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Woman and girl found alive after 15 hours in sea off coast

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  • Registered Users Posts: 13,275 ✭✭✭✭fits


    Wombatman wrote: »
    A model of Galway Bay already exists. It performs very well is search and rescue situations, which unfortunately usually involves recovering the bodies of suicide victims.

    https://www.bodc.ac.uk/resources/inventories/edmed/report/6519/

    Was it in use yesterday?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,337 ✭✭✭Wombatman


    Ellen's father Johnny Glynn is a legend of Galway soccer. He captained Galway United to an FAI Cup win where he scored the winning goal against Shamrock Rovers in the 1991.

    He is head of Football Development at Galway United and goes out of his way to help young kids get the most out of the game all over Galway. Overjoyed for him and his family.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,337 ✭✭✭Wombatman


    fits wrote: »
    Was it in use yesterday?
    The Marine Institute ocean sciences staff are working on tide and current modelling to assist the search crews.

    https://www.breakingnews.ie/ireland/two-women-found-alive-after-major-air-and-sea-search-in-galway-1013931.html


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,519 ✭✭✭GalwayGrrrrrl


    Still smiling at the news that the girls were found. I was interested to see that they usually paddle board at Silver strand beach but went to Furbo beach as the road to silver strand is closed (due to overcrowding). The girls were unfamiliar with Furbo beach. This, along with the sudden wind speed change, was a possible factor in the incident. Thank goodness they were found, very brave young ladies and huge thanks to all the search teams.


  • Registered Users Posts: 21,520 ✭✭✭✭Tell me how


    check_six wrote: »
    Great effort from all involved in the rescue search. Amazing clarity of thought from the two ladies too. They knew that they couldn't make land at the Cliffs of Moher, and when they felt that their efforts to make it to Inisheer were starting to fade they anchored themselves to the lobster pot marker. Panic could easily push someone into making a bad decision in far less dangerous circumstances.

    And apparently they took turns sleeping which was incredible given that A, they were able to consider it in their situation and B that they did so in a sensible manner with one always being awake to keep an eye out.

    Both the 2 girls and the 2 guys on the boat should be involved in educational videos/lessons on water safety, staying calm in a crisis and search and rescue.

    Really positive story all round in the middle of 2020.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 160 ✭✭TwoWheeledTim


    fits wrote: »
    Was it in use yesterday?

    "The Marine Institute ocean sciences staff are working on tide and current modelling to assist the search crews."

    Works well for predicting the outflow from Mutton Island before it leaves the bay or for a body in the water.

    But I don't think they're ready yet for an inflatable paddle board sitting on the surface - they were pushed mostly by the NE wind.

    It was interesting to see thay the Olivers' boat was also quite lightweight with a good area for catching the wind... they'd be familiar with drifting off position from the wind when pulling up pots.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,842 ✭✭✭Rob A. Bank


    Still smiling at the news that the girls were found. I was interested to see that they usually paddle board at Silver strand beach but went to Furbo beach as the road to silver strand is closed (due to overcrowding). The girls were unfamiliar with Furbo beach. This, along with the sudden wind speed change, was a possible factor in the incident. Thank goodness they were found, very brave young ladies and huge thanks to all the search teams.

    Having had a bit of experience sailing... the offshore wind can really catch the unwary out. It seems calm where you are sheltered by the land and the water near the shore may be as flat as a millpond, but the farther out you go the worse the conditions get.

    You also cannot judge the wave height because you are looking at the waves from 'behind' and also the wind can be squally as it blows from the land over the water. When paddling with the wind at their backs, the relative wind probably seemed quite benign. But when they turned around to face the strong squally northerly wind, it had pushed these girls beyond the point of no return to land.

    Fair dues to the Olivers and the young ladies for not panicking in a very stressful situation.

    This bit of great news is good for the soul.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,918 ✭✭✭beardybrewer


    Rob you might know as some pointed out they were possibly inexperienced and at least unfamiliar with Furbo. Where would one inform themselves on what beaches are safe for that type of activity or surfing?

