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Electric Picnic 2021 - Cancelled :( **No Ticket Sales / Requests **

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  • rubick wrote: »
    Right, here's my Influential Albums list in case yizzer still doing that - bodhrandude I only saw your message the other day! This is mostly cut and pasted from that Facebook challenge that was doing the round in the early days of the plague which is have just done on my phone and emailed to myself so forgive any typos!

    In no particular order:

    Future Sound of London - Accelerator (1991)
    Quite apart from being a defining album of the era, with tracks that demonstrate an experimental range of styles and form the foundations of what FSOL would become; never mind that this LP happens to contain one of the greatest anthems of all time in Papua New Guinea, not to mention a disc of PNG remixes including a cut from Andrew Weatherall - on a personal note this album has become the soundtrack to making our annual trip to Laois for Lyn and I. "Welcome to Central Industrial. We are the future."

    The Prodigy - Experience (1992)
    First concert I went to, early 1994 at the Ulster Hall, Belfast. They had just released 'One Love' at this point. There's some cracking moments on 'Music For The Jilted Generation' but this is their best work in my view. Maybe it's because my introduction to dance music was via largely breakbeat driven hardcore which I will forever associate with that time period and this album. Also I sent off for a cracking white long sleeve t-shirt from the inlay card. Wish I still had it today. Stand out tracks 'Jericho', 'Charly (Trip Into Drum and Bass Version)' and 'Out of Space', the latter still has the capacity to make an entire forest of ravers go Buck She Daft at half-three in the morning. My favourite track from The Prodigy is 'Everybody In The Place' but left it out here as the 12" version (Fairground Remix) is better than the album version.

    Tru Playaz - Real Vibes (1998)
    Cheating a bit with a compilation but this is a collection of wall-to-wall DnB rollers from the late 90s. Essential soundtrack to the post-club nights/mornings of the era. Some of you have never been touched by breakbeats and it shows so frankly some re-evaluation is needed etc. ;)

    New Order - Power, Corruption and Lies (1983)
    Released on 02/05/83, a blueprint for the New Order sound for the coming decades. Famously not on the album but released around the same time, a song called 'Blue Monday' of which some of you may have heard. Standout tracks: all of them. But if I have to pick one, it's 'Ecstacy' or 'Ultraviolence', which sounds like a great night out.

    The Orb - Adventures Beyond the Ultraworld (1991)
    a voyage which starts off with Rickie Lee Jones wistfully describing cloud formations she saw in her youth across the skies of Arizona, takes us rocketing through Earth and Lunar orbits, sending probes into the titular Ultraworld dimension before we gain access and meet Minnie Riperton and Grace Jones or maybe that’s how the ultraterrestrials communicate with us, or at least how we perceive it. Encompassing ambient house, dub reggae, early European electronica, BBC Radio Four announcers, NASA radio broadcasts and field recordings of the audio and bioelectric signals of fishes from Soviet-era Russia, it’s a scene, man. Essential kit.

    Primal Scream - Screamadelica (1991)
    One of the most important albums of the last three decades, everything about this outing from Primal Scream reeks of dry ice and the imprint of a dodgy strobe light burned into your retinas. This album is at once dancing all night with your mates in a dingy club and also watching the sun come up, it's Bobby Gillespie bedecked in full leathers on TOTP not quite believing the welt off those pills, it's acid house and rock music colliding and nothing would ever be the same again. The album's success is in no small part due to the production skills of one Mr. Andrew Weatherall, with no standout tracks because they're all just that good; but in the year where we've lost Andy Weatherall (and doesn't that seem like years ago) and with hope that one day we'll see our family and friends again, let's go with 'Come Together'.

    LCD Soundsystem (2005)
    The eponymous debut from a rake of heads from New York and England has absolutely no right to be this good, the **** did they think they were chatting about tunes, until you listen to it severally and lord, lorda mighty it's spectacular. Blessed to have caught them live three times so far and hopefully given James Murphy's love for Stradbally it's always a possibility in any common or garden non-plague year that they turn up at the Picnic. Essential kit.

    Bjork - Debut (1993)
    Encompassing traditional Icelandic folk balladry, acid house, hip-hop, dub reggae and techno, and an indication of the monumental body of work to come, Björk’s first solo album release spawned five singles, six if you count ‘Play Dead’ which was added in a later version of the album. She actually wrote ‘Human Behaviour’ when she was a teenager but it didn’t really fit the Sugarcubes’ aesthetic. I honestly find it difficult to pick a ‘favourite’ Björk album, ‘Post’, ‘Homogenic’ and ‘Biophilia’ are right up there for this punter as some of her greatest work, but if you’re going to embark on a deep dive into the back catalogue of one the greatest artists of our times you may as well start at the beginning.

