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Parents with underlying conditions and schools

  • 25-07-2020 5:34pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 649 ✭✭✭ isup


    As a parent with an underlying condition I would be worried about my kids going back to school. Does anyone else have worries for themselves or grandparents? I'm immunocompromised and have been caucious so far. I know the kids need school so will probably be sending them when the schools open. But I see the majority of people out and about acting like this has gone away and just doing what they want.
    It doesn't seem to be spoken about.


«1

Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,751 ✭✭✭ mirrorwall14


    I’m hugely concerned. The schools are overcrowded. If they open at full capacity it makes a total mockery of social distancing. Take a look. These are just some schools on Facebook. Just look at those desks. How do you do this with social distancing? Masks won’t matter much when the students can barely fit in a room on a normal day....


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,751 ✭✭✭ mirrorwall14


    And for ****s and giggles, our government are paying 25-50k a day to protect themselves....

    (If anyone can tell me how to embed a pic from a mobile I’ll happily do it)


  • Registered Users Posts: 649 ✭✭✭ isup


    It does make me think that when they go back it makes any all the standard precautions pointless. If they did it right at least there's be a chance . That along with the other parents and family's being responsible.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,751 ✭✭✭ mirrorwall14


    isup wrote: »
    It does make me think that when they go back it makes any all the standard precautions pointless. If they did it right at least there's be a chance . That along with the other parents and family's being responsible.

    It makes a complete mockery of all the hard work everyone has done. What’s the difference between 30 18 year olds in Sixth year and 30 18 year olds in college? Apparently one needs social distancing and the other doesn’t


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,792 Postgrad10


    I hope there are provisions for immuno compromised children to receive home tuition.

    Then again will there be provision for immune comprised teachers ?

    What about the teachers coming in to homes to teach and spreading to parents /grandparents / children etc?

    I’m scared for everyone.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 287 ✭✭ DSN


    It makes a complete mockery of all the hard work everyone has done. What’s the difference between 30 18 year olds in Sixth year and 30 18 year olds in college? Apparently one needs social distancing and the other doesn’t

    I think it's more that remote learning doesn't work for primary or secondary school kids where as they think remote 3rd level lends itself better to a mix of online & face to face. And they not suddenly gonna build twice as many classrooms n & teachers to accommodate SD in schools.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,334 ✭✭✭ Charles Babbage


    It makes a complete mockery of all the hard work everyone has done. What’s the difference between 30 18 year olds in Sixth year and 30 18 year olds in college? Apparently one needs social distancing and the other doesn’t

    There is a some difference, in that the large numbers of students in college from all over the country and internationally is even more dangerous and than the same set of leaving certs from the same district sitting together each day in a school.

    However, there is a strong case that procedures should not be the same for national schools and leaving cert classes, even Sweden closed its schools for over 16s.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,645 ✭✭✭ SCOOP 64


    My sons school has 700 pupils and wouldn't be one of the largest how would it be possible to social distance, reach the stage now were economy comes first health second ,the pubs will reopen the 10th August regardless of numbers.


  • Registered Users Posts: 649 ✭✭✭ isup


    Postgrad10 wrote: »
    I hope there are provisions for immuno compromised children to receive home tuition.

    Then again will there be provision for immune comprised teachers ?

    What about the teachers coming in to homes to teach and spreading to parents /grandparents / children etc?

    I’m scared for everyone.

    And the teachers partners / parents . They have lives outside of work.


  • Registered Users Posts: 649 ✭✭✭ isup


    SCOOP 64 wrote: »
    My sons school has 700 pupils and wouldn't be one of the largest how would it be possible to social distance, reach the stage now were economy comes first health second ,the pubs will reopen the 10th August regardless of numbers.

    It seems like everyone has to fend for themselves now. And alot but not all of the people who aren't high risk arnt taking it seriously. Which really makes you feel alienated.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,751 ✭✭✭ mirrorwall14


    There is a some difference, in that the large numbers of students in college from all over the country and internationally is even more dangerous and than the same set of leaving certs from the same district sitting together each day in a school.

    However, there is a strong case that procedures should not be the same for national schools and leaving cert classes, even Sweden closed its schools for over 16s.

    Your second paragraph is more what I mean to be fair. 30 students plus teacher plus or minus an SNA in a room you couldn’t swing a cat in is a ludicrous proposal right now imo. But I totally see your point on the students from all over the country.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,831 ✭✭✭ heldel00


    ISUP i know it's similar to putting a plaster on a broken leg, in terms of protection, but there is a 24 hour hand sanitiser called ZOONO that i will be buying for when schools start back


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 23,315 Mod ✭✭✭✭ robinph


    Having a couple of conditions that increase my chances of coming off badly if I get the virus, but the age and gender are still bigger risk factors, I was mildly concerned before sending the kid back to school in the UK. But the benefits far outweigh the risks for me both for the kid and all of our mental health.

    Have been very happy with the measures that the school was doing on reopening, and their altered plans for September are almost as good, but in dealing with much higher numbers back then things will change slightly. They are still doing everything possible to reduce cross over between different classes and year groups.

