Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on hello@boards.ie for help. Thanks :)
Hello all! Please ensure that you are posting a new thread or question in the appropriate forum. The Feedback forum is overwhelmed with questions that are having to be moved elsewhere. If you need help to verify your account contact hello@boards.ie
Hi all,
Vanilla are planning an update to the site on April 24th (next Wednesday). It is a major PHP8 update which is expected to boost performance across the site. The site will be down from 7pm and it is expected to take about an hour to complete. We appreciate your patience during the update.
Thanks all.

Redesigning a kitchen- any tips?

  • 12-07-2019 5:23pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 19,609 ✭✭✭✭


    Currently trying to redesign a kitchen and wondering if posters who have done likewise and have any tips or advice. Especially about modern kitchens and their features- are there features that really appeal and others that annoy you? Storage space that is difficult or easy to access ingredients? Sister of mine hates having her bins inside a drawer whereas other people I know much prefer it to a free standing bin.

    Also any tips/advice on new technologies welcome, especially pyrolytic (self cleaning) ovens- do they work well? Island extraction via down draft extractors that rise up out of the counter top- do they get rid of smoke efficiently enough?


«13

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,227 ✭✭✭MightyMunster


    Muahahaha wrote: »
    Currently trying to redesign a kitchen and wondering if posters who have done likewise and have any tips or advice. Especially about modern kitchens and their features- are there features that really appeal and others that annoy you? Storage space that is difficult or easy to access ingredients? Sister of mine hates having her bins inside a drawer whereas other people I know much prefer it to a free standing bin.

    Also any tips/advice on new technologies welcome, especially pyrolytic (self cleaning) ovens- do they work well? Island extraction via down draft extractors that rise up out of the counter top- do they get rid of smoke efficiently enough?

    Bins in drawer are great, self cleaning ovens are fantastic. There weren't fully pyrolytic double ovens a few years ago so got 2 single ovens.
    all drawers below counter level, wider units are cheaper as less hinges, drawer runners etc.
    Draw out what's going in each unit before finalizing the plan
    A downdraft will take up cupboard space, you can get ceiling island extractors, cost was around 1200 I think but happy with it


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,609 ✭✭✭✭Muahahaha


    Thanks for the tips MightyMunster. I had looked at island cooker hoods but as its a small kitchen it would dominate the space. Hopefully going with a downdraft as I like that they are hidden away when not in use, I know they take up a bit of cupboard space but the carpenter says he can work around it. They've also come down in price a lot, last year most were €1000+ but now there is one on the market for c€400. But I'd love to hear feedback from someone who has one, my main worry would be they struggle to clear a smokey kitchen after using something like a wok.

    Regarding your self cleaning oven- how exactly do they work, I think they heat up to really high temps like 450c+ and burn any food gunk to ash? Wondering can you use it to cook up to 450c+ for stuff like pizzas, that would be a handy side benefit.


  • Registered Users Posts: 472 ✭✭Staph


    1. Regarding appliances, go for standard sizes -especially if having built in. You don't want to have to replace the fridge in a few years and have limited options for a replacement as only a few fit.
    2. Think of where you will place your kettle, toaster, slow cooker, food processor, etc. now. This will aid in planning where you need sockets and suitable counter space for use.
    3. Try have storage near where you will use your bulkier items. If you are not keeping your food processor on the counter, store it near where it will be used.
    4. Same goes for dishes, store near dishwasher/sink so you won't be walking all over the kitchen to put everything away.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,227 ✭✭✭MightyMunster


    For the self cleaning oven, it only cooks up to 300. You remove all the racks and run the cleaning cycle. Wipe it out afterwards to remove the ash. Wouldn't be without it.

