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American married to Irish Citizen want to have baby in Ireland

  • 03-08-2020 1:28pm
    #1
    Users Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 1 maymayyy


    Hi there,
    I am an Irish citizen and my wife is an American. We are currently living in US (I have a green card) and just found out my wife is pregnant. I am asking for some advice if we are allowed to come back to Ireland a few months before she is due, so that the baby is born in Ireland. Is that legal? Will they try to say something to her at the airport when she is entering?
    Any experience with this would be very helpful!

    Thanks so much.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 36,085 ✭✭✭✭ ohnonotgmail


    airlines wont let her travel if she is too far gone. we dont have the NHS here. I'm not sure why you would think that if you are an irish citizen.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,291 ✭✭✭✭ banie01


    NHS? In Ireland? That's news to me.

    Maternity care is free to Residents of Ireland regardless of citizenship.
    It is the residency that matters.

    The child of an Irish Citizen is an Irish Citizen by birth too.
    If you are seeking to avoid US healthcare/maternity costs, surely there's an easier way?


  • Registered Users Posts: 36,085 ✭✭✭✭ ohnonotgmail


    banie01 wrote: »
    NHS? In Ireland? That's news to me.

    Maternity care is free to Residents of Ireland regardless of citizenship.
    It is the residency that matters.

    The child of an Irish Citizen is an Irish Citizen by birth too.
    If you are seeking to avoid US healthcare/maternity costs, surely there's an easier way?

    you have to be ordinarily resident to qualify. so you have either lived here for 12 months or plan to.


  • Registered Users Posts: 219 ✭✭ Queasy Tadpole


    Are you sure you're Irish asking about the NHS?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,680 ✭✭✭ strandroad


    Has she ever lived in Ireland?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 15,409 ✭✭✭✭ iamwhoiam


    https://www.hse.ie/eng/services/find-a-service/eligibility.html


    A person living in Ireland for at least one year is considered by the HSE to be 'ordinarily resident' and is entitled to either full eligibility (Category 1) or limited eligibility (Category 2) for health services.

    People who have not been resident in Ireland for at least one year must satisfy the HSE that it is their intention to remain for a minimum of one year in order to be eligible for health services. Dependants of such individuals must also contact the HSE to confirm their eligibility.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,291 ✭✭✭✭ banie01


    you have to be ordinarily resident to qualify. so you have either lived here for 12 months or plan to.

    Thanks for the clarification.
    I did mention residency twice in my own post, let's at least give the OP the credit of assuming that whilst he was googling the Irish NHS...

    That they also checked the residency requirements ;)


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