    The biggest risk for the adults I think is still from them going into work and commuting rather than from their kid who caught it from another kid who caught it from their parents. The chain required before it reaches me, who works from home, is enough other people with limited contacts and the school where they will be paying close attention to the kids coughs and sneezes such that I feel relatively secure.

    I'm limited in contact with others and that is the main protection for each of us.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,751 ✭✭✭ mirrorwall14


    robinph wrote: »
    Having a couple of conditions that increase my chances of coming off badly if I get the virus, but the age and gender are still bigger risk factors, I was mildly concerned before sending the kid back to school in the UK. But the benefits far outweigh the risks for me both for the kid and all of our mental health.

    Have been very happy with the measures that the school was doing on reopening, and their altered plans for September are almost as good, but in dealing with much higher numbers back then things will change slightly. They are still doing everything possible to reduce cross over between different classes and year groups.

    The biggest risk for the adults I think is still from them going into work and commuting rather than from their kid who caught it from another kid who caught it from their parents. The chain required before it reaches me, who works from home, is enough other people with limited contacts and the school where they will be paying close attention to the kids coughs and sneezes such that I feel relatively secure.

    I'm limited in contact with others and that is the main protection for each of us.

    May I ask what measures and procedures are in place? And what level your child is at?


  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Regional South East Moderators Posts: 12,320 Mod ✭✭✭✭ byhookorbycrook


    Immunosuppressed teacher here . The DES have really dropped the ball here . They had from March to get some kind of plan in place .


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,620 ✭✭✭✭ Wanderer78


    I don't have kids and I'm concerned about them, this is extremely risky, has there been many cases globally of kids picking it up after schools reopened?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,856 ✭✭✭ Ms2011


    I am an immunosuppressed parent with 2 primary aged kids returning to school in just over four weeks. This has been a concern for me from the start and I'm surprised to not have seen it mentioned earlier.
    My children's school is a small rural school with just 2 classes with about 12 kids in both so at least they have a better chance of not contracting the virus than if they were in a bigger school.
    That said that bug that hit before Christmas went through the school like wild fire, at one stage there were only 4 pupils in the whole school :eek:


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 23,315 Mod ✭✭✭✭ robinph


    May I ask what measures and procedures are in place? And what level your child is at?

    The only years that went back were reception, year 1 and year 6. There was about 50% of the reception year back and possibly slightly less of the other years.

    Lots of hand washing, kids all kept separate in each class with no mixing, separate arrival and pick up times for each year group, parents queuing on the footpath outside separated out by 2m, kids stood spaced out when waiting at pick up on the other side of the fence waiting to be called, soft play stuff removed from reception class, as much activity as possible outside, different lunch time for each class, lots of cleaning during the day, closed early on Wednesday for whole school cleaning, more spaced out desks, no bringing in own books or pens, separate area for if anyone gets ill during the day. Lots of other little things as well that I can't quite remember, but felt like they were doing everything possible to ensure that they could open with minimal risks.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,751 ✭✭✭ mirrorwall14


    robinph wrote: »
    The only years that went back were reception, year 1 and year 6. There was about 50% of the reception year back and possibly slightly less of the other years.

    Lots of hand washing, kids all kept separate in each class with no mixing, separate arrival and pick up times for each year group, parents queuing on the footpath outside separated out by 2m, kids stood spaced out when waiting at pick up on the other side of the fence waiting to be called, soft play stuff removed from reception class, as much activity as possible outside, different lunch time for each class, lots of cleaning during the day, closed early on Wednesday for whole school cleaning, more spaced out desks, no bringing in own books or pens, separate area for if anyone gets ill during the day. Lots of other little things as well that I can't quite remember, but felt like they were doing everything possible to ensure that they could open with minimal risks.

    That’s good procedures. I’m so worried the announcement on Monday will be all students back simultaneously


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,400 ✭✭✭✭ thebaz


    Having witnessed packs of teenagers hanging around , not social distancing, looking bored and probably drinking and smoking too much , think school will be good for ther development and mental health, been able to socialise and play sports and learn , this will be good for the majority of students , if a parent is immuno-suppressed and worried, they should be allowed home school if they feal that is best for ther circumstances.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 25,620 ✭✭✭✭ Wanderer78


    thebaz wrote:
    Having witnessed packs of teenagers hanging around , not social distancing, looking bored and probably drinking and smoking too much , think school will be good for ther development and mental health, been able to socialise and play sports and learn , this will be good for the majority of students , if a parent is immuno-suppressed and worried, they should be allowed home school if they feal that is best for ther circumstances.


    How many parents know how to home school?


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,400 ✭✭✭✭ thebaz


    Wanderer78 wrote: »
    How many parents know how to home school?

    I have no idea - just an idea , so the majority of students could return to some form of normality and healty living and development.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,856 ✭✭✭ Ms2011


    thebaz wrote: »
    if a parent is immuno-suppressed and worried, they should be allowed home school if they feal that is best for ther circumstances.