    The island fans are built into the ceiling so don't take up and space in the room , check out Falmec for examples.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,783 ✭✭✭heebusjeebus


    I came to the realisation yesterday that he dishwasher is he most used appliance in our kitchen. If I was designing the kitchen again, I'd have it up a bit higher to save me the back ache.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 16,737 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    Built in, eye level oven/s.
    While stoves look lovely, you don't want to be bending down every time to the oven.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,157 ✭✭✭TheShow


    definitely pyrolytic oven. At the press of a button, you'll never have to physically clean an oven again.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,609 ✭✭✭✭Muahahaha


    The island fans are built into the ceiling so don't take up and space in the room , check out Falmec for examples.

    Yeah I had looked into getting it placed in the ceiling but as its a retrofit the direction joists wont allow for this. How do you find the fan you have anyway? From years of rentals with under powered fans I always ended up with smokey kitchens, especially when cooking steaks or on the wok. So dont want to repeat that problem here
    TheShow wrote: »
    definitely pyrolytic oven. At the press of a button, you'll never have to physically clean an oven again.

    I think Im sold on these pyrolytic ovens. Even though I dont use my oven that much (around once a week, Airfryer does everything else) the idea of not having to scrub them out definitely appeals. Oven cleaning is such a pain so something that solves the problem sounds great.

    Has anyone installed a hot water tap like Quooker or similar and how do they find them


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,227 ✭✭✭MightyMunster


    Muahahaha wrote: »
    Yeah I had looked into getting it placed in the ceiling but as its a retrofit the direction joists wont allow for this. How do you find the fan you have anyway? From years of rentals with under powered fans I always ended up with smokey kitchens, especially when cooking steaks or on the wok. So dont want to repeat that problem here



    I think Im sold on these pyrolytic ovens. Even though I dont use my oven that much (around once a week, Airfryer does everything else) the idea of not having to scrub them out definitely appeals. Oven cleaning is such a pain so something that solves the problem sounds great.

    Has anyone installed a hot water tap like Quooker or similar and how do they find them

    Depending on where the hob is you could have a false ceiling with the extractor pipe in it. Plenty of examples on Houzz etc.. works well, It has a serious motor in it and a 6inch pipe!

    Eye level ovens are also great.

    Tall larder units with drawers hold a huge amount and are very user friendly.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,609 ✭✭✭✭Muahahaha


    Actually hadnt thought of a false ceiling, will look into that. How do you find your fan working if the kitchen is very smokey from wok or high temperature cooking- does it clear smoke and odours pretty quick or take a bit of time? Ive never used any of the more modern units and have always had problems before with extractors just not being up to the job. Im also knocking a wall to create an open plan layout so its important that the fan is good enough to prevent kitchen smells and smoke infesting the living area


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 87 ✭✭unhappyBB


    Something I thought about but don't know if they even exist. An extractor where the fan/motor is mounted outside the house to make the kitchen quieter. I know the reason I never use mine is the insane amount of noise they create.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,175 ✭✭✭✭Marcusm


    Hate the idea of bins in a drawer. I prefer free standing bins of the old garbage can style where you have to lift the lid. This leaves a nice open gap to put things through. The number of Brabantia style pop up bins I see with stains etc irks me. I use an open plastic laundry basket for recyclables as it can easily be moved.

    I have pyrolytic cleaning ovens and they are fantastic (although there is an understandable smell when they are cleaning). I am an advocate of buying two single ovens with internal grills. Much better than double ovens. Mine were low end Bosch ones which were about 450 3 years ago.

    I have a wide induction job. Have had induction since 2005 with a 2 year break in a rental with a ceramic and gas job. So glad I am back to induction.

    I’m tall (6’5”) so I had kitchen cabinets made approx 6 inches taller than normal ones. The countertops are higher which make food prep much easier for me. Other family members of as little as 5’5” have no problem using the same counter height. The extra space allowed for extra drawers/storage space. I only have drawers under the countertops, no shelves or cupboards. What you lose in total storage space you more than make up in usable storage space. No crawling on the floor to get into the back of cupboards.

