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Two talking points from the weekend's hurling

  • 17-06-2019 1:37pm
    #1
    Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 547 Duffryman


    Hi folks,

    For anyone who likes thinking about the finer points of the rules of hurling and how they could/should be applied, two things arising from the games over the weekend….

    1 – Seamus Callanan’s goal v Limerick.

    As he rounded the last defender, he threw the ball ahead of himself as he prepared to strike. Ball bounced off the ground, and he hit it on the half-volley into the net. Strictly speaking, should the score have been allowed?

    Consider…if the ball had gone a little further from him, and the other Tipp player nearby (think it was Noel McGrath?) struck to the net instead, it would have been ruled out as a thrown pass rather than a proper handpass. Also, if you’re out the field and there’s a man coming to meet you, you’re not allowed to just throw the ball past him and then take it up on the hurl again after it’s gone past that man. So strictly speaking, by the letter of the law, and all that jazz, should the goal have stood? And if so, how is it different (as provided for in the rulebook) from either of those other two situations?

    2 – Eoin Murphy’s save v Rory O’Connor
    Widely praised by pundits on both Sky Sports and Sunday Game for ‘bravery’. But basically what he did was rush straight at an incoming player, then launch himself feet-first at that player, with studs showing. Try that out the field, and you’d be straight into the book if not straight to the sideline. So what in the rulebook makes it legal for the goalkeeper to do that….or should it have been a penalty?

    Discuss!


Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,724 ✭✭✭ nice_guy80


    Duffryman wrote: »
    Hi folks,

    For anyone who likes thinking about the finer points of the rules of hurling and how they could/should be applied, two things arising from the games over the weekend….

    1 – Seamus Callanan’s goal v Limerick.

    As he rounded the last defender, he threw the ball ahead of himself as he prepared to strike. Ball bounced off the ground, and he hit it on the half-volley into the net. Strictly speaking, should the score have been allowed?

    Consider…if the ball had gone a little further from him, and the other Tipp player nearby (think it was Noel McGrath?) struck to the net instead, it would have been ruled out as a thrown pass rather than a proper handpass. Also, if you’re out the field and there’s a man coming to meet you, you’re not allowed to just throw the ball past him and then take it up on the hurl again after it’s gone past that man. So strictly speaking, by the letter of the law, and all that jazz, should the goal have stood? And if so, how is it different (as provided for in the rulebook) from either of those other two situations?

    2 – Eoin Murphy’s save v Rory O’Connor
    Widely praised by pundits on both Sky Sports and Sunday Game for ‘bravery’. But basically what he did was rush straight at an incoming player, then launch himself feet-first at that player, with studs showing. Try that out the field, and you’d be straight into the book if not straight to the sideline. So what in the rulebook makes it legal for the goalkeeper to do that….or should it have been a penalty?

    Discuss!

    didn't Limerick score a goal like Callinans last year?
    Henry Shefflin was the master at throwing the ball out and missing the hurley only to regain possession


  • Registered Users Posts: 222 ✭✭ One_More_Mile


    While technically a free out , no ref is gonna give it .


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,665 ✭✭✭ Bonniedog


    It's in the eye of the beholder.

    Galway people near us on Saturday were incensed by Nolan's first minute taking out of whoever, can't recall. Was laying down a marker time. You either get away with or not. Likewise Keaney on Burke was it? Other days it would be a free and a card.

    We've been on the other side of this - Waterford and Shanahan minor, and Cork 4/5 years ago - so you take them. Some players are good are measuring what the ref is likely to let go or not.

    don't think there were any outrageous calls on field in any game this weekend.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,224 ✭✭✭ tanko


    As far as i can see anything is allowed when a player is scoring a goal in hurling.
    How often does a player take 10 or 12 steps before scoring a goal and a free is never given against them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,961 ✭✭✭✭ cson


    Bonniedog wrote: »
    It's in the eye of the beholder.

    Galway people near us on Saturday were incensed by Nolan's first minute taking out of whoever, can't recall. Was laying down a marker time. You either get away with or not. Likewise Keaney on Burke was it? Other days it would be a free and a card.