    In fairness to them when I think of Furbo I think of it being in the bay, sheltered, and shallow enough to be kid friendly. Obviously once you go beyond the sand bank and get out there it can change quick.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,842 ✭✭✭Rob A. Bank


    Rob you might know as some pointed out they were possibly inexperienced and at least unfamiliar with Furbo. Where would one inform themselves on what beaches are safe for that type of activity or surfing?

    In fairness to them when I think of Furbo I think of it being in the bay, sheltered, and shallow enough to be kid friendly. Obviously once you go beyond the sand bank and get out there it can change quick.

    Agreed... Furbo is a safe sheltered beach for swimming ... It is also wise to paddle along the shore rather than going straight out, in an area that is unfamiliar to you


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,275 ✭✭✭✭fits


    Rob you might know as some pointed out they were possibly inexperienced and at least unfamiliar with Furbo. k.

    Their ability to keep cool heads points to some experience imo. I’m not sure they are getting enough credit for it. It’s an amazing survival story.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 15,849 ✭✭✭✭Discodog


    A friend of mine headed out in a rib & would of found them. He ended up at the spot where they were found. He plotted a course based on the conditions & can't understand why more resources weren't in that area.

    Anyone going to sea can carry an epirb. They cost from €250 & when activated they send an emergency distress signal that the lifeboats & helicopter can zoom into. A harbour master told me that, if you triggered an epirb in Galway Bay, you would likely be rescued withing 30 mins.

    https://www.gaelforcemarine.co.uk/en/ie/Ocean-Signal-rescueME-PLB1/m-5113.aspx?PartnerID=616&utm_source=google&utm_medium=shopping&utm_campaign=Ireland&gclid=Cj0KCQjw7Nj5BRCZARIsABwxDKJ-Eh-gaOd9L7_vtpewlqXH1Xbr2-A3QzJYzAkmmtW9_ZMQP4kJrvUaAsTMEALw_wcB


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 160 ✭✭TwoWheeledTim


    Discodog wrote: »
    Anyone going to sea can carry an epirb. They cost from €250 & when activated they send an emergency distress signal that the lifeboats & helicopter can zoom into. UaAsTMEALw_wcB[/url]

    Yes, but you're doubling the cost of the Lidl paddle board...... a lot of casual or infrequent water users wouldn't make that investment.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,849 ✭✭✭✭Discodog


    Yes, but you're doubling the cost of the Lidl paddle board...... a lot of casual or infrequent water users wouldn't make that investment.

    Not enough professional users have them either.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,872 ✭✭✭✭whisky_galore


    Discodog wrote: »
    A friend of mine headed out in a rib & would of found them. He ended up at the spot where they were found. He plotted a course based on the conditions & can't understand why more resources weren't in that area.

    Anyone going to sea can carry an epirb. They cost from €250 & when activated they send an emergency distress signal that the lifeboats & helicopter can zoom into.

    When people are too stingy to pay, what, 40 for a decent lifejacket, they're hardly going to pay 250 for an epirb.
    I would agree though, if I was sea kayaking (on a proper sea kayak, not a Lidl inflatable toy I might add) I would invest in one.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,872 ✭✭✭✭whisky_galore


    hamburgham wrote: »
    And one of the mother's watching.

    Didn't keep a great watch, did she?


  • Registered Users Posts: 526 ✭✭✭downwesht


    Storm 10 wrote: »
    Were you out there, I said it already they could not use their heat seeking due to the torrential rain it does not work in rain, there was low cloud thunder and lightning they were flying in terrible conditions, Galway Bay is full of currents they have to start out from the point of departure then spread it out as they search, its easy put words together from a key board


    I worked on Galway Bay for many years.My point is that the Air Corps,Airsea Rescue and RNLI have conducted 100s if not thousands of exercises in Galway Bay over the years and should know the place like the back of their hands.These girls took turns at going to sleep......conditions certainly eased to allow same.....