    I'm not a teacher, I haven't the first idea how to teach my kids their school curriculum, tbh I spent from March to June more or less treading water as far as my kids education went. I did school work with them but it was more or less going over what they had been doing up until they left in March, I didn't know the next steps or how to progress in their learning.


  • Registered Users Posts: 12,400 ✭✭✭✭ thebaz


    Ms2011 wrote: »
    I'm not a teacher, I haven't the first idea how to teach my kids their school curriculum, tbh I spent from March to June more or less treading water as far as my kids education went. I did school work with them but it was more or less going over what they had been doing up until they left in March, I didn't know the next steps or how to progress in their learning.

    but if a large majority of parents want to send ther children back to school , should they be denied ??

    as said in my original post , I have witnessed large groups of teenager hanging out together all day , not socially distancing , drinking etc. .... think school might help a majority of these, now and particuly in the future.


  • Registered Users Posts: 649 ✭✭✭ isup


    robinph wrote: »
    The only years that went back were reception, year 1 and year 6. There was about 50% of the reception year back and possibly slightly less of the other years.

    Lots of hand washing, kids all kept separate in each class with no mixing, separate arrival and pick up times for each year group, parents queuing on the footpath outside separated out by 2m, kids stood spaced out when waiting at pick up on the other side of the fence waiting to be called, soft play stuff removed from reception class, as much activity as possible outside, different lunch time for each class, lots of cleaning during the day, closed early on Wednesday for whole school cleaning, more spaced out desks, no bringing in own books or pens, separate area for if anyone gets ill during the day. Lots of other little things as well that I can't quite remember, but felt like they were doing everything possible to ensure that they could open with minimal risks.

    I can't see that being in place here in the primary schools


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,023 ✭✭✭ Gruffalux


    This is an interesting article -
    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/17/nyregion/coronavirus-nyc-schools-reopening-outdoors.html

    During the early 1900's outdoor schooling was used to deal with rampant TB. Loads and loads of moving fresh air.

    http://www.rimed.org/rimedicaljournal/2016/09/2016-09-75-heritage.pdf

    I really think as much as possible children could be taught outdoors.
    Outdoor plastic garden furniture and be outside all the time that the weather is okay.
    The furniture can stay outside so that if it rains they can go inside.
    Use of canopies and open sided marquees.
    Warm weatherproof clothes. Hats. Hot water bottles.
    The article mentions special ''Eskimo'' sleeping bags the kids used.
    Use bigger spaces within walking distance if they need to be inside, like community halls or churches. If indoors open all windows and doors fully. Forget the heating cranked up and teachers wearing unsuitable to outdoors clothes. School is outdoor pursuits environment this year.
    Alternatively teach them at home, especially if you are immuno-compromised, or very worried - It is good craic.

    Look how happy this person is outdoors in their chair. All families could buy one of these for their children and off they go to Forest School...

    210_9.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 403 ✭✭ Icantthinkof1


    I’m so glad you posted this question! I’m in the same boat. I am classed as extremely vulnerable with underlying conditions.
    If schools go back as normal my children will be mixing with up to 90plus children a day.
    No matter I will be allowing my children return to school
    I don’t know what the solution is; perhaps pods of up to 8 children and they attend school every 3days?I would imagine for the teachers who are immunocompromised they will receive sick leave as per their contracts and then will have to claim illness benefit


  • Registered Users Posts: 649 ✭✭✭ isup


    thebaz wrote: »
    but if a large majority of parents want to send ther children back to school , should they be denied ??

    as said in my original post , I have witnessed large groups of teenager hanging out together all day , not socially distancing , drinking etc. .... think school might help a majority of these, now and particuly in the future.

    I don't think they should be denied, just saying that it's worrying and what's more worrying is that they don't distance themselves and follow the guidelines in day to day life. If they did that it'd be alot less of a problem


  • Registered Users Posts: 649 ✭✭✭ isup


    I’m so glad you posted this question! I’m in the same boat. I am classed as extremely vulnerable with underlying conditions.
    If schools go back as normal my children will be mixing with up to 90plus children a day.
    No matter I will be allowing my children return to school
    I don’t know what the solution is; perhaps pods of up to 8 children and they attend school every 3days?
    As another poster mentioned I’ll be lashing on the zoono sanitiser on them before they go to school.
    I would imagine for the teachers who are immunocompromised they will receive sick leave as per their contracts and then will have to claim illness benefit

    I'm the same. I know they need school and to see people. Up to now we still have very limited contact with people and have denied invites of play dates and it is affecting them. I just hoped they would talk about this . I do feel for the teachers too


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,856 ✭✭✭ Ms2011


    thebaz wrote: »
    but if a large majority of parents want to send ther children back to school , should they be denied ??

    as said in my original post , I have witnessed large groups of teenager hanging out together all day , not socially distancing , drinking etc. .... think school might help a majority of these, now and particuly in the future.

    My kids will be going back to school, as I mentioned they go to a small school so will be in contact with a very small amount of other kids, other immunosuppressed parents (and teachers) aren't as fortunate and I definitely think their voices should be heard.


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