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Woman and girl found alive after 15 hours in sea off coast

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  • Registered Users Posts: 13,280 ✭✭✭✭fits


    Do the Coastguard not do that too? There must be computer models out there that would be quite accurate

    No model can replicate the intuition that comes from years of experience.


  • Registered Users Posts: 624 ✭✭✭Meeoow


    It must have been really scary out there in the pitch dark. Delighted for them. I wonder will this be on 'saving lives at sea'. Probably not, as the fishermen wouldn't have had cameras. It would have been a great episode.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,166 ✭✭✭Still waters


    Jimbob1977 wrote: »
    Fisherman is a vocation, rather than any old job!!

    Great understanding of the elements and nature.

    Totally agree with you, the dedication to do what they do i could never understand, i see a couple of local lads i know that head out in all conditions and can't get my head around why they do it, great people to do that sort of work and good luck to the 2 lads that found the girls, i hope they get some acknowledgment in some way from the city or council


  • Registered Users Posts: 705 ✭✭✭Cushtie


    This is a great result. Can only imagine the fear those two girls felt and the sheer relief when the fishermen showed up.

    Fair play that man, all his years on the sea. His experience and gut instinct really paid off.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,172 ✭✭✭cannotlogin


    What bloody heros those two men are! Emotional watching the news now. Those girls are so lucky.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,329 ✭✭✭owlbethere


    Just catching up with the news at 9. Patrick Oliver, the fisherman, doesn't look a day over 40. He's looking very well. How is he a father of such a big and young family. An absolute hero and a genius, himself and his son.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,268 ✭✭✭twowheelsonly


    I hope TG4 are thinking the same.
    Wonder what distance did they cover in 15 hours.
    That lobster pot is 2 miles south of Inis Oirr
    IT have a rough map of it
    https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/young-women-found-clinging-to-lobster-pot-after-spending-night-missing-in-galway-bay-1.4329346


    The video on that page is surely a different rescue despite the caption saying that it's this one ??
    Great work from all concerned in any case and great presence of mind from the girls to moor onto the lobster line.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,301 ✭✭✭gordongekko


    owlbethere wrote: »
    Just catching up with the news at 9. Patrick Oliver, the fisherman, doesn't look a day over 40. He's looking very well. How is he a father of such a big and young family. An absolute hero and a genius, himself and his son.

    hes 38


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 12,641 Mod ✭✭✭✭riffmongous


    fits wrote: »
    No model can replicate the intuition that comes from years of experience.

    I would respectfully disagree, a model can be trained to do anything intuition can, in fact intuition is just your brains version of simulation.. anyway this isn't the thread for it


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,388 ✭✭✭inisboffin


    Were the lads searching all day in that area for the women? I thought they were found around lunchtime?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,941 ✭✭✭6541


    Such a great result, it actually brought a tear to a hard, cynical eye. Fair play to everyone involved.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,280 ✭✭✭✭fits


    I would respectfully disagree, a model can be trained to do anything intuition can, in fact intuition is just your brains version of simulation.. anyway this isn't the thread for it

    No they can’t. Models always are a simplification Of real conditions.
    Models are useful In many instances alright. It depends on situation. However in this one experience and intuition won out.


  • Registered Users Posts: 116 ✭✭Solli


    No wetsuits! Plus the rain hammered down so hard that night, thunder and lightning too. They’re all heroic


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,174 ✭✭✭✭NIMAN


    Great to see a happy ending to the story.
    So many don't end this way.

    Fair play to the 2 fishermen. Deserve all the praise they are getting.


  • Posts: 3,656 ✭✭✭ [Deleted User]


    bodyguard1 wrote: »
    Absolutely delighted for the two women and their families and of course huge respect for all those involved in the rescue especially the Oliver father and son who pinpointed the area they would have drifted to given the weather conditions and wind speeds and brought them back safely which definitely deserves special recognition from the City Council and the National Water Safety Awards however I feel sorry for the 16 year old who jumped into the Boyne River to rescue two 11 year old boys who got into difficulty yesterday evening and was overshadowed by today's events. He is also deserving of recognition and a National Water Safety Bravery Award, it just highlights the dangers associated within our rivers and sea's around the country but thankfully both incidents had a happy ending for those involved.

    Very well said , that young lad on the Boyne rescue was absolutely amazing ! Such bravery, he didn’t think twice about rescuing 2 other boys, the Boyne is treacherous especially in lower water with reeds and other plants and debris which can trap. A lovely young lad and he was so humble in his interview. His parents must be so proud!

    Delighted the young girls got rescued, how close they were to tragedy. Just shows how important local knowledge and years of experience is, beating the rescue helicopters with all their technology. God was looking down on all yesterday.


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,174 ✭✭✭✭NIMAN


    To be fair God didn't save those in the water, but thats an argument for a different day.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 14,311 ✭✭✭✭weldoninhio


    fits wrote: »

    That fisherman deserves some sort of civic award from the country. To be able to think and chart exactly where he thought they be, he literally saved their lives.


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,174 ✭✭✭✭NIMAN


    It must have been tough for those girls to hear the rescue helicopter in the vicinity and not have it see them.
    I'm sure those were worrying times for them.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 14,311 ✭✭✭✭weldoninhio


    I would respectfully disagree, a model can be trained to do anything intuition can, in fact intuition is just your brains version of simulation.. anyway this isn't the thread for it

    There’s always one.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,454 ✭✭✭Field east


    I would respectfully disagree, a model can be trained to do anything intuition can, in fact intuition is just your brains version of simulation.. anyway this isn't the thread for it

    Well ONLY if the modeling ‘industry’ has ‘caught up’ with all the intuition out there


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  • Registered Users Posts: 28,944 ✭✭✭✭Wanderer78


    NIMAN wrote:
    To be fair God didn't save those in the water, but thats an argument for a different day.