    De la Soul – 3 Feet High and Rising (1989)
    For my money one of the greatest hip-hop albums of all time, the debut LP from Long Island’s finest has aged incredibly well. The incorporation of humorous skits, fusion of jazzy samples and clinical wordplay combined with a positive message of peace and love makes ‘3 Feet High and Rising’ an album for the ages. Plus you can dance like **** to it. With 24 tracks on the discs it has a high running time but it’s not noticeable. The album spawned 4 singles including their best known track ‘The Magic Number’; as a long-term fan I didn’t get to see them perform it live until the early 2010s but I’ve seen them a few times since and they always put on a fantastic show, whether in a club or at a festival. Definitely a record I keep coming back to, especially when the sun’s out.

    The Band - Rock of Ages (1972)
    Irish trad and folk songs aside, much of the material on this classic album was pretty much the soundtrack to my youth at family gatherings or wherever a few relatives with guitars were gathered of an evening. My uncle taught himself to play guitar by heading up the Mourne Mountains and yelling into the wind until he got it right, which sounds made up but is 100% true. You can keep your Beatles and Rolling Stones, The Band are the finest act of the 1960s and beyond in my view. See also the recent re-release of the brown album, which features a second disc featuring their set at Woodstock, released for the first time. It's amazing to hear those songs performed not long after they were released.

    TL,DR: Tunes

    :D

    An excellent list I must say, an important fact about the Orb's debut was their love for the group Gong, Steve Hillage was involved with their first few albums and you can hear his guitar playing on Adventures... and in the Blue Room on U.F.Orb you can hear his glissando effect.

    If you want to get into it, you got to get out of it. (Hawkwind 1982)





  • Seathrun66 wrote: »
    May very well see you there.

    A double celebration




  • An excellent list I must say, an important fact about the Orb's debut was their love for the group Gong, Steve Hillage was involved with their first few albums and you can hear his guitar playing on Adventures... and in the Blue Room on U.F.Orb you can hear his glissando effect.

    Hillage is indeed a key player in the colourful history of Orb collaborators, along with Miquette Giraudy! They toured as part of the 30th Anniversary of 'Adventures...' along with Youth and Gaudi - well worth picking up the Further Adventures Live 2016 album! features a gorgeous rendition of 'Star 6, 7, 8, 9'. I don't know much about their work with Gong, will investigate them, cheers! I know them more from System 7.

    The Orb curated The Glade stage at Glastonbury (either 2016 or 2017), featured sets from System 7, Hillage and the mighty Ozric Tentacles, with of course The Orb to finish. A very messy and wonderfully weird Thursday evening!

    Had a gleek at your list too mate - excellent call on 'My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts' - absolutely groundbreaking work. Without Byrne/Eno, there'd be no Negativland, without Negativland there'd be no JAMs/KLF, and without the KLF there'd be no The Orb!




  • I only managed to see Steve Hillage in 2009 when he toured with Daevid Allen and Gong in Edinburgh, it was some gig, the Steve Hillage band done a short opening gig featuring tracks from Fish Rising and Green and the Gong gig was amazing with Miquette handling the electronics usually reserved for the clickswitch doctor Tim Blake, but nice to hear fleshed out versions of the Pot Head Pixie period of Gong. :)

    If you want to get into it, you got to get out of it. (Hawkwind 1982)





  • rubick wrote: »
    Right, here's my Influential Albums list in case yizzer still doing that - bodhrandude I only saw your message the other day! This is mostly cut and pasted from that Facebook challenge that was doing the round in the early days of the plague which is have just done on my phone and emailed to myself so forgive any typos!

    In no particular order:

    Future Sound of London - Accelerator (1991)
    Quite apart from being a defining album of the era, with tracks that demonstrate an experimental range of styles and form the foundations of what FSOL would become; never mind that this LP happens to contain one of the greatest anthems of all time in Papua New Guinea, not to mention a disc of PNG remixes including a cut from Andrew Weatherall - on a personal note this album has become the soundtrack to making our annual trip to Laois for Lyn and I. "Welcome to Central Industrial. We are the future."