    Finally, and most importantly, a pantry press, full height in a corner (lots of deep storage) with simple shelves. I would say it provides the storage of 10 or more standard cabinets. Plus it looks good.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,788 ✭✭✭Rows Grower


    I don't know what type of worktop you have in mind but if you are using a laminate one then I would recommend that you have the fitter mitre where the two lengths of top meet in the corner instead of using one of those trims that are both a germ trap and an eyesore.

    "Very soon we are going to Mars. You wouldn't have been going to Mars if my opponent won, that I can tell you. You wouldn't even be thinking about it."

    Donald Trump, March 13th 2018.



  • Registered Users Posts: 1,227 ✭✭✭MightyMunster


    unhappyBB wrote: »
    Something I thought about but don't know if they even exist. An extractor where the fan/motor is mounted outside the house to make the kitchen quieter. I know the reason I never use mine is the insane amount of noise they create.

    Yes these are available for ceiling fand


  • Registered Users Posts: 28,772 ✭✭✭✭HeidiHeidi


    Drawers below counter top all the way.


    Think of the number of sockets you might need, then double it.



    If you have a corner cupboard(s), look for carousel interiors or some other design that means you won't lose stuff to the back of that corner until the house is being cleared after your death.


    There are dishwashers with drawers, and ones with lifting trays, so your back isn't broken emptying the thing. I really wish I had one.


    Small bins in drawers x 3, each of which get regularly decanted out into the big bins outside, saves on stinky smells.


  • Registered Users Posts: 59,544 ✭✭✭✭namenotavailablE


    Carousel storage units in corners-great for ensuring access to EVERYTHING in the unit.

    Somewhat gimmicky but we also had 'pop up sockets' installed in our worktops- keeps a wall socket-free if you want to have a minimalist look. They typically have 2-3 sockets per unit.

    Pull out larder drawer units- huge storage capacity.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,609 ✭✭✭✭Muahahaha


    Marcusm wrote: »
    Hate the idea of bins in a drawer. I prefer free standing bins of the old garbage can style where you have to lift the lid. This leaves a nice open gap to put things through. The number of Brabantia style pop up bins I see with stains etc irks me. I use an open plastic laundry basket for recyclables as it can easily be moved.

    I have pyrolytic cleaning ovens and they are fantastic (although there is an understandable smell when they are cleaning). I am an advocate of buying two single ovens with internal grills. Much better than double ovens. Mine were low end Bosch ones which were about 450 3 years ago.

    I have a wide induction job. Have had induction since 2005 with a 2 year break in a rental with a ceramic and gas job. So glad I am back to induction.

    I’m tall (6’5”) so I had kitchen cabinets made approx 6 inches taller than normal ones. The countertops are higher which make food prep much easier for me. Other family members of as little as 5’5” have no problem using the same counter height. The extra space allowed for extra drawers/storage space. I only have drawers under the countertops, no shelves or cupboards. What you lose in total storage space you more than make up in usable storage space. No crawling on the floor to get into the back of cupboards.

    Finally, and most importantly, a pantry press, full height in a corner (lots of deep storage) with simple shelves. I would say it provides the storage of 10 or more standard cabinets. Plus it looks good.

    You've almost read my mind with this post. Have been skeptical with bins in a drawer as I just think a free standing bin is more convenient. Also with the benches, Im tall myself and find the standard 80cm benches give me a pain in the back from leaning over when prepping. So will definitely get higher cabinets than the norm. And the pantry press is essential, Im limited in space but hoping to have a narrow tall one with about 6 or 8 shelves that slides outwards for easy access to ingredients.

    Can I ask why you prefer induction over gas? Thinking of going induction myself but do like how gas is easily controllable.


  • Registered Users Posts: 32,373 ✭✭✭✭rubadub


    I came to the realisation yesterday that he dishwasher is he most used appliance in our kitchen. If I was designing the kitchen again, I'd have it up a bit higher to save me the back ache.
    I heard the idea of 2 dishwashers, marked clean & dirty with removable signs. So they are never emptied in 1 go, you take from the clean one as though its a cupboard, and then put the used stuff in the dirty one. Then wash the dirty one when full and switch signs.