    They could have, who knows, I was amazed but glad they were found


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,454 ✭✭✭Field east


    bodyguard1 wrote: »
    Absolutely delighted for the two women and their families and of course huge respect for all those involved in the rescue especially the Oliver father and son who pinpointed the area they would have drifted to given the weather conditions and wind speeds and brought them back safely which definitely deserves special recognition from the City Council and the National Water Safety Awards however I feel sorry for the 16 year old who jumped into the Boyne River to rescue two 11 year old boys who got into difficulty yesterday evening and was overshadowed by today's events. He is also deserving of recognition and a National Water Safety Bravery Award, it just highlights the dangers associated within our rivers and sea's around the country but thankfully both incidents had a happy ending for those involved.

    What a happy outcome for all in both situations.
    People do what they are capable of doing quiet often - sometimes putting their lives at a real risk. How to thank/reward them. Hard to know how to do it. Apart from some kind of an event to publicly acknowledge the action we can be kind and respectful to them going forward. BUT we should also be kind and respectful to all others who do what they are capable of doing and especially in trying/ dangerous circumstances , working very long hours,eg miners, bin collection men, anyone working underground ,farmers , doctors, nurses, fishermen, teachers, etc, etc, etc, etc.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,245 ✭✭✭check_six


    The father of one of the ladies said that the rescue helicopter was very close to them on its search pattern last night. He said his daughter claimed they were only 50 metres from the helicopter at one point. It just goes to show just how difficult it is to spot people in the sea even when you have the advantage of infrared cameras, and navigation equipment that allows really precise search patterns.
    Great effort from all involved in the rescue search. Amazing clarity of thought from the two ladies too. They knew that they couldn't make land at the Cliffs of Moher, and when they felt that their efforts to make it to Inisheer were starting to fade they anchored themselves to the lobster pot marker. Panic could easily push someone into making a bad decision in far less dangerous circumstances.


  • Registered Users Posts: 28,944 ✭✭✭✭Wanderer78


    check_six wrote:
    The father of one of the ladies said that the rescue helicopter was very close to them on its search pattern last night. He said his daughter claimed they were only 50 metres from the helicopter at one point. It just goes to show just how difficult it is to spot people in the sea even when you have the advantage of infrared cameras, and navigation equipment that allows really precise search patterns. Great effort from all involved in the rescue search. Amazing clarity of thought from the two ladies too. They knew that they couldn't make land at the Cliffs of Moher, and when they felt that their efforts to make it to Inisheer were starting to fade they anchored themselves to the lobster pot marker. Panic could easily push someone into making a bad decision in far less dangerous circumstances.


    I could see myself making bad decisions under such circumstances, it's amazing they're alive


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,465 ✭✭✭✭kippy


    Great outcome.
    They kept level heads when things went against them. Great work by all involved in the search too.
    The sea is dangerous and it's important to be well aware of the risks and to keep a level head, like these girls did, when things unexpectedly go against you.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,902 ✭✭✭Storm 10


    I know a guy in the Coastguard Helicopters, he said they cant use the heat seeking system when there is rain as nothing will show up, also very difficult to spot targets in the water in foggy and poor visibility from the air which they had yesterday, during the first night of searching the cloud was down on the deck with heavy rain and flashes of lightning which shows just what the Lifeboat and Coastguard crews had to deal with while they searched, they are very brave people. I would not be very happy searching in an open Lifeboat like the one in Galway with lightning hitting the water around me it takes some courage even when they go out in stormy conditions, we are very lucky to have people who when they get the call are prepared to put their lives on the line for others. I sincerely hope this incident will lead to an increase in donations to the RNLI.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,329 ✭✭✭owlbethere


    hes 38

    This is very awkward now for me. When I read in the news or here yesterday, a fisherman and his son, I presumed it would be an older man for some reason. A man in his 50s or 60s for some reason. So when I saw the news last night of Patrick Oliver, the fisherman, I was taken aback by how young and great he looked.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,329 ✭✭✭owlbethere


    Storm 10 wrote: »
    I know a guy in the Coastguard Helicopters, he said they cant use the heat seeking system when there is rain as nothing will show up, also very difficult to spot targets in the water in foggy and poor visibility from the air which they had yesterday, during the first night of searching the cloud was down on the deck with heavy rain and flashes of lightning which shows just what the Lifeboat and Coastguard crews had to deal with while they searched, they are very brave people. I would not be very happy searching in an open Lifeboat like the one in Galway with lightning hitting the water around me it takes some courage even when they go out in stormy conditions, we are very lucky to have people who when they get the call are prepared to put their lives on the line for others. I sincerely hope this incident will lead to an increase in donations to the RNLI.

    It was dry on land where I'm from in Connemara. That was at midnight the night before last, so Wednesday night. It was dry at 1am in the morning too. I don't know if it was raining out at sea though.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,329 ✭✭✭owlbethere


    kippy wrote: »
    Great outcome.
    They kept level heads when things went against them. Great work by all involved in the search too.
    The sea is dangerous and it's important to be well aware of the risks and to keep a level head, like these girls did, when things unexpectedly go against you.

    They are fantastic ladies how they know what to do. I was told that they tied their boards together when they were drifting out, so that they wouldn't drifted apart.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,281 ✭✭✭CrankyHaus


    I would respectfully disagree, a model can be trained to do anything intuition can, in fact intuition is just your brains version of simulation.. anyway this isn't the thread for it


    A model is only as good as the information that goes into it.
    I'm not sure if there are computerised current and tidal models of Irish coastal waters as detailed and nuanced as the knowledge of a fisherman with decades of experience of his waters, who in turn would base his knowledge on that of older fishermen. No doubt eventually there may be, but who knows when?


This discussion has been closed.
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