    The Prodigy - Experience (1992)
    First concert I went to, early 1994 at the Ulster Hall, Belfast. They had just released 'One Love' at this point. There's some cracking moments on 'Music For The Jilted Generation' but this is their best work in my view. Maybe it's because my introduction to dance music was via largely breakbeat driven hardcore which I will forever associate with that time period and this album. Also I sent off for a cracking white long sleeve t-shirt from the inlay card. Wish I still had it today. Stand out tracks 'Jericho', 'Charly (Trip Into Drum and Bass Version)' and 'Out of Space', the latter still has the capacity to make an entire forest of ravers go Buck She Daft at half-three in the morning. My favourite track from The Prodigy is 'Everybody In The Place' but left it out here as the 12" version (Fairground Remix) is better than the album version.

    Tru Playaz - Real Vibes (1998)
    Cheating a bit with a compilation but this is a collection of wall-to-wall DnB rollers from the late 90s. Essential soundtrack to the post-club nights/mornings of the era. Some of you have never been touched by breakbeats and it shows so frankly some re-evaluation is needed etc. ;)

    New Order - Power, Corruption and Lies (1983)
    Released on 02/05/83, a blueprint for the New Order sound for the coming decades. Famously not on the album but released around the same time, a song called 'Blue Monday' of which some of you may have heard. Standout tracks: all of them. But if I have to pick one, it's 'Ecstacy' or 'Ultraviolence', which sounds like a great night out.

    The Orb - Adventures Beyond the Ultraworld (1991)
    a voyage which starts off with Rickie Lee Jones wistfully describing cloud formations she saw in her youth across the skies of Arizona, takes us rocketing through Earth and Lunar orbits, sending probes into the titular Ultraworld dimension before we gain access and meet Minnie Riperton and Grace Jones or maybe that’s how the ultraterrestrials communicate with us, or at least how we perceive it. Encompassing ambient house, dub reggae, early European electronica, BBC Radio Four announcers, NASA radio broadcasts and field recordings of the audio and bioelectric signals of fishes from Soviet-era Russia, it’s a scene, man. Essential kit.

    Primal Scream - Screamadelica (1991)
    One of the most important albums of the last three decades, everything about this outing from Primal Scream reeks of dry ice and the imprint of a dodgy strobe light burned into your retinas. This album is at once dancing all night with your mates in a dingy club and also watching the sun come up, it's Bobby Gillespie bedecked in full leathers on TOTP not quite believing the welt off those pills, it's acid house and rock music colliding and nothing would ever be the same again. The album's success is in no small part due to the production skills of one Mr. Andrew Weatherall, with no standout tracks because they're all just that good; but in the year where we've lost Andy Weatherall (and doesn't that seem like years ago) and with hope that one day we'll see our family and friends again, let's go with 'Come Together'.

    LCD Soundsystem (2005)
    The eponymous debut from a rake of heads from New York and England has absolutely no right to be this good, the **** did they think they were chatting about tunes, until you listen to it severally and lord, lorda mighty it's spectacular. Blessed to have caught them live three times so far and hopefully given James Murphy's love for Stradbally it's always a possibility in any common or garden non-plague year that they turn up at the Picnic. Essential kit.

    Bjork - Debut (1993)
    Encompassing traditional Icelandic folk balladry, acid house, hip-hop, dub reggae and techno, and an indication of the monumental body of work to come, Björk’s first solo album release spawned five singles, six if you count ‘Play Dead’ which was added in a later version of the album. She actually wrote ‘Human Behaviour’ when she was a teenager but it didn’t really fit the Sugarcubes’ aesthetic. I honestly find it difficult to pick a ‘favourite’ Björk album, ‘Post’, ‘Homogenic’ and ‘Biophilia’ are right up there for this punter as some of her greatest work, but if you’re going to embark on a deep dive into the back catalogue of one the greatest artists of our times you may as well start at the beginning.

    De la Soul – 3 Feet High and Rising (1989)
    For my money one of the greatest hip-hop albums of all time, the debut LP from Long Island’s finest has aged incredibly well. The incorporation of humorous skits, fusion of jazzy samples and clinical wordplay combined with a positive message of peace and love makes ‘3 Feet High and Rising’ an album for the ages. Plus you can dance like **** to it. With 24 tracks on the discs it has a high running time but it’s not noticeable. The album spawned 4 singles including their best known track ‘The Magic Number’; as a long-term fan I didn’t get to see them perform it live until the early 2010s but I’ve seen them a few times since and they always put on a fantastic show, whether in a club or at a festival. Definitely a record I keep coming back to, especially when the sun’s out.

    The Band - Rock of Ages (1972)
    Irish trad and folk songs aside, much of the material on this classic album was pretty much the soundtrack to my youth at family gatherings or wherever a few relatives with guitars were gathered of an evening. My uncle taught himself to play guitar by heading up the Mourne Mountains and yelling into the wind until he got it right, which sounds made up but is 100% true. You can keep your Beatles and Rolling Stones, The Band are the finest act of the 1960s and beyond in my view. See also the recent re-release of the brown album, which features a second disc featuring their set at Woodstock, released for the first time. It's amazing to hear those songs performed not long after they were released.