    Your "clean" one might not have been emptied out fully when you start loading it with dirty stuff.


  • Registered Users Posts: 33,519 ✭✭✭✭dudara


    Keep gadgets/gimmicks such as carousels, lifting hinges, pop-up sockets etc to a minimum. They can look great, but in my experience are breakages waiting to happen. And then you’re left with a space designed for something that’s broken. Don’t use drawers for storage of heavy items. I don’t like bins inside of cupboards. It’s the old adage of KISS for me.

    Think about how you use the kitchen, then design storage around that flow of movement. A big pantry clipboard is something that I’ve wanted for a while and the more I’ve thought about it, the more I’m convinced it’ll be one of my next investments.

    Oh, and you’ll never had enough power outlets. Think about where you want lighting when you’re prepping and cooking food.

    I’m also short, only clearing 5 foot, so I actually like low down storage, I can’t reach high shelves or to the back of shelves. For me, when we redo our kitchen, everything will have to be easily viewable from eye level.


  • Registered Users Posts: 25,005 ✭✭✭✭Toto Wolfcastle


    Muahahaha wrote: »
    Can I ask why you prefer induction over gas? Thinking of going induction myself but do like how gas is easily controllable.

    We changed from gas to induction recently and one of the things I love about it is the precise control when compared to gas. It was one of the benefits that people mentioned to us when we were making the decision and it's actually even better than I expected.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 21,418 ✭✭✭✭Alun


    We changed from gas to induction recently and one of the things I love about it is the precise control when compared to gas. It was one of the benefits that people mentioned to us when we were making the decision and it's actually even better than I expected.
    I agree, all the controllability of gas but much easier to clean plus other advantages like timers and flexible cooking zones. Even some professional chefs are now using induction hobs in their kitchens.


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 67,523 Mod ✭✭✭✭L1011


    If you cook using a wok frequently, or don't want to have to potentially replace some other cookware; avoid induction.

    A wok is in the air a lot of the time not in contact, it won't (can't) be getting any heat at all from induction during that time.

    Suspect there'll be a push to get people off using gas for emissions reasons soon enough so if that's your concern, induction all the way

    There are Michelin starred chefs working entirely off induction now, and I suspect it makes the kitchen a slightly less hot working environment


  • Registered Users Posts: 121 ✭✭newbie85


    A big sink, large enough to fit your biggest roasting pan fully under the water. Larder presses too.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,968 ✭✭✭blindside88


    We’ve just had a new kitchen fitted last week. I’ll echo what has been said a couple of times.

    1. Deep pot drawers under counter level. We have one beside the dishwasher and it’s a peg drawer for taking crockery. Best decision we made, dishwasher unloaded in seconds into it.
    2. Large larder press with pull out drawers takes a massive amount of usable storage
    3. Ovens at eye level save all the bending down when cooking
    4. Carousel or similar unit in corner press to avoid items being pushed to the back and never seen again

    Best of luck with your new kitchen


  • Registered Users Posts: 28,013 ✭✭✭✭looksee


    Deep drawers + a shallow one on top for cutlery etc instead of presses. Throw out the space-wasting moulded liner that comes in cutlery drawers and buy a couple of the big useful ones from Tesco for 2 or 3 euro.

    A large, 30cm deep press, about 120cm wide with two doors and as tall as practical - 6 - 7 ft. Bottom shelf high enough to take cereal boxes and tall bottles. Brilliant as a larder press, you will never lose anything at the back out of reach again, and can be placed in a shallow corner, say beside a doorway.

    I had a pull out larder press beside the corner where the electric kettle stood, everyday mugs, tea, coffee, etc all to hand when the larder was pulled out, and pushed away out of sight between-whiles.

