leaf curl. I have 3 plants outside and 3 inside the greenhouse and they all are affected equally.

    I've been watering consistently every 2 days but there seems to be little change. Any thoughts?




  • quazzy wrote: »
    First time poster on here. Great to read about all the GIY efforts. I've got a very small allotment.

    Currently picking peas, sugar snaps and some broccoli. Also gobbling up a few punnets of strawberries.

    I have a question about leaf curling on tomatoes.

    I have about 5 different varieties of tomato in this year and one variety has significant leaf curl. I have 3 plants outside and 3 inside the greenhouse and they all are affected equally.

    I've been watering consistently every 2 days but there seems to be little change. Any thoughts?


    Any black edge to leaf curl?CAN be due to over fertilising.




  • 2011abc wrote: »
    Any black edge to leaf curl?CAN be due to over fertilising.

    Don't think so. Will check it though, thanks for reply.




  • Well, after an actual hot week (first time in 6 years I wore a pair of shorts for 4 days in a row), the veg has kind of perked up. Brassicas and beetroot which were doing fine prior enjoyed it. Warmer loving vegetables like squash improved a little, but far behind where they were a year ago this time.

    Watered everything nearly every day, now that the rain's back its good to not have that chore.

    Finished the softneck garlic harvest, I clearly planted too many, have enough buds for planting out next year and for consumption well into next year. Really like the 'Provence" purple variety I got from Fruithill farm, its by far the biggest and tastiest of the various garlics I put out last fall.


    Spent a fair bit of time hacking back the brambles, willowherb, thistles and nettles in the side yard for another patch for herself to put in more fruit bushes. There are so many pests in that part of the yard, slugs, earwigs, woodlice and so many weeds that only really tough things like fruit bushes and garlic do well there, everything else is a struggle to keep it from being eaten or outcompeted. It's the least windy and sunniest part of the yard which is a big shame, without the challenges it'd make about 1/3 acre of prime garden space.

    An attempt to grow carrots in large flowerpots did very well. No root fly problems, the only mistake I made was not to thin more aggressively so we got a fair number of small carrots but a decent amount of large ones, too. Onions planted similarly did well. Definitely planning on expanding the flowerpot garden next year. I once grew spuds this way, and they did o.k. too.





  • Bumper year on spuds this year.

    Dug up 90kg of earlies from 16kg of seed potatoes.

    Thats more than we got for the whole of last year.

    Still have lates to dig.

    Garlic didn't do so well and red onions bolted.

    Over wintered onions did well.

    Have lots of kale and froze other brassica.

    Beans doing well and still have to harvest them.





  • Fruit bushes poor this year....maybe birds got to them first.

    Lots of peas....picking and freezing last of them.

    Broad Beans only so so.

    Runner beans looking good.

    Outdoor sown tomatoes doing well....just need to turn red. Saved seeds from shop bought plum variety doing best of all.

    Turnips good....Suedes poor.

    French Beans good.

    Dozens of Sun Flowers about to display in the next week or so.





  • Big onions

    Garlic is small

    Kale is great - some holes from the slugs but no caterpillars yet

    Loads of courgettes - going to pickle some for the winter

    Redcurrants were great

    Spuds are good - no blight yet

    Pumpkins are doing great outside (i think that hot weather did them good)

    Beetroot is ok

    I unfortunatly didn’t plant any leeks or parsnips. So i’ll miss them over the winter.



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  • I need to purchase about 50 long Bamboo sticks, about 6 feet in length. I know that these can be bought in Woodie's and Garden Centres. Just wondering if anyone has found a source that has them at a good price. I am based in Dublin South. Thanks



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