    TL,DR: Tunes

    :D

    Thank you Rubick for the inspiration!! I've lost touch with most but must say 1-2 really unknown to me!!

    The Orb!! Man my older sis was a real music influencer for me. I remember sneaking in and stealing her albums :) I was so upset when she moved out.


    Edit*** I mean how ****ing future were the FSOL!! Like Accelerator was 1991 waaay ahead of it's time.


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  • 404 sleeps




  • Fatfrog wrote: »
    *** I mean how ****ing future were the FSOL!! Like Accelerator was 1991 waaay ahead of it's time.

    Nice one! The thing I love about FSOL is that after Accelerator they could have went down the commercially lucrative 'Big Tunes' route, but stayed true to what they love, perfectly exemplified in ISDN and Lifeforms. Some of the physical copies are difficult to get these days, but if you can check out their From The Archives series, which is up to Vol. 9 - not many bands have tracks that 'didn't make the cut' but are still works of amazing quality. Most should be available via their own website (they aren't big on the old streaming platforms, only a few items on Spotify). They also have a series called Environments, up to part 6 with part 7 due this year, which are pure cinematic soundscape headphones fodder, just gorgeous work.

    Also check out their work under the alias Amorphous Androgynous - a much anticpated (and delayed) double album We Persuade Ourselves We Are Immortal is scheduled for release late this year. :)




  • Was at the Susan O'Neil (SON) gig on Saturday, it was absolutely amazing. I know there's not a whole pile of competition, but it was the best gig I was at this year! Anyone who hasn't heard of her needs to see her live, you won't regret it.




  • rubick wrote: »
    Hillage is indeed a key player in the colourful history of Orb collaborators, along with Miquette Giraudy! They toured as part of the 30th Anniversary of 'Adventures...' along with Youth and Gaudi - well worth picking up the Further Adventures Live 2016 album! features a gorgeous rendition of 'Star 6, 7, 8, 9'. I don't know much about their work with Gong, will investigate them, cheers! I know them more from System 7.

    The Orb curated The Glade stage at Glastonbury (either 2016 or 2017), featured sets from System 7, Hillage and the mighty Ozric Tentacles, with of course The Orb to finish. A very messy and wonderfully weird Thursday evening!

    Had a gleek at your list too mate - excellent call on 'My Life In The Bush Of Ghosts' - absolutely groundbreaking work. Without Byrne/Eno, there'd be no Negativland, without Negativland there'd be no JAMs/KLF, and without the KLF there'd be no The Orb!

    The end result of the amalgamation was Eat Static - perfect timing being underground and somewhat krusty. Headlined Dance Valley in 1996.

    Still playing festivals



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  • Eat Static followed Squarepusher at The Glade, Glastonbury 2019! I was knackered after The Cure/Squarepusher combo so didn't stay but in fairness it was 2am on the Monday morning by the time he came on.




  • I love the way all they are all intertwined - Steve Hillage, The Orb, System 7, Ozric Tentacles, Eat Static. They were so influential to an almost subculture.

    I only saw the Ozrics once - a much underrated collective.




  • dasdog wrote: »
    I love the way all they are all intertwined - Steve Hillage, The Orb, System 7, Ozric Tentacles, Eat Static. They were so influential to an almost subculture.

    I only saw the Ozrics once - a much underrated collective.

    Add Hawkwind, Gong and Here & Now to the Ozrics stable. :)

    If you want to get into it, you got to get out of it. (Hawkwind 1982)





  • Add Hawkwind, Gong and Here & Now to the Ozrics stable. :)

    For some reason I turned down the opportunity to see Gong and I've never seen Hawkwind - absolutely love the Lemmy years especially. I'll check out Here & Now.




  • Anyone listened to Fontaines new album yet? It's pretty decent but I feel it'll grow on me for sure. It's a little bit more low key when compared to Dogrel for me, but the lead singles are fantastic alright.




  • Musically it's quite good. Lyrically it's poor again, the repetition is even more grating on this album. Surely BIMM is churning out some lyricists too?




  • New music. Nicely done!


    https://youtu.be/4YDXrPhMhSI




  • Musically it's quite good. Lyrically it's poor again, the repetition is even more grating on this album. Surely BIMM is churning out some lyricists too?

    Caught them at Forbidden Fruit last year and tbh they bored me as every song sounded the very same.