  • Registered Users Posts: 81,223 ✭✭✭✭biko


    One person banned, his posts and quoting removed to keep thread on track


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,898 ✭✭✭Storm 10


    Discodog wrote: »
    A friend of mine headed out in a rib & would of found them. He ended up at the spot where they were found. He plotted a course based on the conditions & can't understand why more resources weren't in that area.

    Anyone going to sea can carry an epirb. They cost from €250 & when activated they send an emergency distress signal that the lifeboats & helicopter can zoom into. A harbour master told me that, if you triggered an epirb in Galway Bay, you would likely be rescued withing 30 mins.

    https://www.gaelforcemarine.co.uk/en/ie/Ocean-Signal-rescueME-PLB1/m-5113.aspx?PartnerID=616&utm_source=google&utm_medium=shopping&utm_campaign=Ireland&gclid=Cj0KCQjw7Nj5BRCZARIsABwxDKJ-Eh-gaOd9L7_vtpewlqXH1Xbr2-A3QzJYzAkmmtW9_ZMQP4kJrvUaAsTMEALw_wcB

    You don't need to have an epirb just a water proof hand held Marine radio stuffed in your jacket and just call the Coastguard on Channel 16 and they launch the Lifeboat ,If an epirb is activated in works the same way but with the radio you can talk to the Coastguard, you can pick up one for around 120 Euro .


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,849 ✭✭✭✭Discodog


    downwesht wrote: »
    I worked on Galway Bay for many years.My point is that the Air Corps,Airsea Rescue and RNLI have conducted 100s if not thousands of exercises in Galway Bay over the years and should know the place like the back of their hands.These girls took turns at going to sleep......conditions certainly eased to allow same.....

    Pure guesswork but I suspect that they thought they would either be washed up or would manage to get ashore further along the Coast. We have to accept that, after so long, one might be expecting a recovery rather than a rescue.

    It appears that, only a few locals, realised the way that the wind combined with the normal offshore wind would push them towards South Aran. The critical thing was to find them before they crossed into open Ocean.

    From what I was told the Olivers decided to get out to the gap as fast as possible & then double back to search. Meanwhile my friend went directly towards the area.

    Bare in mind that, after hours in the water, the difference between the water temperature & their body temperature wouldn't be a lot for the thermal camera to find.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,849 ✭✭✭✭Discodog


    Storm 10 wrote: »
    You don't need to have an epirb just a water proof hand held Marine radio stuffed in your jacket and just call the Coastguard on Channel 16 and they launch the Lifeboat ,If an epirb is activated in works the same way but with the radio you can talk to the Coastguard, you can pick up one for around 120 Euro .

    Yes but an epirb is foolproof & has the locator function. I was told that one reason they weren't widely used was a false rumour that you could be fined for a false activation.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 801 ✭✭✭FLOOPER


    It was fantastic that they were found in good health and spirits.

    They were very smart and calm in the situation no doubt and that's what ultimately led to a great conclusion.

    But they also had a lot going for them. They were on two floatables; they were wearing life jackets or close to; the sea was possibly the warmest it can be here; there were two of them for support and they were young; they were also found after about 5 hours of daylight search.

    I'm thrilled for the families involved and the gumption and resources the women executed but it's not a miracle. I was quite taken aback with one of the fathers saying he didn't expect them to be found. OK, I can understand you kind of expect the WCS but really.

    Anyway thank God they're safe and sound.

    And I really think that the young lad who rescued another boy was far more precarious and dangerous than this and worthy of more airtime.

    I'm just talking about a bit of perspective and totally understand why it would be a newspaper's wet dream. I'm not trying to spoil everyone's joy.

    Just my tuppence worth.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,849 ✭✭✭✭Discodog


    FLOOPER wrote: »
    It was fantastic that they were found in good health and spirits.

    They were very smart and calm in the situation no doubt and that's what ultimately led to a great conclusion.

    But they also had a lot going for them. They were on two floatables; they were wearing life jackets or close to; the sea was possibly the warmest it can be here; there were two of them for support and they were young; they were also found after about 5 hours of daylight search.