    If the kitchen is narrowish have facing rows of presses but don't fill in the bottom of the U. It makes two corners inaccessible - if you have a mobile chopping block or press just standing between them it is easy to move it out of the way to access the presses/drawers on the side walls.

    Integrated equipment is mostly not worth it. Not too long before free-standing equipment comes back into sleek modern kitchens, it makes so much more sense. Integrated stuff wastes so much space - dishwashers and fridges are much smaller than freestanding.

    Consider vinyl flooring, dropped things have a passing chance of bouncing that they don't have on a tiled floor, its warmer and easier on the feet.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16,737 ✭✭✭✭the beer revolu


    Disguise your appliances as cupboards and disguise your cupboards as appliances.
    Oh the laughs you'll have with visitors!


  • Registered Users Posts: 927 ✭✭✭greenttc


    i would have said everything that blindside said. I love my drawers with pegs for crockery and couldnt live without my eye level double oven. love my whirly corner cupboard thingy (to use a technical term)

    maybe I am behind the times etc but when I was getting our kitchen redone I looked at my old kitchen and wondered what the story was with all that space in between the top of the cupboards and the ceiling, such a waste. so, I asked for my cupboards to be full height, right up to the ceiling. great for storing stuff that you never really use but want to keep. (i have my grandmothers old crockery and glassware like champagne flutes and my special mulled wine glasses that get used once a year up there). maybe this cupboard height is standard now but I can get my head around why all cupboards dont do this.

    really wish i got a self cleaning oven now. just thought to myself that I was paying extra for something that the guy in the shop told me tended to break alot. next time...


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,300 ✭✭✭Gloomtastic!


    greenttc wrote: »
    i would have said everything that blindside said. I love my drawers with pegs for crockery and couldnt live without my eye level double oven. love my whirly corner cupboard thingy (to use a technical term)

    maybe I am behind the times etc but when I was getting our kitchen redone I looked at my old kitchen and wondered what the story was with all that space in between the top of the cupboards and the ceiling, such a waste. so, I asked for my cupboards to be full height, right up to the ceiling. great for storing stuff that you never really use but want to keep. (i have my grandmothers old crockery and glassware like champagne flutes and my special mulled wine glasses that get used once a year up there). maybe this cupboard height is standard now but I can get my head around why all cupboards dont do this.

    really wish i got a self cleaning oven now. just thought to myself that I was paying extra for something that the guy in the shop told me tended to break alot. next time...

    Anything we store on top of our cupboards gets covered in a dusty/greasy residue so needs to be cleaned before it’s used. Good idea!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 568 ✭✭✭mikeymouse


    Two dishwashers, if you have the space!


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 4,468 ✭✭✭Ectoplasm


    Muahahaha wrote: »
    Currently trying to redesign a kitchen and wondering if posters who have done likewise and have any tips or advice. Especially about modern kitchens and their features- are there features that really appeal and others that annoy you? Storage space that is difficult or easy to access ingredients? Sister of mine hates having her bins inside a drawer whereas other people I know much prefer it to a free standing bin.

    Also any tips/advice on new technologies welcome, especially pyrolytic (self cleaning) ovens- do they work well? Island extraction via down draft extractors that rise up out of the counter top- do they get rid of smoke efficiently enough?

    I've had a pyro oven for years and don't know how people cope without them. Turn it on, leave it, come back, give it a wipe and it's done.

    If you want to make sure your extractor fan works, you need to measure the volume in your kitchen. All hoods should come with information about their extraction rates. For example this:

    Speed 1 2 3 INT
    Air m3/h 415 480 540 600
    Noise dB(A) 62 64 68 70

    If you measure your kitchen volume [Length (m) x Width (m) x Height (m) = Volume (m3)] and then multiply that answer by 10, that will give you the required capacity for your kitchen.

    So if your kitchen was 4m long by 3m wide by 3m high, the capacity of your kitchen would be 360 which means that, based on the numbers in the table, that cooker hood would be effective at every speed for your size kitchen. HTH


Advertisement