  • I’ve learned a lot during this pandemic. A major one is I am absolutely no where near ready to give up on electric picnic. I’m going to be in my 70s and still attending tbh.




  • endainoz wrote: »
    Was at the Susan O'Neil (SON) gig on Saturday, it was absolutely amazing. I know there's not a whole pile of competition, but it was the best gig I was at this year! Anyone who hasn't heard of her needs to see her live, you won't regret it.

    She's great!
    Might spark peoples interest in her when they hear she's the girl from King Kong Company


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  • Musically it's quite good. Lyrically it's poor again, the repetition is even more grating on this album. Surely BIMM is churning out some lyricists too?

    I'd have to strongly disagree with that one, the lyrics they have written are the best I've heard in years, seriously thought provoking stuff. The repetition I may have agreed on with the likes of "is it too real for ya?" But it really grew on me, and so far it's the same for this album. I think it'll probably win every award going too.




  • Does anyone know if you can walk around the grounds of Stradbally Hall or is it closed to the public? I've always thought it would be nice to go down there when the festival isn't on and have a bit of a trip down memory lane, it would be especially nice this year considering it isn't happening, but don't want to get down there and be limited to walking around the roads surrounding it.




  • I have thought about that before.

    I know they do have events there (paintball, fishing, etc.), but I'm not sure about simply wandering about anywhere.

    I actually looked into visiting Curraghmore House last week, but their website says they are closed to the public at the moment. I would imagine this would also be the case with Stradbally Hall, but their website has no mention.

    I imagine they might even have some sort of increased security for the weekend the festival should have happened in case someone decides it might be fun to have a mini Rave In The Woods.




  • I'd say there would be a good few people that would pay a few quid to wander about/picnic.

    It could be a little money earner (insurance permitting).




  • I see Michael Eavis is being quoted as saying Glastonbury 2021 might be wishful thinking. :(

    https://www.mirror.co.uk/3am/celebrity-news/glastonbury-festival-cancelled-founder-shares-22466123

    I would be worried that unless we get some movement here on events with crowds it will be February or March 2021 before we know it and we'll be right back at where we started.




  • Does anyone know if you can walk around the grounds of Stradbally Hall or is it closed to the public? I've always thought it would be nice to go down there when the festival isn't on and have a bit of a trip down memory lane, it would be especially nice this year considering it isn't happening, but don't want to get down there and be limited to walking around the roads surrounding it.

    Did you leave cans buried at the Main Stage?




  • Does anyone know if you can walk around the grounds of Stradbally Hall or is it closed to the public? I've always thought it would be nice to go down there when the festival isn't on and have a bit of a trip down memory lane, it would be especially nice this year considering it isn't happening, but don't want to get down there and be limited to walking around the roads surrounding it.
    I was down there 2 weeks ago. Walked around the area, entered at the trout lake a few people were fishing, and walked up through the woods which would view directly out to the main area, but I didn't walk up there, instead walked around through the woods. I will be back down again in 2 weeks so will have a proper walk around then.




  • nc6000 wrote: »
    I see Michael Eavis is being quoted as saying Glastonbury 2021 might be wishful thinking. :(

    https://www.mirror.co.uk/3am/celebrity-news/glastonbury-festival-cancelled-founder-shares-22466123

    I would be worried that unless we get some movement here on events with crowds it will be February or March 2021 before we know it and we'll be right back at where we started.

    The Eavis family dont own all of the land used for the festival and rent from other land owners who apparently keep increasing their rates, Michael Eavis has said many times in the past they festival may not go ahead, but eventually does. I think hes setting the ground work to drive a hard bargain.

    But this time around theres a legitimate concern, they'd normally have some headline acts booked at this stage, tickets usually go on sale in 2.5 months time. That's not going to happen, I suspect they'll push initial ticket sales into March at a minimum. Coachella also in the same boat.




  • "Just wishful thinking" - Mick E is only stating the obvious here. Its possible that an event like EP could -maybe- adapt and survive to go ahead next year. Would be utterly different to last year and IMO a grim experience. But an event of the scale of Glastonbury is just far too big to take the risk.


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  • Fatfrog wrote: »
    The Eavis family dont own all of the land used for the festival and rent from other land owners who apparently keep increasing their rates, Michael Eavis has said many times in the past they festival may not go ahead, but eventually does. I think hes setting the ground work to drive a hard bargain.

    But this time around theres a legitimate concern, they'd normally have some headline acts booked at this stage, tickets usually go on sale in 2.5 months time. That's not going to happen, I suspect they'll push initial ticket sales into March at a minimum. Coachella also in the same boat.


    All rolled tickets will be rolled again I'd imagine.


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