    I'm thrilled for the families involved and the gumption and resources the women executed but it's not a miracle. I was quite taken aback with one of the fathers saying he didn't expect them to be found. OK, I can understand you kind of expect the WCS but really.

    Anyway thank God they're safe and sound.

    And I really think that the young lad who rescued another boy was far more precarious and dangerous than this and worthy of more airtime.

    I'm just talking about a bit of perspective and totally understand why it would be a newspaper's wet dream. I'm not trying to spoil everyone's joy.

    Just my tuppence worth.

    Yes really. Very few incidents like this have a happy outcome. Most expected the worse.


  • Registered Users Posts: 801 ✭✭✭FLOOPER


    Discodog wrote: »
    Yes really. Very few incidents like this have a happy outcome. Most expected the worse.

    Again, I can understand to a point. But as I said they had a lot going for them and I'm sure there are very few cases where people who are marooned with a life vest perish. That's all I'm saying.

    The father maybe of a certain mindset but if it was me (and of course I'll never know and I certainly don't want to criticise as we would all act in a different way) I would expect myself to cling on to whatever positive thought and fact I could.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,898 ✭✭✭Storm 10


    downwesht wrote: »
    I worked on Galway Bay for many years.My point is that the Air Corps,Airsea Rescue and RNLI have conducted 100s if not thousands of exercises in Galway Bay over the years and should know the place like the back of their hands.These girls took turns at going to sleep......conditions certainly eased to allow same.....

    Air Corps have not been involved in search and rescue since the Coastguard took over , no two incidents will have the same outcome , tidal conditions wind, currents etc all change the scenario, only for the weather conditions on the night they would have been found earlier in fact a Helicopter was forced to depart the scene due to lightning strikes, this shows how brave the Lifeboat crews were who stayed out in those conditions all night.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,912 ✭✭✭✭Spanish Eyes


    No judgment here, but realistically how much did the SAR operation cost us for this.

    Just do what you want parallel to the shore now thanks.

    Very glad they were found alive.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,898 ✭✭✭Storm 10


    No judgment here, but realistically how much did the SAR operation cost us for this.

    Just do what you want parallel to the shore now thanks.

    Very glad they were found alive.

    Would you worry about the cost if it was you in difficulty, that's the thing about searches money does not matter just rescue the casualties


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,301 ✭✭✭gordongekko


    Jesus what's with all the begrudgingly. This was a fantastic result. From listening to the interviews the helicopter was very close to them but it's like finding a needle in a haystack. Thankfully the Oliver's found that needle but it was by luck more than anything else. The girls said they saw loads of boats but none saw them. The girls fought the tide. Tried to head for the shore and for the cliffs of mother and again for Aran. At all times they missed their target due to the current. Models and chance are just that and thankfully this was a miracle result.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,849 ✭✭✭✭Discodog


    FLOOPER wrote: »

    Again, I can understand to a point. But as I said they had a lot going for them and I'm sure there are very few cases where people who are marooned with a life vest perish. That's all I'm saying.

    The father maybe of a certain mindset but if it was me (and of course I'll never know and I certainly don't want to criticise as we would all act in a different way) I would expect myself to cling on to whatever positive thought and fact I could.

    It's the exposure that kills you even if you have a life vest. Most won't survive 15 hours in Irish conditions


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 160 ✭✭TwoWheeledTim


    Storm 10 wrote: »
    You don't need to have an epirb just a water proof hand held Marine radio stuffed in your jacket and just call the Coastguard on Channel 16 and they launch the Lifeboat ,If an epirb is activated in works the same way but with the radio you can talk to the Coastguard, you can pick up one for around 120 Euro .

    Or even a well charged mobile phone in a tethered waterproof case. There's good strong signal across the bay.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 160 ✭✭TwoWheeledTim


    I'm glad they're not being berated and the coverage has been very positive.

    But I wonder what the reaction would have been if it was 2 middle aged men, I'd say all the Karens would be out.


This discussion has been closed.
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