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The Last Black Man in San Francisco

  • 29-10-2019 3:16pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 10,864 ✭✭✭✭ JupiterKid


    Has anyone else seen this newly released film yet? Went to see it yesterday evening in the Light House with a close mate and his wife.

    It's essentially an art house/indie US film about striving for a sense of home and identity in a city where the 1960s hippie dream has died and inequality and homelessness are rife, and worsening.

    It's the story about two black guys in their 20s who are homeless in San Francisco, a city close to my heart as I did my J1 over there in 1996 and later lived there for a year in 1998/99. I go back to visit friends in SF every few years.

    These guys try to reclaim their old family home, a beautiful wooden 19th century “Victorian” house in the Fillmore district, by squatting there and taking great care of it. Drags on a good bit and not to everyone’s taste, but beautiful cinematography, musical score and good acting. Worth a watch.


Comments

  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Computer Games Moderators, Entertainment Moderators Posts: 27,213 CMod ✭✭✭✭ johnny_ultimate


    A slick and assured debut that’s just a bit rough around the edges. It’s definitely a great city movie, albeit as much a eulogy as it is a symphony. The genuine affection the characters have for the place is matched by them seeing it morph before their eyes. It’s a powerful argument against gentrification, although smart enough to also try to pierce through empty nostalgia.

    It has its own strong, distinctive signature - a lot of that slick approach you see in many indie films, with the very particular angles and symmetry, but also just askew and lively enough to keep you on your toes. Score reminded me a lot of Beasts of the Southern Wild, but I’m not complaining!

    It struggles a bit in the script department, and a few characters feel frustratingly ill-refined. Maybe it was just my mood but it took me a while to settle into its groove as well. But I liked it for the most part, and Talbot’s a director to watch.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,997 ✭✭✭ Ipso


    A slick and assured debut that’s just a bit rough around the edges. It’s definitely a great city movie, albeit as much a eulogy as it is a symphony. The genuine affection the characters have for the place is matched by them seeing it morph before their eyes. It’s a powerful argument against gentrification, although smart enough to also try to pierce through empty nostalgia.

    It has its own strong, distinctive signature - a lot of that slick approach you see in many indie films, with the very particular angles and symmetry, but also just askew and lively enough to keep you on your toes. Score reminded me a lot of Beasts of the Southern Wild, but I’m not complaining!

    It struggles a bit in the script department, and a few characters feel frustratingly ill-refined. Maybe it was just my mood but it took me a while to settle into its groove as well. But I liked it for the most part, and Talbot’s a director to watch.

    On the other hand, a walk through the tenderloin district of the city is a powerful argument for gentrification.


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