    Adrian Tuohey.

    It's one of those you may get away with (especially at home) that early in the game if the ref doesn't have big enough stones to make the right call.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,004 ✭✭✭ C__MC


    Can anyone elaborate on why kk players hurls continuously were on the ground


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,665 ✭✭✭ Bonniedog


    cson wrote: »
    Adrian Tuohey.

    It's one of those you may get away with (especially at home) that early in the game if the ref doesn't have big enough stones to make the right call.


    True.

    Boot was often on the other foot.

    It's a ruthless game. Not an excuse for badness, but every team either has that streak or they die.


  • Registered Users Posts: 171 ✭✭ gmurphy70


    C__MC wrote: »
    Can anyone elaborate on why kk players hurls continuously were on the ground

    Tell them not to be dropping them! Tough game,all sorts of talking points,would love the same again please


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,875 ✭✭✭ Edgware


    tanko wrote: »
    As far as i can see anything is allowed when a player is scoring a goal in hurling.
    How often does a player take 10 or 12 steps before scoring a goal and a free is never given against them.
    True. Christy Ring said it in the dressingroom in 1976 when Cork beat Wexford.
    "Keep going that ref wont blow for steps"


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 499 ✭✭ Joe Daly


    gmurphy70 wrote: »
    Tell them not to be dropping them! Tough game,all sorts of talking points,would love the same again please


    They were constataly pulled out of there hands .


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 499 ✭✭ Joe Daly


    Duffryman wrote: »
    Hi folks,

    For anyone who likes thinking about the finer points of the rules of hurling and how they could/should be applied, two things arising from the games over the weekend….

    1 – Seamus Callanan’s goal v Limerick.

    As he rounded the last defender, he threw the ball ahead of himself as he prepared to strike. Ball bounced off the ground, and he hit it on the half-volley into the net. Strictly speaking, should the score have been allowed?

    Consider…if the ball had gone a little further from him, and the other Tipp player nearby (think it was Noel McGrath?) struck to the net instead, it would have been ruled out as a thrown pass rather than a proper handpass. Also, if you’re out the field and there’s a man coming to meet you, you’re not allowed to just throw the ball past him and then take it up on the hurl again after it’s gone past that man. So strictly speaking, by the letter of the law, and all that jazz, should the goal have stood? And if so, how is it different (as provided for in the rulebook) from either of those other two situations?

    2 – Eoin Murphy’s save v Rory O’Connor
    Widely praised by pundits on both Sky Sports and Sunday Game for ‘bravery’. But basically what he did was rush straight at an incoming player, then launch himself feet-first at that player, with studs showing. Try that out the field, and you’d be straight into the book if not straight to the sideline. So what in the rulebook makes it legal for the goalkeeper to do that….or should it have been a penalty?

    Discuss!

    The talking point for me was the jab TJ Reid got to the mouth in the first half it looked dangerous he had to eventually go off get it cleaned up, also Rory O Connors pull on paul murphy he was lucky to just get a yellow.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 547 Duffryman


    Joe Daly wrote: »
    The talking point for me was the jab TJ Reid got to the mouth in the first half it looked dangerous he had to eventually go off get it cleaned up, also Rory O Connors pull on paul murphy he was lucky to just get a yellow.

    Yup, they'd be talking points too. I just picked those other two because of how one was directly related to how a goal came about it, and the other directly stopped what would otherwise have likely been a goal.

    Think we all know it's impossible for a referee to catch everything in a fast game of hurling, and probably nor would we want them to, as there has to be some element of letting the game flow. But I do think that overall, it's interesting that some things are let go if they happen close to goal, while the ref would take different action if they happened out the field.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,078 ✭✭✭ Grats


    Joe Daly wrote: »
    The talking point for me was the jab TJ Reid got to the mouth in the first half it looked dangerous he had to eventually go off get it cleaned up, also Rory O Connors pull on paul murphy he was lucky to just get a yellow.

    Two Kilkenny talking points for sure. Former ref Brian Gavin was of the opinion that O'Connor was lucky and also that Kilkenny might feel aggrieved in not getting more frees - another talking point if you wish.


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